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My 2001 Toyota Corolla is coming to the end of its life - I may get a few more months out of it, but it's time to start seriously looking for another car. I bought my current car new in 2000, and it replaced a 1991 Corolla, which I aquired from a family member. Which replaced a Tercel I had bought used and also had for years. So I've been a Toyota girl for a long time. However, I've been souring a little on the company lately (mainly due to some recent service department shenanigans). Additionally, the reviews for the 2012 Corolla haven't exactly been overwhelmingly positive. So I'm willing to look at other brands this time around. Specifically, the cars I have my eye on are the Hyundai Elantra and the Mazda 3. For the purpose of discussion, I want to focus on these 2 cars only (no Crown Vics, sorry!)

I keep my cars forever, so I prefer to buy new and outfit them the way I want. I drive about 12,000 miles per year give or take, want something that has low maintenance costs, good mileage, good reliability, and is maybe marginally more fun than a Corolla to drive. I want an automatic transmission. And I would really like a nav system, alarm/immobilizer, and built in bluetooth so yes I will want some options, not just the bare bones model. I'm going to have to finance the car, but my credit union is offering up to 120% financing for 72 months for 2.99%, so I would likely only go with dealer financing if they can beat that (I have good enough credit that I would likely qualify for that rate). I'd like to keep the OTD price as close to $20,000 as possible, but I know that's going to be a challenge with both of these cars, since the options are going to bump the costs up, and I am tending to gravitate towards the higher end models. But if I can negotiate the final price down as close to that $20,000 point as possible, I will be happy.

At this point, with my car running reasonably well, as it is now, I think I can reasonably expect to get a $2,000 dealer trade in for it, and that would be my down payment. This is one reason I don't want to wait until my current car actually dies before purchasing the new one. OTOH, in case it does die, at least my credit union will finance 100%. But I'd rather get some kind of trade in value if I can. I don't have another car to use, so selling it privately before I purchase the new car would be a giant pain, so I'll probably just do the dealer trade in, even though I do realize I could probably get a little more if I did sell it privately.

I know the Elantra's price will not be all that negotiable since they are so popular. Will I have a better chance of negotiating a better price on a Mazda 3? I like Elantra's warranty, and I realize the Mazda 3's won't be as good or as long, but Mazda's 5 years seems reasonable. How does the Mazda 3 compare to the Elantra in terms of reliability and costs to maintain? I'm not finding a lot of comparative information on that on the web. Not for recent models, anyway. How does Mazda compare to Hyundai in terms of reputation generally? I know Hyundai has come a long way in the last few years. How does Mazda compare?

Which of these two cars make the greater amount of sense to buy - both in terms of driving experience, and financially?

My current car was the first one I ever bought new, and I probably did just about everything wrong when I bought it. The purchasing experience was horrible, and the deal took about 8 endlessly long hours. Luckily, I was very happy with the car. This time, however, I want to be a lot better informed beforehand, avoid the pitfalls I fell into last time, and have a good strategy to get a good deal on a car that will make me happy long-term.

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I'm referring to the versions equipped with automatic transmissions, of course, the kind the vast majority of Americans ... (more)

larrymoencurly (Apr. 29, 2012 @ 2:02a) |

How is this a plus ?!

pianomaster (Jun. 18, 2012 @ 10:07a) |

Today I bought my new car.

I ended up going for a Camry SE (4 cyl.) with the convenience, leather, navigation, and moonro... (more)

gooddealie (Jul. 08, 2012 @ 4:06a) |

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I my Mazda 3, but its an older model. I can't speak to the new model's reliability.

Basically I just came on here to say: You're better off selling the corolla on craigslist, youll likely increase value by >50%

ETA: Are you looking at a sedan/hatch... the 2.5 or the skyactiv

Text


Comfort
Due to its greater rear head- and legroom, backseat passengers will be able to stretch out a lot more in the Mazda Mazda3 than the Hyundai Elantra. The Hyundai Elantra will be a favorite with taller drivers due to its greater front head- and legroom than the Mazda Mazda3.

