Basic, No Frills, Quiet Dishwasher

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I am remodeling my kitchen and will be replacing my reliable white 18 year old Whirlpool dishwasher with a stainless steel one. From my preliminary research, the majority of what I read are complaints with dishwashers of today not getting dishes clean, wash cycles taking too long, sensors not working properly and water saving features a pain. Do basic, no frills, quiet, decent cycle length dishwashers exist and if so what are some good brands and models?

I went to a big box home improvement store and the most appliances they had in the clearance section were dishwashers and front load washing machines. Most were customer returns because they are marked "used." Guess that's proof a lot of people are dissatisfied with new, improved appliances these days.

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Selection bias. People don't post when the dishwasher gets the dishes clean.

Long before they took your lightbulbs away, the government took your phosphorus-laden dish detergent away. Back in the day, we lived better through chemicals.

And to your point, I often find consumersearch.com to be helpful.

I replaced a dishwasher last month, a dead Bosch with a new $480 Bosch, and SHE3ARsomething. I have no complaints with it. I cannot believe some people spend ~$2000 on a frickin' dishwasher.

ganda said:   I replaced a dishwasher last month, a dead Bosch with a new $480 Bosch, and SHE3ARsomething. I have no complaints with it. I cannot believe some people spend ~$2000 on a frickin' dishwasher.

hey now, v-day is coming soon

$2k is better spent on h+b

Miele ftw

I'll buy your old reliable dishwasher for $20.

Basic, No Frills, Quiet Dishwasher.
-----------------------------------------
mute wife.

low water usage = 99+ minute wash times and less clean dishes. I fail to see where using less water and more electricity actually saved my utility bill.

but silent is great - Even the most silent dishwasher could be a bit quieter. put additional sound deadening insulation (or staple fire retardant carpet squares) inside the cabinet space prior to installation. Check to make sure the things you want to wash will fit in it - take a pan with you when you look.

I've got a Bosch that we bought about 6 months ago that cost us in the $600-700 range if memory serves. If I had to do it all over again, I'd buy a KitchenAid.

At a given price point, Bosch dishwashers tend to be about as quiet as you can find. The way they accomplish this is to pack more insulation into the unit. In order to fit more insulation into the exterior shell of the unit, the interior, dishloading area has to be reduced in size. Bosch makes claims that their dishwashers load as many dishes as their competitors, but I believe these claims are misleading, if not outright disingenuous, as they might apply to a typical family's use. Yes, you can fit as many PLATES into a Bosch as any other brand, because the divider prongs are spaced very closely together. However, most parts of the dishwasher cannot readily stack anything deeper and wider than a very shallow soup bowl, so for deeper cereal bowls that readily stacked in my old dishwasher, I end up having to take up a lot more space. Similarly, the top rack has dividers that are too closely spaced and make it harder to fit in cups and smaller bowls. I found that our Bosch just isn't designed to load efficiently the broad range of sizes and shapes of dishwasher-safe items, other than plates, that a typical family uses everyday. Bosch fans in online reviews will chant "You just don't know how to load your Bosch properly!" in response to those who complain about the loadability of their dishwashers. Well, I'm a reasonably astute person, load the dishwasher as well as I believe can be done, and I'd love someone to show me just how ignorant I've been, as I doubt anyone else can fit more dishes into the dishwasher than I do, without piling them so close on top of each other that they will not be fully washed.

Bosch also touts lower utilities costs to operate their dishwashers, but again, I think that is somewhat misleading. I figure I'm washing about 20% fewer dishes per load than with my old dishwasher, so whatever savings in energy I'm getting per load probably equates to a wash (forgive the pun) on a cost-per-dish basis, since I'm running the dishwasher more frequently. Additionally, one of the ways that Bosch cuts electrical cost is to have a less effective drying cycle. The way I can always tell if the dishes in the dishwasher are clean or not is that about 80% of my glasses and cups will have water sitting on their upraised bottoms (not just a trace, but several tablespoons worth) after the wash is over, particularly if they are plastic.

FYI my old diswasher was a Frigidaire and while the storage/loading organization was well designed to hold a lot of dishes, the quality was poor - ours died after less than 5 years. I don't recommend that brand.

Have a look at Consumer Reports magazine - they've done at least one study of current dishwashers in the past 6 months or so.

Online access to their full ratings are subscription-only, but you can either spend 15 minutes looking at a hardcopy at a library (and some local libraries let their members see Consumer Reports magazine online, so you don't even have to go to the library building),
or you can search around on the internet for free articles by other journalists/publications and/or for free videos of random local-tv-news-broadcasts' consumer segements which list CR's top 2 or 3 brand and model choices (I can usually find those for most products that I'm looking up).

