Seagate STBD6000100 Deal:

Seagate 6TB Internal Hard Drive (STBD6000100)

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Seagate 6TB Internal Hard Drive (STBD6000100)
$192.99
(Compare at $289.99)
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  • 6TB storage capacity with SATA III, 6Gb/s NCQ Interface
  • Seagate AcuTrac servo technology delivers dependable performance
  • Seagate OptiCache technology boosts overall performance by as much as 45% over the previous generation.
  • Seagate Smart Align technology provides a simple, transparent migration to Advanced Format 4K sectors.
  • Best Fit Applications include: Desktop or all-in-one PCs, Home servers , PC-based game systems, Desktop RAID, Direct attached external storage devices (DAS), Network attached storage devices (NAS)


4.1/5 Stars based on 368 customer reviews on Amazon.

Also available at Best Buy for same price. Otherwise, next lowest price on Google Products is $289.99 shipped from a rated merchant.  

Pricing and availability may have changed since this deal was posted.

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rated:
Best Buy via eBay has the Seagate 6TB Internal Hard Drive on sale for $192.99 with free shipping.

Also available at Best Buy for same price. Otherwise, next lowest price on Google Products is $289.99 shipped from a rated merchant.

  • 6TB storage capacity with SATA III, 6Gb/s NCQ Interface
  • Seagate AcuTrac servo technology delivers dependable performance
  • Seagate OptiCache technology boosts overall performance by as much as 45% over the previous generation.
  • Seagate Smart Align technology provides a simple, transparent migration to Advanced Format 4K sectors.
  • Best Fit Applications include: Desktop or all-in-one PCs, Home servers , PC-based game systems, Desktop RAID, Direct attached external storage devices (DAS), Network attached storage devices (NAS)


4.1/5 Stars based on 368 customer reviews on Amazon

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rated:
Whoa! Didn't even know this size was out. So they went from 4 straight to 6... whatever happened to 5TB?  

Looks like eBay is OOS, but BB still has some... but only for in-store pickup

rated:
Mulox said:   Whoa! Didn't even know this size was out. So they went from 4 straight to 6... whatever happened to 5TB?  

Looks like eBay is OOS, but BB still has some... but only for in-store pickup

  2TB platters means it doesn't make sense to make a 5TB drive.

Consumers got 6TB this week, enterprise got 8TB this week.

rated:
Wow, that was insanely fast! It was showing in stock at several stores, and by the time I checked out, all 21 stores in Atlanta were OOS!

Also, for those that are lucky enough to get through, it's limit 1 per customer.

rated:
asuka said:   
Mulox said:   Whoa! Didn't even know this size was out. So they went from 4 straight to 6... whatever happened to 5TB?  

Looks like eBay is OOS, but BB still has some... but only for in-store pickup

  2TB platters means it doesn't make sense to make a 5TB drive.

Consumers got 6TB this week, enterprise got 8TB this week.

  
They're not 2TB platters. There's 6 platters in these, or at least 5. May use SMR, shingled magnetic recording. Causing it to re-write the entire track, every time you change a sector.

rated:
asuka said:   
Mulox said:   Whoa! Didn't even know this size was out. So they went from 4 straight to 6... whatever happened to 5TB?  

Looks like eBay is OOS, but BB still has some... but only for in-store pickup

  2TB platters means it doesn't make sense to make a 5TB drive.

Consumers got 6TB this week, enterprise got 8TB this week.

  6TB came out almost 2 months ago.

rated:
VirtuaL said:   
asuka said:   
Mulox said:   Whoa! Didn't even know this size was out. So they went from 4 straight to 6... whatever happened to 5TB?  

Looks like eBay is OOS, but BB still has some... but only for in-store pickup

  2TB platters means it doesn't make sense to make a 5TB drive.

Consumers got 6TB this week, enterprise got 8TB this week.

  
They're not 2TB platters. There's 6 platters in these, or at least 5. May use SMR, shingled magnetic recording. Causing it to re-write the entire track, every time you change a sector.

  
6 platters is not likely. I don't think anyone has made a 3.5 inch drive with more than 4 platters, 5 at the most. There's only so much you can fit in a 1" form factor.

