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Is the Ziploc Versaloc brand considered the same type of 'thin' glass products?

ablang (Dec. 25, 2012 @ 8:58a) |

I have used pyrex for years. I simply place hot pyrex pans on a cloth.
a pad, or some other pot holder. works like a char... (more)

DaysFan (Dec. 25, 2012 @ 10:59a) |

FWIW, World Kitchen's FAQ on Pyrex. According to them the soda lime composition has been in use for quite some time now... (more)

comprx (Dec. 26, 2012 @ 6:28a) |

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"a large Pyrex measuring cup broke when he poured boiling water in it to make tea"

hmmmm, cold cup + boiling water...no problem there


For some reason I've never had one explode, maybe because I actually treat it like glass?

lordoffire said:   "a large Pyrex measuring cup broke when he poured boiling water in it to make tea"

hmmmm, cold cup + boiling water...no problem there


For some reason I've never had one explode, maybe because I actually treat it like glass?


no lof, a room temperature Pyrex. They are supposed to tolerate high heat, and yes, some recipes do call for boiling water (measured), so that's why people have these around.

MISTERCHEAP said:   lordoffire said:   "a large Pyrex measuring cup broke when he poured boiling water in it to make tea"

hmmmm, cold cup + boiling water...no problem there


For some reason I've never had one explode, maybe because I actually treat it like glass?


no lof, a room temperature Pyrex. They are supposed to tolerate high heat, and yes, some recipes do call for boiling water (measured), so that's why people have these around.


I USE THEM ALL THE TIME, and yes, new ones that were cheap/free at Kohls AC


but it didn't "say" it was at at least room temperature....right now I can go pick one up and it would not be at room temperature, it would feel colder...if I poured boiling water right into that, it would probably shatter...they're meant for high temps but not for drastic temp changes

any glass or ceramic dish can have it happen

I heated up a chunk (yes, literally a chunk) of glass with a lighter when I was a young lad and promptly placed it into some luke-warm water and it exploded.

It's possible that they make the newer ones thinner. It's possible that they messed with the ingredients, to save a few bucks. It's possible that the consumer had scratched/chipped their glassware prior to the shattering incident. I, for one, have a mixture of newer and older stuff (from goodwill, which is thoroughly used) and have not used them on the stove or under a broiler. They haven't shattered yet, so it leaves me wondering whether it's user error or manufacturer defect. We may never know (but it was probably user defect).

Last year, I had quite a day with my beloved glass cookware. First I dropped my large visions pan approx. 1 foot into the sink & it broke into a few pieces. I learned that years of scouring pads and heating/cooling cycles, weaken the glass.
Then I took my blue glass (I can't recall the brand) baking pan & put it on the burner. I put some oil & a semi-frozen piece of chicken in it. A few minutes of heating & the pan exploded. Pieces of glass went everywhere. I was 10 feet away & god only knows how I was left untouched. The chicken was now sitting directly on the burner, & the oil was nowhere to be found. It was like a magic trick. I later learned about thermal shock & the importance of not having anything cold in the pan when you heat it. I then bought a stainless steel copper core pan from Kohls w/coupon.

sackoloot said:   
Then I took my blue glass (I can't recall the brand) baking pan & put it on the burner.


By burner I assume you mean stovetop.

http://msnbcmedia.msn.com/j/MSNBC/Components/Photo/_new/121212-p...

User error.

The reality is that people don't read the instructions they come with or even do the research before assuming that it's safe to do things and just throw these glass trays in the oven or on the stove.

It's like the crowd complaining that their kids are swallowing bucky balls, personal responsibility in this country is nonexistent.

If we want to really control our population numbers, just remove all safety instructions and warning labels, people ignore them anyways...

Read that the pyrex in Europe is safer than that in the US? Not sure why but I know they changed the way they make pyrex here - something about Soda Lime being used now, so the newer pyrex is not as strong as the older version.

old pyrex was borosilicate glass - glass made out of sand + boron oxide = 'borosilicate glass'
new pyrex is made out of sand + sodium carbonate because it's much cheaper = 'soda glass'

borosilicate glass does not change volume much when its temperature changes, but soda glass does. So when you make rapid uneven temp changes in borosilicate glass, not much happens at normal temps. But with soda glass, the part that is hotter or cooler than the rest of the piece gets significantly bigger (hot) or smaller (cool) and the whole thing goes *boom*.

Sometimes all it takes with soda glass is to put something from the oven onto a couple of drops of water on the stove top. The water cools off a small piece of the glass pan and the whole thing shatters.

too many recent reports of Pyrex glass shattering indicates there has been a change from years ago, when it was made of borosilicate type glass. in chemistry labs, we would heat solutions in Pyrex beakers, flasks, directly with Bunsen burners and never had problems. of course, thermal shock can shatter any ceramic, including borosilicate but it seems easier now.

soda lime type silica glass is just ordinary glass like in window panes.