I agree with Lousygolfer about Bosch, got one a few years ago from a FW deal. Yes, it is quiet but would not buy one again. Used to have an old whirlpool and that did an awesome job, both cleaning and holding more dishes but was loud as hell. I scrub items before putting in the dishwasher and sometimes I have to clean the dishes twice. Never had to do that with the whirlpool. Don't know what I would buy if I had to buy again.

Thank you all for your helpful advice. I'll check out Consumer Reports at the library.

I've noticed that white dishwashers are considerably less expensive than stainless steel and come in a more "no frills" manner with less to go wrong, albeit at a higher decibel level. The dishwasher is going to be in a kitchen island. Would it look odd to have a new white dishwasher and then all other appliances in the kitchen stainless steel?

I wish I could paint my old, reliable Whirlpool from the 1990's stainless steel, but it certainly won't go in a new kitchen since cosmetically it has faded/yellowed from a bright white to an almond or bisque color, especially on the top near the handle and control panel.

Kitchenaid is whirlpool, so don't pay extra for the name alone.

Protip: If you want to know who makes an appliance, go to a parts store like SearsPartsDirect or anywhere on the web and look for spare parts. You can usually glean who makes the appliance from the spare part name.

For example, randomly picked a kitchenaid 24" tall tub, model KUDS30FXSS. Now lets search for a pump for this model. Searched and got the part number W10239404 on this page: http://www.searspartsdirect.com/partsdirect/part-number/W1023940... You can see on the lower left what other dishwashers use this part. Take the part number, throw it into google and we get http://www.amazon.com/Whirlpool-Part-Number-W10239404-ASSEMBLY/d... showing its a whirlpool

So pop quiz, how many dishwasher manufacturers are in the US market? Its not as many as you think.

(Oh and that $20 is serious if you're anywhere near central florida.)

Moby99 said:   I wish I could paint my old, reliable Whirlpool from the 1990's stainless steel, but it certainly won't go in a new kitchen since cosmetically it has faded/yellowed from a bright white to an almond or bisque color, especially on the top near the handle and control panel.


Is there a stick-on door panel you could get to cover the white with a stainless steel faux-front? I'm sure I've seen this kind of thing in the UK for some kitchen appliance.


Or could you attach a faux-cabinet door on it (that matches the rest of your cabinet fronts)?

Kandykornhead said:   Long before they took your lightbulbs away, the government took your phosphorus-laden dish detergent away.
Along with dead fish, poluted rivers and oceans.

Use Lemme Shine periodically for spotless glasses and dishes from your dishwasher - http://www.lemishine.com - available in most supermarkets.

Kandykornhead said:    Back in the day, we lived better through chemicals.
The same government who forced lead out of gasoline and paint, DDT from pesticides - living better through chemicals?

Moby99 said:   Thank you all for your helpful advice. I'll check out Consumer Reports at the library.

I've noticed that white dishwashers are considerably less expensive than stainless steel and come in a more "no frills" manner with less to go wrong, albeit at a higher decibel level. The dishwasher is going to be in a kitchen island. Would it look odd to have a new white dishwasher and then all other appliances in the kitchen stainless steel?

I wish I could paint my old, reliable Whirlpool from the 1990's stainless steel, but it certainly won't go in a new kitchen since cosmetically it has faded/yellowed from a bright white to an almond or bisque color, especially on the top near the handle and control panel.


We recently upgraded our kitchen, went with stainless steel fridge, range primarily stainless steel, with some black. Stainless steel used on dishwashers seemed quite flimsy, prone to dents and dings, ended up going with black.

While a basic, no frills dishwasher should do the job, we found that there is a BIG difference in performance with stainless steel interiors versus plastic, quieter models may take longer, but use less water, appear to do a MUCH better job. We spent the extra $200 for a higher end Kenmore from the local Sears Outlet (not quite sure if it is German or Korean) - WELL worth it.

shank said:   
The same government who forced lead out of gasoline and paint, DDT from pesticides - living better through chemicals?
Tens of millions would be alive today, instead of dead, were it not for the scientifically baseless ban on DDT. Silent Spring was a crock.

If dishwashers are supposed to be more energy efficient than 20 years ago, does the fact that a lot of them take 2 hours for a cycle actually cost the consumer more in energy use vs a less energy efficient unit from 20 years ago that only took 1 hour for a cycle?

It also seems like few dishwashers have an open (without plastic flip-up doors) silverware rack that is mounted in the door.



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