I'm guessing this is a 4 platter drive, with 1.5GB/platter.

rated:
peterl1365 said:   
VirtuaL said:   
asuka said:   
Mulox said:   Whoa! Didn't even know this size was out. So they went from 4 straight to 6... whatever happened to 5TB?  

Looks like eBay is OOS, but BB still has some... but only for in-store pickup

  2TB platters means it doesn't make sense to make a 5TB drive.

Consumers got 6TB this week, enterprise got 8TB this week.

  
They're not 2TB platters. There's 6 platters in these, or at least 5. May use SMR, shingled magnetic recording. Causing it to re-write the entire track, every time you change a sector.

  
6 platters is not likely. I don't think anyone has made a 3.5 inch drive with more than 4 platters, 5 at the most. There's only so much you can fit in a 1" form factor.

I'm guessing this is a 4 platter drive, with 1.5GB/platter.

  1.5TB/platter*

rated:
** drool **

rated:
granthell said:     1.5TB/platter*
 

  
Thanks.

rated:
peterl1365 said:   
VirtuaL said:   
asuka said:   
Mulox said:   Whoa! Didn't even know this size was out. So they went from 4 straight to 6... whatever happened to 5TB?  

Looks like eBay is OOS, but BB still has some... but only for in-store pickup

  2TB platters means it doesn't make sense to make a 5TB drive.

Consumers got 6TB this week, enterprise got 8TB this week.

  
They're not 2TB platters. There's 6 platters in these, or at least 5. May use SMR, shingled magnetic recording. Causing it to re-write the entire track, every time you change a sector.

  
6 platters is not likely. I don't think anyone has made a 3.5 inch drive with more than 4 platters, 5 at the most. There's only so much you can fit in a 1" form factor.

I'm guessing this is a 4 platter drive, with 1.5GB/platter.

  WD made 5 platter, 6GB HD. Seagate did 6 platter on the enterprise 6GB HD. So no reason why it would not be 6 platters here.

rated:
There is a 5TB drive, it's ST5000DM000. And STBD6000100 is reported as 1TB platters, "6-platter design, a 7200RPM spinning speed and 128MB cache" Call me cynical, but I think they are rushing these larger drives out to increase profits, I would worry about reliability. More platters always means more heat, and more things to go wrong.

rated:
DoorBuster said:   There is a 5TB drive, it's ST5000DM000. And STBD6000100 is reported as 1TB platters, "6-platter design, a 7200RPM spinning speed and 128MB cache" Call me cynical, but I think they are rushing these larger drives out to increase profits, I would worry about reliability. More platters always means more heat, and more things to go wrong.
 

  I would personally steer clear of high platter counts as well.  It's just an opinion, and to be quite honest, I don't think I'll go larger than 3TB for a while.  I just built myself a ZFS setup with 6x 3TB drives, even though it wouldn't have cost much more with 5 of 4TB or 3-4 of 5TB.  I opted for the 3TB drives so that I could go with Raid-Z2 (Raid6) and if a drive fails, I won't have to rebuild a large capacity drive.  I'm terrified of raid rebuilds when a large drive goes bad.  I would have gone for 2TB drives, but I don't feel like having to power 8 drives 24/7.

Nowadays, I'm hesitant to go with large drives unless it's quality.  To save a few bucks on important data is not worth it.  I'd rather save a few bucks on something I'm willing to lose for a brief period of time, NEVER data.  I learned the hard way about 10 years ago.

rated:
Too big to fail.

rated:
Seagate started shipping 8TB drives to enterprise customers yesterday: link

rated:
g0dMAn said:   
DoorBuster said:   There is a 5TB drive, it's ST5000DM000. And STBD6000100 is reported as 1TB platters, "6-platter design, a 7200RPM spinning speed and 128MB cache" Call me cynical, but I think they are rushing these larger drives out to increase profits, I would worry about reliability. More platters always means more heat, and more things to go wrong.
  I would personally steer clear of high platter counts as well.  It's just an opinion, and to be quite honest, I don't think I'll go larger than 3TB for a while.  I just built myself a ZFS setup with 6x 3TB drives, even though it wouldn't have cost much more with 5 of 4TB or 3-4 of 5TB.  I opted for the 3TB drives so that I could go with Raid-Z2 (Raid6) and if a drive fails, I won't have to rebuild a large capacity drive.  I'm terrified of raid rebuilds when a large drive goes bad.  I would have gone for 2TB drives, but I don't feel like having to power 8 drives 24/7.
 


