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We like to use canola or sunflower oil as its among the lowest in fat, saturated fat, and choloestrial for cooking. They are very pricy compared to oil cooking oils. We recently bought a 64 oz for $6.99 which I consider as expensive for cooking oil. Anyone know where I can buy them in bulk? No luck at Costco.

I believe Canola oil is indeed available at Costco and Sams etc and is dirt cheap. Something like 5 litre containers for $5 etc. I am completely positive it is available at Sams and believe I have seen it at Costco as well. Didn't look too close since we exclusively use Olive oil.

For sunflower oil, I don't know of a good source but can offer a suggestion. It is my understanding that it is frequently used in a lot of Chinese dishes. Your best bet would be to call a couple of mid-high end Chinese restaurants and request the info. Most decent places will point you to a good source, specially if you are eating there that evening!! The crappier chinese places (you know the $3.95 lunch special places) definitely don't use Sunflower oil but may still easily point you towards the right source. Or I guess, you could always hope for a FW'er of Chinese origin to point you in the right direction.

I know this board is all about getting deals, etc. but I can't help but wonder how much you could really save on an annual basis even if you halved the cost of your oil.

I guess if you're a heavy deep fryer?

A&P/Savacenter carries America's Choice canola and it is around $6.99 a gallon regular price. The other brand I use is LouAna, about the same price, I get it at Winn-Dixie.

I'm chinese and I can assure you that most chinese restaurant use lard for their cooking. The last thing on their mind is eating healthy. You ever wonder why the food taste so good? <img src="i/expressions/face-icon-small-happy.gif" border=0>

The only oil I could find in our Costco is just olive oil which is as healthy comparing to sunflower or canola. Gotta check out Sam's. Oil from the local market costs too much.

nina, never heard of A&P/Savacenter. I guess it's not in CA.


BimmerPilot said: [Q]I believe Canola oil is indeed available at Costco and Sams etc and is dirt cheap. Something like 5 litre containers for $5 etc. I am completely positive it is available at Sams and believe I have seen it at Costco as well. Didn't look too close since we exclusively use Olive oil.

For sunflower oil, I don't know of a good source but can offer a suggestion. It is my understanding that it is frequently used in a lot of Chinese dishes. Your best bet would be to call a couple of mid-high end Chinese restaurants and request the info. Most decent places will point you to a good source, specially if you are eating there that evening!! The crappier chinese places (you know the $3.95 lunch special places) definitely don't use Sunflower oil but may still easily point you towards the right source. Or I guess, you could always hope for a FW'er of Chinese origin to point you in the right direction.[/Q

optical said: [Q]I'm chinese and I can assure you that most chinese restaurant use lard for their cooking. The last thing on their mind is eating healthy. You ever wonder why the food taste so good? <img src="i/expressions/face-icon-small-happy.gif" border=0>

The only oil I could find in our Costco is just olive oil which is as healthy comparing to sunflower or canola. Gotta check out Sam's. Oil from the local market costs too much.

nina, never heard of A&P/Savacenter. I guess it's not in CA.


BimmerPilot said: [Q]I believe Canola oil is indeed available at Costco and Sams etc and is dirt cheap. Something like 5 litre containers for $5 etc. I am completely positive it is available at Sams and believe I have seen it at Costco as well. Didn't look too close since we exclusively use Olive oil.

For sunflower oil, I don't know of a good source but can offer a suggestion. It is my understanding that it is frequently used in a lot of Chinese dishes. Your best bet would be to call a couple of mid-high end Chinese restaurants and request the info. Most decent places will point you to a good source, specially if you are eating there that evening!! The crappier chinese places (you know the $3.95 lunch special places) definitely don't use Sunflower oil but may still easily point you towards the right source. Or I guess, you could always hope for a FW'er of Chinese origin to point you in the right direction.[/Q

I can assure you it isn't common for Chinese to cook with lard, because the Chinese didn't ever domesticate animals that produced cooking lard.

128 oz = 1 gallon so the other posters reply is a 50% saving. Commercial fryer oil for restaurants runs about $2.99 a gallon.

Plus, lard is poor for cooking at high heat. If I remember correctly, lard is used in some pastries. Perhaps moon cakes??? Anyway, at large Chinese markets, they will sell them in containers that hold about 5 gallons. Cheapest kind is probably soy bean oil as most Chinese do not even care what type of oil they purchase.

FunnyStuff said: [Q]Plus, lard is poor for cooking at high heat. If I remember correctly, lard is used in some pastries. Perhaps moon cakes??? Anyway, at large Chinese markets, they will sell them in containers that hold about 5 gallons. Cheapest kind is probably soy bean oil as most Chinese do not even care what type of oil they purchase.

Lard has a very low smoke point and would burn rapidly in stir fry. There may be some confusion with "Chinese" cooking and American/Chinese cuisine, which is very different. Vegetable oils are used heavily in Asia. Peanut oil is prized because of it's high smoke point. The smoke point is exactly that, the temperature at which a fat smokes. When it starts to smoke, it's starts to break down and burn. This will impart bad flavor to the food and lessen the life of the fat. Stir frying is done at a higher temperature than traditional deep fat frying, which is about 350-375 degrees F. Most commercial deep fat fryers will use very cheap fats, but since the temperature is regulated less than the smoke point it will work fine. These cheaper commercial fats are blended with the cheapest oils available, and the contents will vary seasonally. Fat does have a limited shelf life, and will eventually go rancid, especially after it's opened to air. For a home this shouldn't be a problem unless you buy several years worth of the stuff.

hmmm? lard in chinese cooking? never seen my parents cook with it. i've cooked with it in baked desserts and such, but never my parents.

FunnyStuff said: [Q]Plus, lard is poor for cooking at high heat. If I remember correctly, lard is used in some pastries. Perhaps moon cakes??? Anyway, at large Chinese markets, they will sell them in containers that hold about 5 gallons. Cheapest kind is probably soy bean oil as most Chinese do not even care what type of oil they purchase.

health conscious chinese do.

to OP: try restaurant supplies stores? In cali we have a chain called smart and final

PS I worked in my uncle's chinese restaurant and we didn't use lards.

dorkyden,

that's a good idea. i will chk with S&F. there's one locally here. For some reason, i get this image of reatuarant using that nasty stuff. Either way, I think most restaurant would not care if their oil is fatty or not - it's all about enhancing the taste.



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