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oops, double post

lousygolfer (Jun. 21, 2012 @ 3:59p) |

and that is why starclucks is so profitable, they have the masses not only paying more for what I consider bad coffee pr... (more)

Mickie3 (Jun. 21, 2012 @ 5:30p) |

Thanks Brettdoc.

I was a little surprised to see a standard for tattoo artists, too. They do make FAR more than minimum ... (more)

Lucky1Lxe (Jun. 22, 2012 @ 11:24a) |


I'm sorry but some of the tipping guides are so out of touch with reality. Consider the barista tipping guide of $1 per drink (the same goes for bartenders serving a beer), even IF they were paid just over $2 per hour that would put them in the $20 - $25 per hour for serving 20 drinks an hour; and most of that income will not be declared. Most baristas I know are happy with fifty cents per drink and usually less.

Really bad advice. Tip the owner of a hair salon ? Ummm ... Thats the owner ??
Super exceptional service, maybe ?!?!

Tip waiter "No less than 10% for poor service"


I don't tip on tax!

dssproxy said:   I don't tip on tax!

That was one thing they did get right, TIP Pre-TAX. Also don't add an additional tip on tabs where the gratuity has been added to the total. Personally I think this hurts the business more than it helps.

My tip: get with rest of the civilized world, end the tipping practice.

Why do they not cover how much to "tip" the counter help at McD's, et. al. No different than anyone else who works behind a counter, say StarClucks, is there? Guess I better start "tip"ping the clerk at the 7/11 a buck or so next time I stop in for a Pepsi.

Keep in mind the source. They want people in hospitality services to get paid more.

owenscott said:   Really bad advice. Tip the owner of a hair salon ? Ummm ... Thats the owner ??
Super exceptional service, maybe ?!?!


You don't tip because of good service.
Rather, you tip because you don't want bad service NEXT time!
Therefore, I do tip the owner of the hair salon who cuts my hair!
He has a tip jar right in front of my face all the time he is cutting my hair.
He expects a tip.

mr. pink didn't tip.

and he survived.

"Tip a washroom attendant $1"

Why on earth does such an occupation exist? Washroom attendants are the most annoyingly useless sort of employee I can imagine - does anyone really need someone to save them the extra 3' of reaching to get a paper towel after washing one's hands?

sloppy1 said:   owenscott said:   Really bad advice. Tip the owner of a hair salon ? Ummm ... Thats the owner ??
Super exceptional service, maybe ?!?!


You don't tip because of good service.
Rather, you tip because you don't want bad service NEXT time!
Therefore, I do tip the owner of the hair salon who cuts my hair!
He has a tip jar right in front of my face all the time he is cutting my hair.
He expects a tip.


This is kind of misleading, since the owner is also the stylist. I feel like the site was implying that you tip the owner in addition to the stylist.

"Why tip someone for a job I'm capable of doing myself? I can deliver food. I can drive a taxi. I can, and do, cut my own hair. I did however, tip my urologist, because I am unable to pulverize my own kidney stones."


The Engine Oil Industry Guide to Oil Change Frequency says you should change your oil every 50 miles or 2 hours, whichever is sooner.

Usorry said:   Keep in mind the source. They want people in hospitality services to get paid more.

Any way except for their employers to actually pay them more.

I always assumed that the shampooer got cut in on the tip I gave my stylist after my cut. Are people really expected to dig out cash in the middle of the process, or hunt down the other workers if they get passed around at the sallon? Lame.
I'd also be interested in knowing the appropriate tip for buffets. I always leave something, but sometimes even 15% seems a bit high, when all they do is bus and maybe bring a beverage.

First post..bad day at work, so I thought I would blow off some steam. I have two fundamental reasons as why I don't pay tips based on a set percentage.

The first. Customers A and B go into a restaurant to have a meal. They sit together, so the service is the same. Customer A orders a sirloin steak w/sides for $15 and customer B orders a new york strip w/sides for $20. They both have water. The work by the wait person/server is exactly the same. Based on a 20% tip, customer A pays $3.00 for a tip and customer B pays $4 for the exact same service provided or 33% more than customer A.