Give unRaid a try sometime.  Unstriped, so you can have all disks spun down except the one you're reading from (great for saving power), and one disk is dedicated parity instead of striped parity.  Basically unstriped Raid3 but you can use any disks you want (different sizes, speeds, etc).  ZFS file system by default.  Works great!  I'm running 4x3TB (so 9TB available storage) + a 400GB cache drive (allows you to write to cache drive (fast, and only it has to be spinning instead of entire array) and then the cache drive data is integrated into array in the middle of the night, or as frequently as you want.

Only drawback is your parity drive must be as large or larger than your largest data drive.

http://lime-technology.com/unraid-server/
 

rated:
kstraka said:   
g0dMAn said:   
DoorBuster said:   There is a 5TB drive, it's ST5000DM000. And STBD6000100 is reported as 1TB platters, "6-platter design, a 7200RPM spinning speed and 128MB cache" Call me cynical, but I think they are rushing these larger drives out to increase profits, I would worry about reliability. More platters always means more heat, and more things to go wrong.
  I would personally steer clear of high platter counts as well.  It's just an opinion, and to be quite honest, I don't think I'll go larger than 3TB for a while.  I just built myself a ZFS setup with 6x 3TB drives, even though it wouldn't have cost much more with 5 of 4TB or 3-4 of 5TB.  I opted for the 3TB drives so that I could go with Raid-Z2 (Raid6) and if a drive fails, I won't have to rebuild a large capacity drive.  I'm terrified of raid rebuilds when a large drive goes bad.  I would have gone for 2TB drives, but I don't feel like having to power 8 drives 24/7.


Give unRaid a try sometime.  Unstriped, so you can have all disks spun down except the one you're reading from (great for saving power), and one disk is dedicated parity instead of striped parity.  Basically unstriped Raid3 but you can use any disks you want (different sizes, speeds, etc).  ZFS file system by default.  Works great!  I'm running 4x3TB (so 9TB available storage) + a 400GB cache drive (allows you to write to cache drive (fast, and only it has to be spinning instead of entire array) and then the cache drive data is integrated into array in the middle of the night, or as frequently as you want.

Only drawback is your parity drive must be as large or larger than your largest data drive.

http://lime-technology.com/unraid-server/ 

  I'll look into it, but I'm afraid that if a single drive fails, it may cause a second to fail during the rebuild of a huge array like yours.  Thanks for the info!

rated:
g0dMAn said:   
DoorBuster said:   There is a 5TB drive, it's ST5000DM000. And STBD6000100 is reported as 1TB platters, "6-platter design, a 7200RPM spinning speed and 128MB cache" Call me cynical, but I think they are rushing these larger drives out to increase profits, I would worry about reliability. More platters always means more heat, and more things to go wrong.
  I would personally steer clear of high platter counts as well.  It's just an opinion, and to be quite honest, I don't think I'll go larger than 3TB for a while.  I just built myself a ZFS setup with 6x 3TB drives, even though it wouldn't have cost much more with 5 of 4TB or 3-4 of 5TB.  I opted for the 3TB drives so that I could go with Raid-Z2 (Raid6) and if a drive fails, I won't have to rebuild a large capacity drive.  I'm terrified of raid rebuilds when a large drive goes bad.  I would have gone for 2TB drives, but I don't feel like having to power 8 drives 24/7.

Nowadays, I'm hesitant to go with large drives unless it's quality.  To save a few bucks on important data is not worth it.  I'd rather save a few bucks on something I'm willing to lose for a brief period of time, NEVER data.  I learned the hard way about 10 years ago.

I almost bought into ZFS. The high number of drives needed for full coverage was a turnoff.  After doing more research, I found that snapshots are an easier and less expensive option (only need two drives). For home mass storage uses that's perfectly acceptable.  ZFS has its uses, but it's overkill unless you need maximum performance and real-time data protection. This much storage typically sits on a NAS so the network is the bottleneck, not the drive speed.  Snapshotting once a day is usually good enough protection for personal use.  Just my 2c.

rated:
5tb has been available.....

rated:
Two out of 5 of my 5tb had failed in 3 months of light use through my Drobo5N. So 6tb Hell NO!!

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