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HOW TO CHOOSE A DIGITAL CAMERA THAT'S RIGHT FOR YOU:
====================================================

Being addicted to FW, I've seen enough posts that ask how to choose a digital camera. So I organized this guide in hopes that it will help people to find a digital camera that's right for them.


1) If you are new to digital photography, you should read some articles on what's important and how to choose a digital camera. I've seen good articles featured in CNET.com, ZDNet.com, PCMag.com, PCWorld.com, DCResource.com, DPReview.com, Megapixel.net (thanks MsAnn), and a bunch of other sites, especially since digital cameras are so popular now. If you need more sites, you can always Google for them! [*Optional for advanced users]

2) Read the reviews (expert & users):

www.dcresource.com
www.steves-digicams.com
www.dpreview.com
www.imaging-resource.com
www.megapixel.net
www.pcmag.com
reviews-zdnet.com.com
reviews.cnet.com
www.epinions.com/Digital_Cameras
www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/browse/-/281052/

Take reviews with a grain of salt... especially individual user reviews. One review may not be significant, but if you see a trend, THEN you should take that into consideration.

3) Ask your relatives and friends their opinions/advice/suggestions on digital cameras. Try not to be too swayed by their advice... what's right for them may not be what's right for you.

4) Go to Best Buy, Circuit City, CompUSA, Staples, Office Depot, OfficeMax and look at/play around with all their digital cameras. But take employees' advice with a grain of salt... they want to sell you something.

5) Narrow the down the choices to only those cameras that meet your technical requirements, budget, and other requirements you NEED in your camera and eliminate the others. (Some good questions to ask yourself are: "What will be the primary purpose/main goal of this camera: professional photography, macro shots, landscape shots, night shots, general point & shoot, etc.?", "What do I need my camera to do in order to accomplish its purpose/goal successfully: take large/uncompressed pictures for editing, have a short macro focal point, have good low light performance, etc.?" and "What features/technical requirements does my camera need to do those things well: RAW mode, attachable lenses, programmable manual controls, have super-macro setting, have AF assist light, long optical zoom, certain memory media or battery type, etc.?")

6) Compare these cameras and subjectively rank your choice(s) based on their other features, user reviews/opinions, your personal preference, what you WANT in your camera, etc. (Some good questions to ask yourself are: "What attributes are important to ME in MY camera: large swivel LCD, good video mode, direct print capabilities, etc.?", "What would I like to be able to do with MY camera: take underwater pictures, hook my camera up to the TV, edit my pictures/video directly on the camera, etc.?" and "Which camera do I have the most fun using: style, color, convenient size/weight, most comfortable and familiar with, etc.?")

7) Go to HOT DEALS (or other sites) and find some hot deals on your top choices!

8) If you have gone through these steps and still want/need advice, feel free to ask your fellow FW members. BUT you should search for threads with similar topics BEFORE you ask! If you still can't find what you're looking for, you can post your question, but make your question as SPECIFIC and DETAILED as possible! (It will be easier for people to help you. And most, if not all, general questions would have already been answered by following these steps.)


v.4.9


(Feel free to post any comments, suggestions, or additions below... but please DO NOT make this into a huge debate on which camera is the best! One camera doesn't fit all! Bumping, link suggestions, and redirecting other threads to this one are allowed. Rate green if you find this thread useful. Help keep this thread alive! )

Member Summary
Most Recent Posts
I figured $0.02 would help.

Consider buying an old(er) used digital camera. I've bought 2 or 3 of them
for specific purpo... (more)

andre1000 (May. 26, 2008 @ 6:24p) |

Good advice for me because Im going to buy one real soon.

jones10021 (Jun. 30, 2008 @ 4:58p) |

Thanks for he info!

TunaCanMan (Oct. 11, 2008 @ 4:47p) |

Digital Photography Review- A very good site for research and reviews.

The Imaging Resource Another very good site for research and reviews. See the LEFT side of the opening page for searching by manufacturer, megapixels, prices, etc., or "Dave's Picks" -the author's preferences.

Imaging Resource "Comparometer"
This is a refined page of the above website; allows you to compare TWO different camera images, side-by-side! For the best comparison, be sure to view the "Still Life" photos at full size. (I suggest looking at "Still Life (ISO) 400" and above, since most cameras start showing their weaknesses at this ISO point). One disadvantage: only current model camera images can be compared.