Convenience
You'll be making about the same number of stops at the gas station with the Mazda Mazda3 as you will with the Hyundai Elantra, as they get the same number of miles per tank of gas.

Cost
There are a lot of factors to consider when calculating the overall cost of a vehicle. The main consideration is Manufacturer's Suggested Retail Price (MSRP). The Mazda Mazda3 is somewhat more expensive than the Hyundai Elantra. Another consideration is the Destination Charge, which is a standard charge for transporting the vehicle to the dealer from where it's built. The Mazda Mazda3 and the Hyundai Elantra have similar Destination Charges.

Dimensions
The Mazda Mazda3 is a little narrower than the Hyundai Elantra, so you'll have an easier time getting in and out of the car in a tight parking spot. When looking at overall length, the Mazda Mazda3 takes up about the same amount of space in your garage as the Hyundai Elantra.

Drivetrain
With somewhat higher torque, the engine of the Mazda Mazda3 transmits a bit more power to the wheels than the Hyundai Elantra.

Handling
The Mazda Mazda3 has about the same turning radius as the Hyundai Elantra, allowing equal maneuverability in and out of tight spots.

Performance
When it comes to horsepower, the Mazda Mazda3 is somewhat more powerful than the Hyundai Elantra.

Utility
In terms of seating you'll be able to fit the same number of people in both the Mazda Mazda3 and the Hyundai Elantra. The Mazda Mazda3 has significantly less cargo room than the Hyundai Elantra, which may be a concern if you do a lot of warehouse shopping.

Warranty
The basic warranty of the Mazda Mazda3 is not as nearly as extensive as that of the Hyundai Elantra.

Text

Elantra

Likes:

Stunning design and details
Great gas mileage
Refined, quiet cabin
Rides smoothly
Standard features

Dislikes:

Sluggish throttle response
Rear headroom is tight
Steering's better, not best

Rating:

8.2

Mazda 3

Likes:

Excellent handling and stability
Class-leading steering feel
Nicely configured interior
Disc brakes on all models
Very refined powertrains (SkyActiv)

Dislikes:

Optional moonroof limits headroom
Base and s still have mediocre gas mileage
Road noise
Bluetooth reserved for top trims

Rating:

8.2


Personally, I would go with the Elantra. My parents bought one about 3 months ago and they love it!

I'm looking at the sedan. Cost may rule out the skyactiv.

Do you live in NYC? Why can't you sell the old car after you buy the new one? Dealer trade-in is a pitfall.

Not much of an opinion on any of the three cars (I did rent a Mazda 5 recently and it wasn't a bad ride, small for my tastes, but you seem like you don't mind that).

BUT

I did want to offer a couple thoughts:
1. Forget factory installed nav, GPS are cheap, have more features, can be updated more cheaply than a dealer system, etc. There was even an article about a year ago that tracked used prices with and without nav, and the without nav were actually higher when you compared apples to apples.
2. If you're getting into over 100% retail book LTV in a car loan, stop immediately. You're being upsold things you flatly don't need.
3. +1 to privately selling your car if it's running acceptably now.

Thanks for that comparison.

They look close. The Mazda 3 looks like it's more fun to drive, handles a little better, and has a more powerful engine, while the Elantra has more trunk and interior room, a better warranty, and nicer add-ons (toys).

The Mazda 3 has a higher MSRP, but is that price somewhat negotiable? It seems like the cost of the Elantra doesn't stand much chance of coming down below MSRP.

The elantra hatchback is still the old design, stick with the sedan. For the Mazda3 definitely go with the skyactiv version, better mileage than the base and almost as much power as the top of the line. Edmunds has been doing a long term test with a mazda3 skyactiv hatch, that might give you some info. If you keep them that long I'd test drive both and buy whichever one you like more, they're both good choices. If you load them up it'll probably be closer to 22.5k. Also DCU has 1.99 up to 72 months up to 120% ltv.

mwa423 said:   Not much of an opinion on any of the three cars (I did rent a Mazda 5 recently and it wasn't a bad ride, small for my tastes, but you seem like you don't mind that).

