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Trying to figure out if this compressor http://www.harborfreight.com/3-gallon-100-psi-oilless-pancake-ai... is powerful enough to run air tools.

It will be for sale soon, like $40.

I am looking to spray paint outside of a house and run air tools for auto repair like a wrench and such. This seems like a good size and probably not as noisy as its bigger brothers, have concerns that it might not be powerful enough though. If you add 25' long hose, does it make it even more weak with additional length? Any disadvantage of having of oil-less compressor like life span or noise?

Name: 3 Gallon, 100 PSI Oilless Pancake Air Compressor
Tank Capacity: 3 gallon (US)
Air Output at 40 PSI: 1 CFM
Air Output at 90 PSI: 0.6 CFM

Any advice?

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NB. In my town, air compressor powered automotive tools are not allowed to be used at residential addresses.

that compressor is only good for running nail guns, filling car tires, etc. Anything more and it will run continuously and then burn out.

A good buying guide is found here Northern Tool Look at the tool you want to use and see what the requirements are.

Also, Harbor Freight is great for what I call disposable tools. Something you will only need a few times or for a particular project. But an air compressor is an essential tool you will use for many things. Pay more now to save later.

Well first air spray guns are for limited applications, generally NOT for painting the outside of your house- I've tried to make my compressor do that and it won't- very messy and poor job. For painting your house your want an airless paint gun- which I think essentailly pumps the paint with a pump rather than. I got one refurbished for a few hundred (wagner 1420- cost me $170 refurbished)- the thing is great. I painted my garage in 1 hour flat (total painting+cleanup time).

In terms of power those little pancake compressors aren't good for much- I know they are ok for nail guns, I think some auto tools will require much more power. I know if you look at compressors in homedepot they have some little chart showing you what tools you can run of which compresors.

As far as hose lenght, doesn't impact power like youd think. Actually for mine they recommend using longer hoses rather than electrical extension cords. I've got 2 50 foot hoses and it works great.

JUNK won't work to do anything but run nail guns even then a framing nailer will probably blow it up since it uses much larger nails thus more air. Other then that blowing up balls and tires is about it. This will in no way run a impact gun or any air tools. If you want something to run a impact gun and air tools like air ratchets, sanders, cut off wheel tools etc. You MUST get a larger compressor like 60 gal is perfect. I bought a 25 gallon I believe for my first compressor it worked OK but not perfect. I was able to do a impact but always kicked on and was a pain because you had to wait especially if you got a stubborn bolt etc. Since then I got rid of it and got my 60 gallon one I picked up at Lowes when it was on sale during tool week there. Then used a 10 percent coupon I got online on eBay on top of it. I paid in the 400 range I believe for it and it's freaking amazing. night and day difference between the old one and this one. It had double the CFM and power the little one I used to have has. No bolt and nut is a problem with it now.

In the end I suggest you save up buy a good air compressor something you won't regret wasting your money on you can never buy a big enough one because the possibilities for use are endless and things you wouldn't be able to use with a small one you will with the larger one even if it's something you don't plan on using now in the future you will been there done that already!

Lorenzo

longwood8 said:   that compressor is only good for running nail guns, filling car tires, etc. Anything more and it will run continuously and then burn out.

A good buying guide is found here Northern Tool Look at the tool you want to use and see what the requirements are.

Also, Harbor Freight is great for what I call disposable tools. Something you will only need a few times or for a particular project. But an air compressor is an essential tool you will use for many things. Pay more now to save later.


100% agreed. According to that northen tool chart that thing is only good for small nail guns. Also agree about the Harbor Freight comment- there is a reason they are so inexpensive. You can maybe count on them for a period of time after you buy them, but generally don't buy stuff from there that you expect to use for a long time.

BradMajors said:   NB. In my town, air compressor powered automotive tools are not allowed to be used at residential addresses.Anti-safety, pro-electrocution law pushed by the local funeral industry?