The second. Price increases (inflation) automatically create higher tips for the wait staff. If you went to Outback steakhouse 12 months ago and bought a meal at $18 and this week you pay $20 for the same meal, you will pay 40 cents more for the same service with a 20% tip. I know this isn't a lot on it's own, but depending on how much you eat out, it definitely adds up over time.

Christmas tips for salon services. Most websites recommend one service price for a holiday tip. My manicurist told me she has 200 regular customers. $20 x 200 = $4000. !!! Nobody in a regular job even gets a party any more.

Pay your employees more so we don't have to, deadbeats!

I usually tip well at restaurant if the service is good, but after reading that guide and seeing all of the jobs that expect a hand out...I feel like never tipping again. I am a middle school teacher and a very good one at that, and nobody tips me...as a matter of fact, I am somewhat underpaid. I say lets just quit tipping and raise their wages...tips should be reserved for exceptionally good service. Service that goes well beyond the normal requirements of the job. Heck, several of the jobs listed in the guide are things that I could easily do and would prefer to do myself such as loading bags into a cab. Would you honestly pay someone to put your suitcase in a trunk? I wouldn't even pay a dollar for that...it takes like 5 seconds.

I would rather get good service in a restaurant and tip for it than have the waitstaff be paid more. If restaurants paid their waitstaff more the food would be much more expensive. Also the service would not be nearly as good because the incentive for the waiter to do a great job would not be there.

Also as far as complaining about tipping on a percentage when prices go up I would just say to that is don't you expect a raise every year?

I am tired of the obligatory tip jar everywhere I go these days. The dry cleaner, take-out joint, what have you. I feel that all of these people who make an actual hourly wage and still have their hands out turn off the general public from tipping those who deserve it, your wait staff and bartenders.

I'd also be interested in knowing the appropriate tip for buffets. I always leave something, but sometimes even 15% seems a bit high, when all they do is bus and maybe bring a beverage.
I was always told 8% for buffets

cheepazzsob said:   First post..bad day at work, so I thought I would blow off some steam. I have two fundamental reasons as why I don't pay tips based on a set percentage.

The first. Customers A and B go into a restaurant to have a meal. They sit together, so the service is the same. Customer A orders a sirloin steak w/sides for $15 and customer B orders a new york strip w/sides for $20. They both have water. The work by the wait person/server is exactly the same. Based on a 20% tip, customer A pays $3.00 for a tip and customer B pays $4 for the exact same service provided or 33% more than customer A.

The second. Price increases (inflation) automatically create higher tips for the wait staff. If you went to Outback steakhouse 12 months ago and bought a meal at $18 and this week you pay $20 for the same meal, you will pay 40 cents more for the same service with a 20% tip. I know this isn't a lot on it's own, but depending on how much you eat out, it definitely adds up over time.


I assume you have never worked in the service industry.

Get a job at a restaurant, it may change your view, and not only will you stop tipping, you may even stop eating out... (stuff picked up off the floor, cooks not washing hands after bathroom breaks, people picking their noses right above the food... )

I always wondered what is the right tip for a restaurant that's between fast food and full service, where you'd walk in, order at the register/counter, get a number, food is brought to you, and bussed when you're done eating. Whenever I pay with a credit card when ordering, I'd occasionally leave $1 on the tip line. Too much? Too little?

What about tipping for a to-go order at a sit-down restaurant?

They say you should tip your tatoo artist 15-20%.

Do tatoo artists make minimum wage?

jerosen said:   They say you should tip your tatoo artist 15-20%.

Do tatoo artists make minimum wage?


Clearly we need to teach English teachers more

blueiedgod said:   cheepazzsob said:   First post..bad day at work, so I thought I would blow off some steam. I have two fundamental reasons as why I don't pay tips based on a set percentage.