BUT

I did want to offer a couple thoughts:
1. Forget factory installed nav, GPS are cheap, have more features, can be updated more cheaply than a dealer system, etc. There was even an article about a year ago that tracked used prices with and without nav, and the without nav were actually higher when you compared apples to apples.
2. If you're getting into over 100% retail book LTV in a car loan, stop immediately. You're being upsold things you flatly don't need.
3. +1 to privately selling your car if it's running acceptably now.


I have been using a tomtom suction cupped to the windshield when I drive longer distances for about 4 years (2 different models of GPS in that time). It's cheap, it works, but it looks so hokey compared to a built in nav. Not to mention the suction cup doesn't always stay stuck to the windshield, which is a giant pain if I'm in heavy traffic.

No, I'm definitely not wanting to get into >100% LTV. My $20,000 price point will probably prevent that from happening, though.

I realize the wisdom of selling my car privately, but I don't have another vehicle I can borrow until I purchase the new one (I have no alternative for commuting and I sometimes need a car for work). I'm not sure I want to deal with renting, and the cost may eat up a lot of the selling price difference.

gooddealie said:   I realize the wisdom of selling my car privately, but I don't have another vehicle I can borrow until I purchase the new one (I have no alternative for commuting and I sometimes need a car for work). I'm not sure I want to deal with renting, and the cost may eat up a lot of the selling price difference.
You buy the new one first and then sell (privately) the current car.

I have a 2011 Mazda 3 and so far:
The Good:
Sweet steering control - This is the first thing you'll notice
The loaded model is only a couple thousand more expensive than the base
Made in Japan (that still means something to me)

The Bad:
Noise insulation - Or lack of. You can hear every bit of road noise. If I'm driving next to another Mazda 3 on a freeway, I can hear that guy's radio.
Couple of rattly vibrating parts needed fixing within 2000 miles.


Don't get the original Navigation system - its small and sucky. Just use a Garmin or even better, your smartphone.

gooddealie said:   My current car was the first one I ever bought new, and I probably did just about everything wrong when I bought it. The purchasing experience was horrible, and the deal took about 8 endlessly long hours. Luckily, I was very happy with the car. This time, however, I want to be a lot better informed beforehand, avoid the pitfalls I fell into last time, and have a good strategy to get a good deal on a car that will make me happy long-term.

There is costco membership car buying.
You can buy a car at an affiliated dealer through no haggle preset pricing.



There are credit unions that have affiliated dealers that do similar preset pricing too.




http://www.costcoauto.com/enterzipcode.aspx?gotourl=%2fdefault.a...

Low, prearranged pricing for Costco members
BIG savings on many makes and models
More than 2,200 hand-selected dealerships nationwide
Trained Authorized Dealer Contacts to serve you
Smooth, seamless car-buying experience

How do you wear out a 2001 Toyoto in 12 years?
Was it due to lack of maintenance or something?

If you are that hard on vehicles, you may want to see which ones are the most durable and can take your abuse. Also, look into better maintenance to preserve it for longer.

On another note, my brother just bought a new Elantra and loves it. Go new as the cost for a model a few years old and cost to reinstate the warranty will be the same as a new car. Personnally, I buy used and aim for higher end models for comfort. Own a 2005 Avalon and love it. Costs a ton less than my brothers Elantra.

Good luck

id reccomend another toyota at all cost.....Hyundai is fine but they are almost priced even with toyota now,,,stay away from mazda,its a ford in disquise...and thousands are added to the cost of car because they are unionized,,,you know for their big benefits and retirement packages..i will only buy asian cars that are Not unionized

psychoslowmatic said:   The elantra hatchback is still the old design, stick with the sedan.The Elantra "hatchback" is actually the Touring and it's more of a wagon (a la Toyota Matrix) than a true hatchback. Lots of cargo space, however. I really like mine. But it does not have the same gas mileage or styling as the normal Elantra.