Steves Digicams - "Best Cameras" - not always up to date, and reviews that do NOT mention the negative side of a camera in a review; slightly "shallow" and commercialized reviews.

Amazon Guide - Compact Digital Cameras
Obviously Amazon wants you to purchase a camera here!

[The "Waterproof" Amazon site stopped working and was deleted]

Wikified:
http://beta.fatwallet.com/wiki/index.php?a=a_view&title=How_to_buy_a_Digital_Camera&type=Product

Your Camera Does Not Matter! - An interesting read on Ken Rockwell's site. He also good reviews as well...

Ken Rockwell's recommended cameras
Thanks for visiting FatWallet.com. Join for free to remove this ad.

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I found this article helpful:
How many megapixels do you need?
http://www.megapixel.net/html/articles/article-megapixels.html

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SOME USEFUL TIPS:
=================


- There is NO one "best" camera! One camera doesn't fit all! It depends on what your needs and requirements are! Don't let anyone tell you otherwise!

- DON'T fall for the "more megapixels, the better" myth! That is just asking for trouble. Many times more megapixels means a larger the image and possibly larger photo-quality prints, but also a more expensive camera with worse quality pictures due to "noise" and increased "purple fringing". (Read the reviews posted above to see what I mean.)

- DON'T fall for the "digital zoom is the same as optical zoom" myth! Optical zoom is "actual zoom" where using optics, the lens adjusts itself to magnify the actual image before writing to memory (like film cameras do). Digital zoom is "fake zoom" where using a combination of software/hardware, the camera just ENLARGES the picture and crops it, thus pixelating the picture and degrading quality. (You can perform "digital zooming" yourself in your photo editing program... it's called "Zoom In" then "Crop".) Unfortunately, many manufacturers prefer to combine both optical and digital zoom into one number, so it's up to you to decipher how much is optical zoom and how much is digital.

- DON'T expect your digital camera to take comparable video as a Mini-DV or other high definition camcorder! Your camera's main purpose was not built for video (otherwise it would be a camcorder that takes pictures, instead of a camera that takes video). If you're looking for something that takes high-definition video, get a camcorder.

- DON'T fall for the "buy high-speed flash memory for faster shooting" myth. Although many professional SLR-type cameras CAN take advantage of the increased read/write speed in high-speed flash memory like "Lexar 80x Professional" series, "Sandisk Ultra II" 60x series, and "Lexar 40x High Speed" series, the VAST MAJORITY of consumer and non-professional SLR type cameras CANNOT! Camera write speeds are limited by their buffer size and speed. And in most consumer cameras, (like many of the ones posted in Hot Deals), the buffer speed is not high enough to take advantage of the memory's increased speed. Therefore, a 4x flash memory card may perform the same as an 80x flash memory card... the only difference being the PRICE you pay for your flash memory, (different cameras may have different results). HOWEVER, the one definite benefit of using high-speed flash memory is that you can download your pictures and videos faster IF you use a high-speed reader (like USB 2.0, Firewire, etc). So unless you have a camera that can take advantage of the increased read/write speeds, or have a high-speed reader and are very impatient about downloading pictures to your computer, you're probably not going to see any benefit from high-speed flash memory.

- BEWARE of "graymarket" cameras! These are cameras imported from other countries and are not intended for resale in the U.S. These cameras do NOT come with a U.S./Canada warranty, thus if something breaks you'll either have to return to the country of purchase for warranty service, or you'll have to eat the cost of the repair/replacement. These cameras typically sell for significantly less than "normal" (without coupons or rebates).

- Since FW isn't specifically a digital camera forum, you may not be able to get all your questions answered here. For more answers/information/tips, you can visit forums specifically for digital cameras. Here are a few:
Digital Camera Resource Page Forums
Digital Photography Review Discussion Forums
Steve's Digicams Steves Forums
Imaging Resource Digital Camera Forums
FredMiranda.com FM Forums (thanks 12345Michael54321)
Rob Galbraith Professional Digital Photography Forums (thanks 12345Michael54321)
Most popular digital camera review websites also have forums, or you can Google for forums as well.