The first. Customers A and B go into a restaurant to have a meal. They sit together, so the service is the same. Customer A orders a sirloin steak w/sides for $15 and customer B orders a new york strip w/sides for $20. They both have water. The work by the wait person/server is exactly the same. Based on a 20% tip, customer A pays $3.00 for a tip and customer B pays $4 for the exact same service provided or 33% more than customer A.

The second. Price increases (inflation) automatically create higher tips for the wait staff. If you went to Outback steakhouse 12 months ago and bought a meal at $18 and this week you pay $20 for the same meal, you will pay 40 cents more for the same service with a 20% tip. I know this isn't a lot on it's own, but depending on how much you eat out, it definitely adds up over time.


I assume you have never worked in the service industry.

Get a job at a restaurant, it may change your view, and not only will you stop tipping, you may even stop eating out... (stuff picked up off the floor, cooks not washing hands after bathroom breaks, people picking their noses right above the food... )


With all due respect, I'm not advocating not leaving a tip. I'm just saying it's a little outrageous to use a fixed percentage for "good" service, when it is what I expect to begin with. 25+ years ago, 10% was considered the norm for good service. About fifteen to twenty years ago, that number went to 15%. Now we are told 20-25% should be the tip for good service. The "industry" keeps recommending a higher percentage to be paid, when the increase is already built in by price hikes of the product..... And I did work in a restaurant when I was young and decided that it wasn't for me.

cheepazzsob said:   blueiedgod said:   cheepazzsob said:   First post..bad day at work, so I thought I would blow off some steam. I have two fundamental reasons as why I don't pay tips based on a set percentage.

The first. Customers A and B go into a restaurant to have a meal. They sit together, so the service is the same. Customer A orders a sirloin steak w/sides for $15 and customer B orders a new york strip w/sides for $20. They both have water. The work by the wait person/server is exactly the same. Based on a 20% tip, customer A pays $3.00 for a tip and customer B pays $4 for the exact same service provided or 33% more than customer A.

The second. Price increases (inflation) automatically create higher tips for the wait staff. If you went to Outback steakhouse 12 months ago and bought a meal at $18 and this week you pay $20 for the same meal, you will pay 40 cents more for the same service with a 20% tip. I know this isn't a lot on it's own, but depending on how much you eat out, it definitely adds up over time.


I assume you have never worked in the service industry.

Get a job at a restaurant, it may change your view, and not only will you stop tipping, you may even stop eating out... (stuff picked up off the floor, cooks not washing hands after bathroom breaks, people picking their noses right above the food... )


With all due respect, I'm not advocating not leaving a tip. I'm just saying it's a little outrageous to use a fixed percentage for "good" service, when it is what I expect to begin with. 25+ years ago, 10% was considered the norm for good service. About fifteen to twenty years ago, that number went to 15%. Now we are told 20-25% should be the tip for good service. The "industry" keeps recommending a higher percentage to be paid, when the increase is already built in by price hikes of the product..... And I did work in a restaurant when I was young and decided that it wasn't for me.


I worked as a bus boy, waiter and bartender at a Catskill's resort in the summers all the way from High School through college. I was paid $2.50/hour and then they charged $10/day for room a board (lived at the resort), so I was paid pretty much nothing. Tips were the only source of real income, not the paycheck.

And as much as people don't want to stereotype, there are some generalities that everyone drew about people and their "thriftiness." However, in general, bad tippers and good tippers averaged out.

I consider my self a pretty good tipper, because I know what a server has to go through to get you that meal. Most people have this perception of a restaurant that they see on TV "reality shows" but the reality is such that you almost have to speak a number of languages to communicate with the kitchen staff, and you have to know what goes where, because the "cook" here today is a jail bird tomorrow, and the "cook" tomorrow was shooting up heroin up his vein day before...