Why are you getting rid of cars after 10 years? Unless you're a real estate agent or in some other profession where you need to have an expensive car to show that you're competent at your job, keep your car longer!
My Jeep is a 1995 on the outside but everything on the inside is pretty much brand new including a rebuilt tranny. Find a family mechanic and have him replace a lot of parts in your current car to get it in running shape/ up to your standards!

I would take a Mazda 3 over a Hyundai Elantra any day. My own view is the korean brands still are not up to the quality of the Japanese brands. I've read a couple of reviews and the Mazda 3 is almost always the recommended car in this class. The long warranty of the Hyundai is nice but who cares if the car is always in the shop! Resale value differences are huge between these brands. If you plan on keeping the car forever then that doesn't matter.

For what it is worth, here is a chart from Consumer Reports. Reliability for the Elantra is listed as average probably because it just came out in 2011. Once the Elantra has been out for a few years, that year's rating will probably be listed higher. Some people feel the ride is a bit stiff with that car as well, so make sure you are okay with the ride. I also would not rule out other options such as the Corolla.

uutxs said:   gooddealie said:   I realize the wisdom of selling my car privately, but I don't have another vehicle I can borrow until I purchase the new one (I have no alternative for commuting and I sometimes need a car for work). I'm not sure I want to deal with renting, and the cost may eat up a lot of the selling price difference.
You buy the new one first and then sell (privately) the current car.

+1

Take advantage of the 100% financing you have available to purchase the new car, then sell the old one and use the proceeds to pay down the loan to where it would have been (or use the proceeds to pay off any higher interest rate debt you may have).

And, for what it's worth, I prefer having a car that's fun to drive, so I'd probably go with the Mazda.

gooddealie said:   I keep my cars forever, so I prefer to buy new and outfit them the way I want.

I had to chuckle as my 1995 Mazda Protege is going strong. It has low mileage (under 100k) because I work at home, but it's been a great car to have for 17 years. Not sure how the new Mazda lineup compares but I am happy with mine.

I do know that the Prius c is out and it lists for $19k so that might be an option. I have not read up much on it other than it gets about 50 mpg. We've had 2 regular Prius' (wife's car) and my parents liked our so much they bought one as well.

rshaslam said:   How do you wear out a 2001 Toyoto in 12 years?
Was it due to lack of maintenance or something?

If you are that hard on vehicles, you may want to see which ones are the most durable and can take your abuse. Also, look into better maintenance to preserve it for longer.



No actually I maintained it regularly - until recently I took it to the dealership, even for oil changes. So it wasn't a poor maintenance thing. Typically oil changes were done every 4,000 miles, and I checked and topped up the oil every week.

The 2001 Corollas are 8th generation Corollas, and it is EXTREMELY common for this generation of Corolla to burn oil with no sign of leaks or smoke. The oil consumption problem was only fixed between 2002-2003 (there were several issues). Toyota has known for years and years about this defect in this generation of Corolla, but they never issued a recall.

The most common causes for the oil burning are stuck piston rings, followed by leaky valve stem seals. Both are extremely $$$$$ to fix. In most cases, an engine re-build is required.

I've been told that when Toyota built the engines they put smaller pistons in the engine than what should of been in there and just put in oversized rings to compensate. They did this to make the initial startup and break in easier. Well after a certain number of miles the rings start wearing down and then the oil consumption starts and it only gets worse. I also heard another explanation - that Toyota used a ring provider that gave them less than good piston rings and a lot of them broke quite early. Regardless of which explanation is correct, I strongly suspect the rings in the engine of my car are worn and sticking. My car has about 170,000 miles. It started drinking oil noticeably around 120,000 miles.... slowly, at first. Now it needs about a quart about every 7-800 miles or so.