=================

That's all I have for now. If I think of anymore, I'll add them when I have some free time. If you would like to request/suggest a useful tip regarding digital cameras, feel free to PM me or post it below!

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Consider the total price of what you will need for the camera to do what you want- add the price of enough batteries and memory for your purposes.

If you go on vacations without a laptop, or you take hundreds of photos at a time, or raw or tiff photos, having lots of flash memory storage and lots of batteries / battery life can be very important. Cameras that take AA batteries can easily use very cheap rechargeables or in an emergency can use alkalines, so they are easy to keep powered. For cameras that take a custom battery, if you are willing to use generic clones of the battery, several cameras have cheap ones available- check eBay for example. If generic custom batteries are expensive on eBay for the camera you are considering, factor this in to your total cost.

For the memory storage, xD is by far the most expensive (often used by Fuji and Olympus cameras), and the varieties of memorystick (for Sony cameras) are usually very expensive but at least have occasional sales. SD is reasonably priced, and CF is usually very cheap. Some of the high end models of Fuji, Olympus, Sony, as well as DSLRs, can take CF (some of them have dual slots). Factor in the price of the amount of memory that YOU personally need to the cameras you are considering. For midrange cameras that take xD or memorystick, if you consider the total cost it is rare for them to be a good value for a user who needs a lot of memory- but if they are on deep clearance they may be. Also, if you cannot live without a feature that an xD or memorystick camera has, or you already have lots of that type of memory, or if you never take a lot of shots or are far from a computer, they may make sense. But don't get a camera that has expensive supplies unless you have a need that justifies it.

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On the memory cards.. I only buy 128 or 256 capacity cards instead of the higher capacity cards. I've had one go bad and replacing a 128 is much cheaper than a 512 or 1G. I carry several cards with me (which takes almost no room) and have enough room for as many pictures as I want to take.

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dfj said: On the memory cards.. I only buy 128 or 256 capacity cards instead of the higher capacity cards. I've had one go bad and replacing a 128 is much cheaper than a 512 or 1G. I carry several cards with me (which takes almost no room) and have enough room for as many pictures as I want to take.


Good point! You will also lose less pictures from a smaller sized card than a larger card (given that they are both unreadable and unrecoverable by recovery software). However, the flipside to that is that you will have to switch cards more frequently (much more frequently if you shoot a lot of pictures in RAW using a high MP camera). And if your camera does have an unlimited movie function (like the Canon S1 IS), you will not be able to record as long on smaller cards as you can on higher capacity cards.

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chokaay said:
Good point! You will also lose less pictures from a smaller sized card than a larger card (given that they are both unreadable and unrecoverable by recovery software). However, the flipside to that is that you will have to switch cards more frequently (much more frequently if you shoot a lot of pictures in RAW using a high MP camera). And if your camera does have an unlimited movie function (like the Canon S1 IS), you will not be able to record as long on smaller cards as you can on higher capacity cards.


That's right. I had to go to the 256 when I bought an 8MP camera because the files were double the size of the 3MP I'd had. If you are taking RAW pics or unlimited movies you may want the 512 or 1G. But I wouldn't do this for regular pictures. You may then only need 1 512 and 4 or 5 256's. If you have a 3 to 5MP camera you may want some 128's. I sometimes even use the 64 that came with the camera. Thanks Chokaay, this post is great. I really like your links in the OP.

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dfj said: chokaay said:
Good point! You will also lose less pictures from a smaller sized card than a larger card (given that they are both unreadable and unrecoverable by recovery software). However, the flipside to that is that you will have to switch cards more frequently (much more frequently if you shoot a lot of pictures in RAW using a high MP camera). And if your camera does have an unlimited movie function (like the Canon S1 IS), you will not be able to record as long on smaller cards as you can on higher capacity cards.


That's right. I had to go to the 256 when I bought an 8MP camera because the files were double the size of the 3MP I'd had. If you are taking RAW pics or unlimited movies you may want the 512 or 1G. But I wouldn't do this for regular pictures. You may then only need 1 512 and 4 or 5 256's. If you have a 3 to 5MP camera you may want some 128's. I sometimes even use the 64 that came with the camera. Thanks Chokaay, this post is great. I really like your links in the OP.



You're welcome! Hope you learned something new!