BlueLetterD, the Campbell-Hausfeld catalog can give you an idea of the minimum CFM & PSI needs for various air tools. Their budget tools tend to have some of the lowest CFM requirements, so you definitely don't want a compressor that can't meet them for any tool that needs continuous air flow, like a paint sprayer, grinder, or sander. 1 CFM @ 40 PSI and 0.6 CFM @ 90 PSI are really, really low, and the only paint gun practical to use with that would be an internal mix, pressure feed gun (OK but not great for house painting but fairly lousy for car painting). You need at least 2-4 CFM @ 40 PSI for an external mix, siphon feed gun (good for car paint, worst for house paint).

For what you want to do, dont even bother.

I am eye-balling now http://www.harborfreight.com/2-1-2-half-hp-10-gallon-125-psi-air... with:

# Air delivery: 5.3 SCFM @ 90 PSI
# 6.2 SCFM @ 40 PSI

What do you think?

BlueLetterD said:   I am eye-balling now http://www.harborfreight.com/2-1-2-half-hp-10-gallon-125-psi-air... with:

# Air delivery: 5.3 SCFM @ 90 PSI
# 6.2 SCFM @ 40 PSI

What do you think?
You can run a lot of tools continuously from a compressor with those ratings, but you may want to check reviews at HFreviews.com because different compressors with similar advertised ratings can vary a lot in actual performance. Also compressors that are slightly smaller (8 gal., 4 CFM @90 PSI) are sometimes the same price from Sears (Craftsman = DeVilbiss) or Home Depot (Husky = Campbell Hausfeld).

oiless you can hear 12 houses away.

oiled you can hear 10 houses away.

i have the bostich from Lowes which is close to that one and have built a few 12x24 sheds with framing gun from Harbor Freight. ( the blue one ) yea i had to wait several times for compressor to catch up, but i suck and i am slow so it dont matter.

THese tiny compressors are good for running small nail guns and airing up your bike tires. You really can't run air tools with them...

As for painting a house, you can't paint a house with a compressor driven paint gun. The paint mist is too fine and easilly blows away.

For painting houses you need something like this: Graco Airless Sprayer

For painting your house one time it might be best to just rent a good system. As for the compressor, save your money till you can get a good one. I've had various compressors over the years and the cheap ones always either burn out or leak shortly after the warranty expires...

For what you want to do, dont even bother. 200% agree with you.

If you want to spray pain you need something like this

http://www.amazon.com/HeavyDuty-Electric-Wheeled-Portable-Compre...

I own 4 air compressors.
1. This one. (dewalt) I carry like a back up spray compressor and if sometimes I need to get out and do some varnish spray if it's not possible in the work shop
2. Husky 60 Gallon, It's stationary in the work shop, It can handle well what I do.
3. The one you are originally posted. It's good for 2 nail guns at once.
4. 1 Gal. Senco compressor which is great for light nail gun works.

Do not waste money on the compressors with small tanks and low power motor. This dewalt compressor is as low as you can go.

As a general rule, the bigger the tank, the less the motor has to work to catch up with usage (also less noise). If budget and space allows, get the bigger compressor for options to do other jobs. Nail guns use air in short bursts, so tank size is less critical. If you're blowing out a sprinkler system, you'll need the reserve of a larger tank to flush the line. If space permits, choose vertical tank over horizontal for smaller footprint. I have Craftsman 20gal oil less. Wish I had vertical instead of horizontal tank. HF is good for cheap quick connects to swap tools quickly. HF's Earthquake impact wrench is good. Highly recommend the air powered brake fluid bleeder. The key factor in the decision is a larger tank reserve will hold the psi if the tool runs longer than a few seconds. A smaller tank will see psi drop quickly.

First shop for the impact wrench. Husky seems to be good and powerful (my friend has it). But you need to get one that has about 400 to 500 foot pounds of impact power to remove stuck lug nuts. Then look at the specs for that impact wrench. It will have 2 specs (1) cubic foot per minute (2) PSI needed to drive that wrench.

Most pnuematic tools need 90 psi,but the capacity ,size of tank is key.I have a 32 gal Sears comp been very good,very noisey,the professional ones are much quieter.I am a retired senior master tech and do all my repairs and use mainly Snap on air tools.Got it many years ago don't remember the cost.



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