Once an engine begings to burn oil, residue and excess carbon that is developed as a result of oil in the combustion chamber, begins to build up. The carbon build up causes a lot of other problems, and it accelerates the oil consumption. Without getting too detailed, the carbon is leaving residue and coating other components. I just had to replace the spark plugs and the oxygen sensors - and they were coated in a white ash. Thank goodness the catalytic converter wasn't poisoned - that could have been a pricey possibility. Additionally, the engine has developed a rattle that's beginning to become more noticeable, at least to me. That's probably not good, and whatever is causing it (I've had different mechanics render different opinions), the only real solution is probably going to be an engine re-build, which makes very poor financial sense. So... my that is why my current vehicle is on borrowed time, and it's time to bite the bullet and get a new car.

robstrash said:   gooddealie said:   I keep my cars forever, so I prefer to buy new and outfit them the way I want.

I had to chuckle as my 1995 Mazda Protege is going strong. It has low mileage (under 100k) because I work at home, but it's been a great car to have for 17 years. Not sure how the new Mazda lineup compares but I am happy with mine.

I do know that the Prius c is out and it lists for $19k so that might be an option. I have not read up much on it other than it gets about 50 mpg. We've had 2 regular Prius' (wife's car) and my parents liked our so much they bought one as well.


My parents got a top of the line Prius with every bell and whistle imaginable.... spent a lot on it. I'd end up comparing their car to the Prius C. I'd rather not feel like I got "the stripped version" of a better car, if you know what I mean. Also, I came to the conclusion that it would take to long to make up the difference in operating cost to justify the extra cost required to purchase the hybrid. Mind you, I wasn't using $19,000 as the comparison figure. With comparable options, the hybrid purchase cost would be quite a bit higher than that.

falcontx said:   uutxs said:   gooddealie said:   I realize the wisdom of selling my car privately, but I don't have another vehicle I can borrow until I purchase the new one (I have no alternative for commuting and I sometimes need a car for work). I'm not sure I want to deal with renting, and the cost may eat up a lot of the selling price difference.
You buy the new one first and then sell (privately) the current car.

+1

Take advantage of the 100% financing you have available to purchase the new car, then sell the old one and use the proceeds to pay down the loan to where it would have been (or use the proceeds to pay off any higher interest rate debt you may have).

And, for what it's worth, I prefer having a car that's fun to drive, so I'd probably go with the Mazda.


OK... but if I do it that way, won't I end up with substantially higher car payments each month (due to the extra $2 to 3,000 worth of loan I'd need), even if I do use the proceeds of the private sale towards the loan payment? Aren't the payment amounts equal amounts determined at the beginning of the loan? An additional loan payment after the loan is made would reduce the number of payments required to pay the loan off, but I would still be stuck with the higher car payment amount each month throughout the life of the loan, wouldn't I?

Pics ??

Dont overlook carmax if nearby. How many miles on your current car? If 12k annaul, the assume over 100k, but carmax is trying to sell a 2002 corolla with low miles for $12,000. Link

Saw your 170k answer later, makes it unsellable at carmax, but they will still give you a week to shop your car around or have dealer beat the number.

Also, with all the driving, especially lots of city miles, the extra cost of a Prius is offset by the gas savings. Higher gas prices make it even more so.

Anyway, Mazda is the more fun to drive and Hyundai the value choice. Forget the navigation and just use your smartphone.

Here's another vote for the Mazda. My ex-wife was on her second Miata when we split. I had a 2002 Protege5 that was totaled a few years ago and just replaced it with a new 2011 Mazda3 5-door (I'm a fan of the body style). I really, really wanted the MazdaSpeed3, but just couldn't justify the price difference. I absolutely LOVE my car. I used to travel a lot for work and have had just about every car on the market as a rental at one point or another and this one is still my favorite.