At the end of the day, if you can afford a $50 steak dinner, then $7.50 - $10 is much lesser burden for you than the same $10 to someone buying their dinner off the dollar menu at McDonalds. And if the $10 tip is going to break the wallet, perhaps you (not meaning literally you, but genrally, people) were not in the position to afford the $50 dinner.

callenjr said:   I am tired of the obligatory tip jar everywhere I go these days. The dry cleaner, take-out joint, what have you. I feel that all of these people who make an actual hourly wage and still have their hands out turn off the general public from tipping those who deserve it, your wait staff and bartenders.

agree there...it's obnoxious.

the ONLY place that has the right to a tip jar is a coffee/donut shoppe (Dunkin/Starbucks, etc) where it's been customary for many, many years, but I have to tip the dry cleaner? the bartender at an open bar (not a cash bar) at a wedding?

As I always say..."you wanna tip?"....bet number 8 in the 4th race at Belmont!

cheepazzsob said:   With all due respect, I'm not advocating not leaving a tip. I'm just saying it's a little outrageous to use a fixed percentage for "good" service, when it is what I expect to begin with. 25+ years ago, 10% was considered the norm for good service. About fifteen to twenty years ago, that number went to 15%. Now we are told 20-25% should be the tip for good service. The "industry" keeps recommending a higher percentage to be paid, when the increase is already built in by price hikes of the product..... And I did work in a restaurant when I was young and decided that it wasn't for me.

Here's why percentage of bill is a ridiculous means of calculating a tip:

Table A: $ 80 filet mignon - @ $40ea. x 2
$120 bottle of Duckhorn cabernet sauvignon
$200 Total
$ 40 Tip @ 20%

Table B: $ 12 shrimp appetizer
$ 14 soup @ $7ea x 2
$ 21 mushroom ravioli
$ 18 Caesar salad with shrimp
$ 16 creme brulee @ $8 x 2
$ 54 frozen dacqueries and mudslides @ $9 ea. x 6
$135 Total
$ 27 Tip @ 20%

Table B will require more than double the numbers of trips and total service time from the server as Table A and will require >10x as much bartender time (bartenders HATE frozen drinks because they take so long to make), yet its server gets only 2/3 of the tip that Table A's server receives. How on earth is that fair? Let's change it a bit and say that Table B is at an Applebees or Chilis and if they order typical dishes there, the tab for Table B will be half of Table A's bill at the nicer restaurant and in all likelihood, Table B is tipping 15%, too. So Server A gets a $40 tip for doing well under half the work of what Server B does for $15.

oops, double post

MISTERCHEAP said:   callenjr said:   I am tired of the obligatory tip jar everywhere I go these days. The dry cleaner, take-out joint, what have you. I feel that all of these people who make an actual hourly wage and still have their hands out turn off the general public from tipping those who deserve it, your wait staff and bartenders.

agree there...it's obnoxious.

the ONLY place that has the right to a tip jar is a coffee/donut shoppe (Dunkin/Starbucks, etc) where it's been customary for many, many years, but I have to tip the dry cleaner? the bartender at an open bar (not a cash bar) at a wedding?

As I always say..."you wanna tip?"....bet number 8 in the 4th race at Belmont!


and that is why starclucks is so profitable, they have the masses not only paying more for what I consider bad coffee products (there are much better places around here than them!) AND they have you paying even more as they can underpay their staff and the public will make up for it! What a business model!!

As to the folks behind the counter doing anything special, the coffee shops are no different than anywhere else where someone works behind a counter, they had across what you pay for, no more, no less. If you "tip" at a coffee shop, do you tip at an ice cream shop? Ice creams are as difficult coffee mixes are they not?

Thanks Brettdoc.

I was a little surprised to see a standard for tattoo artists, too. They do make FAR more than minimum wage (when I'm coughing up over $100 per hour on average, I don't care how much the overhead is (and I have an idea),unless they are still an apprentice,they are making good money).
I have over a dozen tattoos, and I've tipped the artists I thought gave me a relatively good deal, did nice custom work, or that I may possibly go back to, 10-15%. There are a couple that didn't get anything over the quote, and I don't feel bad about that one bit (especially when I find I can get higher caliber for considerably less cost by travelling a little bit).
I pretty much feel the same about hair stylists (but they have to be really bad to not get a tip).



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