This topic comes up whenever a newbie posts a deal for "Pyrex" cookware. The fact that shattering cookware is occurring more frequently does not come as a shock since Corning is no longer in the cookware business (licensing "Pyrex" brand name to World Kitchens) and Anchor Hocking who was the remaining U.S.A. maker of borosilicate cookware, switched to soda lime silica about a year or two ago.

As they say in the article "Pyrex is not your grandmother's pyrex". Do not go by brand name. Pyrex and Anchor Hocking are no longer safe brands to buy. Check and verify that the glass cookware is made from borosilicate.

Edit: "World Kitchens" should be "World Kitchen".

I think it has more to do with the fact that the users have less knowledge of cooking or physics than in the past. If you missed out on all the warnings in high school physics, at least your mother used to tell you what vessel to use to make tea.

I'd also say that more people have a place to report these things easily these days and everyone thinks dumping hot coffee in their lap is the same as hitting the lottery.

I guess we need to put a sticker on everything that is not a tea kettle warning morons, "This is not a tea kettle!"


EradicateSpam said:   www.consumerreports.org/cro/magazine-archive/2011/january/home-g...[/

I had a very similar experience. It was like a bomb went off - glass flew everywhere. I won't buy that stuff again.

For what it's worth, a co-worker and me had a conversation a while back, and I assume we both have/had the old stuff. We both agreed, based on experiences that sometimes when you drop or bang one of these on something, nothing happens. Then, at some point in the future you might do something like just pick it up and it shatters or falls apart, like the drop or bang was programmed into it.
Thanks to everyone that educated us that the new stuff is not the same as the old stuff.

Time to included some science!

Pyrex(made by World Kitchen), used to be made out of borosilicate glass. Adding Boron to the glass changes the atomic structure in a way that drastically reduces how much the material warps due to changes in temperature. This is what allowed the old pyrex to be advertised as going from the fridge to the oven safely. For over a decade now, World Kitchen has changed the Pyrex recipe to use pre-stressed Soda Lime glass, most likely because it's cheaper. The new formula hardens under stress, so that it resists breaking from bumps more than borosilicate, but it loses all of the thermal benefits of borosilicate and can't withstand rapid changes in temperature. For those laughing at the people who had theirs shatter like they didn't know what they were doing, they probably grew up with the old recipe and didn't know that the company changed to a cheaper and less durable version. The whole point of Pyrex used to be the ability to withstand the quick temperature changes associated with use in a kitchen!!!

Side note: Since borosilicate Pyrex is no longer readily available, illicit drug labs have begun stealing beakers from lab supply stores as soda lime glass will break above a gas burner.

My understanding of the change is that the drug guys were using it. The new version is unsuitable for drug production but it also isn't as good in the kitchen.

txdeuce said:   ...For over a decade now, World Kitchen has changed the Pyrex recipe to use pre-stressed Soda Lime glass, most likely because it's cheaper....One of the articles I read mentioned the cost of meeting new environmental/pollution regulations as the main factor for discontinuing borosilicate glass.

Kitchen Calamities said: Such incidents are rare, but reports of glassware abruptly shattering have climbed sharply in recent years, NBC News has learned. And a controversy is heating up over whether the pans or the users are to blame.

No pun intended

Excuse me, but this thread is about safety. There is a big difference between not using a hair dryer in the shower & not pouring boiling water in a microwave safe glass cup. The important things to know is that this stuff can be dangerous, even the old stuff. I bought my Frying fan in 1990, and it already had a chip in it. I had dropped my pan a few times, and put many tiny scratches in it. The commercials from Visions showed them melting an aluminum pan inside the Visions pan, from a blow torch applied to the bottom of the Visions pan. Then they banged the Visions pan on a counter top. I believe they did not know the long term effects of small amounts of abuse coupled with normal use.

gkimber2 said:   old pyrex was borosilicate glass - glass made out of sand + boron oxide = 'borosilicate glass'
new pyrex is made out of sand + sodium carbonate because it's much cheaper = 'soda glass'

borosilicate glass does not change volume much when its temperature changes, but soda glass does. So when you make rapid uneven temp changes in borosilicate glass, not much happens at normal temps. But with soda glass, the part that is hotter or cooler than the rest of the piece gets significantly bigger (hot) or smaller (cool) and the whole thing goes *boom*.

Sometimes all it takes with soda glass is to put something from the oven onto a couple of drops of water on the stove top. The water cools off a small piece of the glass pan and the whole thing shatters.


I read where some people are looking for the old Pyrex cookware at flea markets and garage sales because of what you posted. I would.

Is the Ziploc Versaloc brand considered the same type of 'thin' glass products?

I have used pyrex for years. I simply place hot pyrex pans on a cloth.
a pad, or some other pot holder. works like a charm.

FWIW, World Kitchen's FAQ on Pyrex. According to them the soda lime composition has been in use for quite some time now.

If you want borosilicate, www.amazon.co.uk is one place to get it.



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