All that being said, a week after I got my new car I stumbled onto a new Fiat dealer in a nearby town. I'd seen them but hadn't driven one. I hate to say it, but I really enjoyed driving the new 500. It's a bit on the small side, but it's super fun to drive. If you're looking at just the Hyundai and the Mazda, I'd suggest the Mazda without hesitation. If you're open to another option, see if you can find a Fiat dealer. What's the worst that can happen??

Another option you'd probably reject quickly, but Honda accord lx se ex are in your price range. It's getting a new model next year, so you're buying a very tried and true car, doubly so. The deals on them are incredible recently, probably from a $1,000 or $2,000 dealer rebate.

Chevy cruze is one to consider right now and I would 2nd the accord lx,se

crown vic

I bought an Elantra via Truecar.com. Great, easy, painless way to buy a car imo. I think the Mazda is so close that it boils down to personal taste and the deal. The Hyundai warranty is reassuring.

I'd go for the Elantra. The interior of the Mazda 3 gives a really cheap feeling when you sit inside. Louder than it should be. Yes, it's more powerful but the trade off is quite a bit difference in fuel efficiency. The Mazda 3 is just not a fuel efficient vehicle and while more powerful than the Elantra, it's not that impressive unless you get the Speed3.

cv

I prefer Mazda as well. Maybe check into Camry or Accord. I bought my new Honda Accord 4 cy LX with some upgrade for under 24K out of the door. 100% finance at 0.9% for 5 yrs. The insurance on Camry or Accord sometimes is cheaper than the smaller car.

One word: Warranty. Do your own research as to what is and IS NOT covered. Go with the better warranty. Figure out the cost of all the options before you go to the dealer. At that point, convince you're not buying that day and go to the dealer to take a look. If you find a car that fits your options, tell the sales person you'll give him/her 3 chances to offer the best price. Have them write it down on their business card. Don't answer questions about financing, how much you're willing to pay per month, etc. Just be straight up and ask, "What is your best price on this vehicle?"

Be prepared for their antics. They're good at dodging your questions and changing the subject to something else. If you get a sense that they're dodging the question, you can can politely tell them that you're willing to work with someone else if they don't want to cooperate. "Do you have someone else that is more open to helping me or should I take my business elsewhere?" It's your money so make sure you get what you want at the price you want. If the deal is good today, it's good tomorrow. When you're ready to sign, go towards the end of the month when they're trying to make their quota. You might be able to get it at a few hundred above cost. Beware of the extras they try to sell you afterwards.

Back in the day, my buddy called me out of the blue asking how much chrome rims cost. I told him that varies based on the size and type of rims. It turned out he was at a dealership buying a car. He got the car for $200 over cost (His credit card company gave that info to him; pre-internet days). However, he paid $1000 for chrome rims. They were just a chrome version of the stock rims. He also paid $250 for floor mats and mud guards. In essence, he got a good deal on the car, but was taken to the cleaners on all the extras.

Good luck and let us know what you end up getting with which options and price.

First of all, do not use the EPA gas mileage figures because the city numbers are a bit high, the highway numbers a bit low. The Consumer Reports city and highway data are better, but forget CR's overall number, which can be misleading.

CR found the Elantra sedan did 39 hwy, 20 city, while the Mazda 3 Skyactiv sedan did 43/22, despite weighing 150 lbs. more and accelerating a trifle faster. If you want something along the lines of a small SUV or minivan, the Mazda 5 is well worth considering but gets worse mileage because it's quite a bit heavier and has last year's non-Skyactiv powertrain.

Mazdas have long been very reliable, even back when Hyundai was known for making junk that fell apart quickly.

gooddealie said:   rshaslam said:   How do you wear out a 2001 Toyoto in 12 years?
Was it due to lack of maintenance or something?
No actually I maintained it regularly - until recently I took it to the dealership, even for oil changes. So it wasn't a poor maintenance thing. Typically oil changes were done every 4,000 miles, and I checked and topped up the oil every week.