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All of the sites from the first post are indexed and searchable at eCoustics.com.

Here is the link to their digital camera section.

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Cool site, thanks for posting!

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very useful thread to read

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Consumer Reports this month, June? Covers digital cameras, printing & online photo storing websites.

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Great topic chokaay, you thought about writing a thread on "How to choose a woman that's right for you!"??

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according to this, can this camera make good quality pictures with the 4x6 size when i take to a place to print them?
Also is this a good camera in your opinion?
Kodak Z740

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mdrollas said: Great topic chokaay, you thought about writing a thread on "How to choose a woman that's right for you!"??


Hahahahhahahahhaa... I'm working on it...

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Buy the cult camera - Panasonic FZ 5,20 or the 30.

Best camera on the market for the price and dp preview says the following.

"...and is without a doubt the best 'super zoom' camera on the market for anyone serious about photography, "

2.8 fixed
Leica 12x zoom
digital stabilizer
5MP
many many add ons plus a forum devoted to the Panasonic FZ camera

Panasonic fz forum

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Hi all,

Sorry for the blast. I want to get a new digital cammer for my wife. And I have a few specs that i wanted within this cammer, but am not sure where to start to look, i have checked out the dpreview, and few of friend's dig cammer, I would like you guys input also before i decide what brand and model to buy. Anyway, the specs are:

1. 5MP or 7.1MP or better
2. We like auto, the less need to play with setting, the better. Of cause We want the result of the Pic to be good too
3. Small, palm size, can be easily put in pocket, But we also hope the LCD isnt easy cracked like the canon SD500, cute would be better since it is for HER
4. In case of some "motion" pics, hopeful the results of it wont be so flury.


Rgrds.
Iceox

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chokaay said:
- DON'T fall for the "buy high-speed flash memory for faster shooting" myth. Although many professional SLR-type cameras CAN take advantage of the increased read/write speed in high-speed flash memory like "Lexar 80x Professional" series, "Sandisk Ultra II" 60x series, and "Lexar 40x High Speed" series, the VAST MAJORITY of consumer and non-professional SLR type cameras CANNOT! Camera write speeds are limited by their buffer size and speed. And in most consumer cameras, (like many of the ones posted in Hot Deals), the buffer speed is not high enough to take advantage of the memory's increased speed. Therefore, a 4x flash memory card may perform the same as an 80x flash memory card... the only difference being the PRICE you pay for your flash memory, (different cameras may have different results). HOWEVER, the one definite benefit of using high-speed flash memory is that you can download your pictures and videos faster IF you use a high-speed reader (like USB 2.0, Firewire, etc). So unless you have a camera that can take advantage of the increased read/write speeds, or have a high-speed reader and are very impatient about downloading pictures to your computer, you're probably not going to see any benefit from high-speed flash memory.


I generally agree, but I feel the benefit of the time saved is worth getting the higher speed cards. I have quite a few SD cards of varying speeds. One of which is an older, slower card. Most of my newer cards are 'high speed' cards. While I usually do not notice a difference while taking pictures, the difference is HUGE when using a card reader with my desktop or laptop. Both my desktop and laptop have built in memory card readers. I usually just pop in the cards to view a slideshow and rotate some pictures 90 degrees. With the slow card, a 4 megapixel photo takes nearly 2 minutes to rotate; with the newer, faster card it takes about 4 seconds. Quite a difference!!

Also, as you noted, the other advantage of the faster cards is that the pictures will transfer to your hard drive much faster. The faster the read/write capability of the card, the faster the transfer to your computer. In some instances (depending on how much data is on the card), that could mean a 2 minute transfer with a high speed card versus a 25 minute transfer with a slower speed card.

With the relatively small premiums high speed cards command (typically about 10%), I find the extra speed well worth the investment. JMHO.

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For the memory storage, xD is by far the most expensive (often used by Fuji and Olympus cameras), and the varieties of memorystick (for Sony cameras) are usually very expensive but at least have occasional sales.
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there is some proprietary associated with xD card. If you buy Olympus camera be aware of Panorama effect. you can not use Fuji xD cards and many generic xD cards which does not say anything about Olympus (Panorama effect) compatibility. Moreover some of the old Olympus cameras can not use xD cards bigger than 512 MB. Do your survey before buying.

