Anyone ever use ecoatm?

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EcoATM

Seemed like a good idea but it says it wants a driver's license and thumbprint. Not sure I want to do that for what will probably be a dollar fifty.

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no, looks interesting though, it would be nice if they gave you some idea online on what stuff might be worth rather than having to take it to the location

JamesTKirk said:   EcoATM

Seemed like a good idea but it says it wants a driver's license and thumbprint. Not sure I want to do that for what will probably be a dollar fifty.

It states that "ecoATM guards your privacy and safely encrypts all personal data", but who know?

Do not give them that info.

Edit:

I see I am getting red for this, but the fact is that you should not give them this info.

You have no idea who they are. You have no idea how secure the database they are using is, even if they are honest. You have no idea what type of fingerprint they store (there are many ways to electronically register a fingerprint). etc.

Your drivers license is almost as important as your fingerprint, these days.

SteveG

My name is Ryan Kuder and I'm Director of Marketing for ecoATM. We collect drivers license and thumbprint info to ensure that the person selling us the phone is who they say they are. It helps prevent people from selling us stolen phones. We do not use the data for anything unless we need to access it to comply with law enforcement in a stolen phone investigation. So if you're selling us YOUR phone, you're safe. But if you're trying to sell us a phone you stole, you'll probably be caught.

Happy to answer any other questions about ecoATM.

Thanks,
Ryan

rkuder said:   My name is Ryan Kuder and I'm Director of Marketing for ecoATM. We collect drivers license and thumbprint info to ensure that the person selling us the phone is who they say they are. It helps prevent people from selling us stolen phones. We do not use the data for anything unless we need to access it to comply with law enforcement in a stolen phone investigation. So if you're selling us YOUR phone, you're safe. But if you're trying to sell us a phone you stole, you'll probably be caught.

Happy to answer any other questions about ecoATM.

Thanks,
Ryan


Ryan,

I was interested, but You are asking too much information for the line of business you are in. Its a stolen cell phone not armed robbery!, Law Enforcement can have it remotely disabled, Your website says it is required by law enforcement that you gather that information, that is BS. If you give me your driver's license information and your thumb print, social security number and a sample of your DNA, then maybe I'll give you my DL and thumbprint.

You are only asking that information so you don't get stuck with a stolen phone, TMI buddy.


Good luck with your startup.

Actually, it's not BS, it's SHD--Second Hand Dealer laws. In order to buy and sell used goods, you need to be licensed and comply with local regulations. Anyone who buys used goods from someone and resells them to someone else has to do the same things--pawn shops for example. They have to check your ID and note it and in many cases collect your thumbprint, just like we do. Another thing is that anything we buy (and still the same is true for a pawn shop) has to be held for 30 days before it gets resold. There are other regulations as well with regards to reporting and compliance. These particular types of laws are called Second Hand Dealer laws and each city and state does them a bit differently. We've had to build our ecoATMs to allow us to comply with all of them, so we tend to be more strict than we have to in our efforts to curtail cell phone theft.

I think we've waived the sample DNA requirement, but some of our older kiosks still have the cheek swab kit...you know, just in case.

Hopefully that helps clear things up. You can also Google second hand dealer requirements for wherever you happen to live to learn more.

Ok, found one of these machines to check out. It was out of money so it didn't evaluate anything. However it could give prices for stuff.

It priced Mp3 players or phones.

Old Motorola c139 phone, $1.00

AT&T 16GB iPhone 4 offered $109.

These are prices for perfect condition. Price drops a lot for items not in perfect condition. I have no idea how machine evaluates condition. You could drop a phone in the toilet and it could certainly look perfect.

So, My friend gave me her iphone 2g to cash it in for her and she used her iphone for music and was not connected to any phone companies or whatever. We're both 16 and If i cash it in for her I'm afraid the machine will think I stole the phone or something, should I try it anyway or should I just tell her to do it herself?

nzarate said:   So, My friend gave me her iphone 2g to cash it in for her and she used her iphone for music and was not connected to any phone companies or whatever. We're both 16 and If i cash it in for her I'm afraid the machine will think I stole the phone or something, should I try it anyway or should I just tell her to do it herself?

It asks for driver's license. Do you have one? If not, I guess you can't do it. I didn't see anything where you had to be 18.

If you're sure the phone is not stolen, I don't think you need to worry. I would check prices on eBay and craigslist before accepting whatever price this machine offers.

Pawn shops look at DL you make copies Ryan. How secure is your machine/database? That was the point of the above poster.

I was given a quote of 75.00 bucks for a bb9810 the ATM read the phone as a 9800 series and wated to give me only 40 bucks what a rip off

I was given a quote of 75.00 bucks for a bb9810 the ATM read the phone as a 9800 series and wated to give me only 40 bucks what a rip off

youre retarded you have to use your id at pawn shops and every other place you sell your used stuff at, why would you not need it to sell a cell phone? retarded paranoid skeptics i swear to god.

youre retarded you have to use your id at pawn shops and every other place you sell your used stuff at, why would you not need it to sell a cell phone? retarded paranoid skeptics i swear to god.

The question about EcoATM's ability to secure the Personally Identifiable Information (PII) that they collect is very valid and EcoATM's response is unsatisfactory. They may not plan to divulge the personal information that they collect, but it doesn't mean that can't or won't happen. We have zero assurance that their security measures are adequate. Just saying that the information is "encrypted" is not a valid response. Have EcoATM's systems been been subjected to third-party penetration testing or evaluation? Does EcoATM perform background checks on all personnel? Do all personnel who design, implement, test, and operate your systems have IT security certifications? Does EcoATM outsource development to foreign nationals and lose supply-chain control? Are your systems and networks built from low-cost components made by Huawei or other Chinese manufacturers who build back doors into all of their equipment? Which security standards did you build to? Have you been audited? I don't see any third-party security validations (like Verisign, etc.) on their site. The questions go on and on.

Corporations are hacked successfully on a daily basis. Those successful hacks result typically from 1) poor personnel security procedures and actions by poorly trained users, 2) poorly tested security control implementations, 3) ineffective risk management, 4) cost saving efforts that short-change security because executive managers don't understand IT security and think compromise won't happen to them, 5) zero-day exploits and companies who fail to patch their systems. The list goes on, but those are the top five.

EcoATM collects enough information to enable identity theft if that information is compromised. If EcoATM's systems are hacked, they get some bad publicity and publish the usual promises to do better next time. But potentially thousands of people will be impacted by identity theft with all the costs and the years-long nightmare that goes with that.

So, EcoATM, you can either get serious about giving your customers assurance or you can lose those customers. I was planning to bring multiple used smartphones to one of your kiosks today, but I definitely won't do that now. Zero assurance means Zero business. EcoATM's investors should be very concerned about their casual approach to security and assurance. CoinStar is one of EcoATM's largest shareholders, but CoinStar kiosks don't ask for personal information. Each business model is different and you can't use a generic security plan to secure EcoATM's operations.

I can't link the article (paid subscription) Police fear cellphone recycling kiosks encourage theft

It says there is a lot of stolen phones being deposited at these.



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