The 2001 Corollas are 8th generation Corollas, and it is EXTREMELY common for this generation of Corolla to burn oil with no sign of leaks or smoke. The oil consumption problem was only fixed between 2002-2003 (there were several issues). Toyota has known for years and years about this defect in this generation of Corolla, but they never issued a recall.

The most common causes for the oil burning are stuck piston rings, followed by leaky valve stem seals. Both are extremely $$$$$ to fix. In most cases, an engine re-build is required.

I've been told that when Toyota built the engines they put smaller pistons in the engine than what should of been in there and just put in oversized rings to compensate. They did this to make the initial startup and break in easier. Well after a certain number of miles the rings start wearing down and then the oil consumption starts and it only gets worse. I also heard another explanation - that Toyota used a ring provider that gave them less than good piston rings and a lot of them broke quite early. Regardless of which explanation is correct, I strongly suspect the rings in the engine of my car are worn and sticking. My car has about 170,000 miles. It started drinking oil noticeably around 120,000 miles.... slowly, at first. Now it needs about a quart about every 7-800 miles or so.

Once an engine begings to burn oil, residue and excess carbon that is developed as a result of oil in the combustion chamber, begins to build up. The carbon build up causes a lot of other problems, and it accelerates the oil consumption. Without getting too detailed, the carbon is leaving residue and coating other components. I just had to replace the spark plugs and the oxygen sensors - and they were coated in a white ash. Thank goodness the catalytic converter wasn't poisoned - that could have been a pricey possibility. Additionally, the engine has developed a rattle that's beginning to become more noticeable, at least to me. That's probably not good, and whatever is causing it (I've had different mechanics render different opinions), the only real solution is probably going to be an engine re-build, which makes very poor financial sense. So... my that is why my current vehicle is on borrowed time, and it's time to bite the bullet and get a new car.
I have a feeling piston ring problems aren't nearly as common now, due to all the concerns about meeting strict pollution requirements over a very long period. One change because of that has been new engines have very low tension piston rings, and somewhere I read that Ford's produce 80% less friction than those used in the 1990s or a decade ago.

WhyAskWhy said:   I prefer Mazda as well. Maybe check into Camry or Accord. I bought my new Honda Accord 4 cy LX with some upgrade for under 24K out of the door. 100% finance at 0.9% for 5 yrs. The insurance on Camry or Accord sometimes is cheaper than the smaller car.

That's high for the accord. What city/state did you make the purchase. Around these woods these babies can be had for around 18k, and under 20k out the door. Accords are being advertised for $3,000-4,000 under msrp, and there maybe an additional dealer incentive of up to $2,000 that might not be fully accounted.

uutxs said:   gooddealie said:   I realize the wisdom of selling my car privately, but I don't have another vehicle I can borrow until I purchase the new one (I have no alternative for commuting and I sometimes need a car for work). I'm not sure I want to deal with renting, and the cost may eat up a lot of the selling price difference.
You buy the new one first and then sell (privately) the current car.


He has no money to put down. The trade in to the dealer is his down payment.

What's the insurance premium difference in the 2?

Skipping 72 Messages...
Today I bought my new car.

I ended up going for a Camry SE (4 cyl.) with the convenience, leather, navigation, and moonroof packages, as well as paint protection film, window tinting and the carpeted floor and trunk mats. It's really nicely equipped and I love how it drives. I got an amazing deal ($4,091 off MSRP) by requesting internet prices and getting quotes emailed to me. I did my haggling and agreed to the final price by email before setting foot on the dealership lot. Because of that and the fact I secured my financing from my bank beforehand and a quote to purchase my vehicle from CarMax beforehand, I was able to get in and out of the dealership in about 2 hours when I went down to sign the papers. It turned out to be a very low stress way to buy a car and I know I got a really good deal. So far, so good - I'm really happy with my purchase.

Thank you all for your help and suggestions.



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