Pros/cons between CF and SD
CF card cameras are bigger than SD.
CF cards cost little less than same capacity SD. Of course depends on capacity.
SD cards may have little advantage if you have other devices like PDA, mp3 player etc. you can swap them.

As some one already mentioned, use your digital camera only and only for photography. do not think it can work as a handy alternate for camcorder. digital camera is meant for photography and camcorder for video shooting. If you do not care, you can use it for which it is not meant.

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very useful thread, chokaay. In everyone's opinion, which is the best way to choose a DC for nighttime shooting? I bought a Kodak 3.1MP (need to look up the model) & it only fares well when there is so much background lighting. I've never taken it out to the baseball field at night, but that would prob be a good start. In clubs (yes I go to clubs...), the pictures are just so-so & that's with quite a bit of lighting. Does going up to 7MP or more help, or does it depend on the camera. Also, do u think a zoom lens would be of any benefit in this case?? Thanks!

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SeriusBlack said: very useful thread, chokaay. In everyone's opinion, which is the best way to choose a DC for nighttime shooting? I bought a Kodak 3.1MP (need to look up the model) & it only fares well when there is so much background lighting. I've never taken it out to the baseball field at night, but that would prob be a good start. In clubs (yes I go to clubs...), the pictures are just so-so & that's with quite a bit of lighting. Does going up to 7MP or more help, or does it depend on the camera. Also, do u think a zoom lens would be of any benefit in this case?? Thanks!

No, those factors will not influence nightshots. You should find a camera that has a strong AF light, longer flash range, and/or Night Mode setting. If your camera has manual controls, you can also tweak your camera to take better low-light shots by increasing the ISO (at the expense of quality) and/or prolonging the shutter time (at the expense of blurring the picture... tripod is recommended). You can also read reviews on the cameras you're interested in, and see what the reviewer has to say about night shots with that particular camera.

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Hey everyone!

Just signed up to the forum, and i need some advice badly. I am going to africa soon for a few months and I need a digital camera. Some info: I cant afford to spend more then 300, 350, with my old camera i took too many blurry shots, I am not that skilled a camera user, i probably need something that doesnt eat batteries, etc. I have found a deal for a canon powershot SD400 for 250.00 . Should i take this? Please, any help would be much appreciated

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Do not buy a Kodak DX4900. The plastic battery doors quit latching and per Kodak its not a defect. Though these are all over eBay for $25.00 now. I originally purchased for $400.00 three years ago.

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Steves Digicams - Best Cameras - not always up to date, and generous reviews - but a good way to get some quick idea of the options

Amazon Guide - Compact Digital Cameras

Amazon Guide - Waterproof Cameras

dpreview has the best reviews, IMO

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My .02 on the new Panny FZ7 !!! Love it ! I was an Olympus fan, until I was ready for a super zoom one, but they failed with putting a model with IS. The reviews pointed me to the FZ7, and a little shopping around (just over $300 - thanks to FW !) make me do the jump.

What a difference !!! Even night shots or low ligth are amazing !

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I am so relieved to see this topic here - I've spent the past couple days trying to do research on buying a digital camera - finally time to admit I just want one - and this looks like it is a really good resource. This digital camera shopping thing is a lot harder than i thought! So, thanks

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Great post! Thanks!

great links in the thread.

I love the buying guide [ buying guide ] at Digital Photography Review.

The people at this site are professionals, and their reviews are much more in depth that at other sites. Check out your camera at this site before purchasing. They have forums devoted to different brands, as well as SLRs versus point-and-shoots.

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Very comprehensive and extremely useful. Thanks to all who have posted info here. I'm in the market for my first digital SLR ... and am finally going to retire my hand-me down minolta x700. Off to follow all the suggestions here...

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i want to maximum resolution of digital camera,about 10 mega pixles,so its possible?

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8 mega pixels is quite high... you can get that with the Canon Rebel XT, the Canon 20 and 30 series, as well as from other makers. But I know Canon the best.

Going higher is rare and much more expensive.

The Canon 5D is 13 Mega Pixels. Retail is about $3,200. Find it on line (from Fat Wallet deals) for as low as $2,450 or so. Like from Dell or One Call.

The biggest bad boy for us mere mortals is the Canon 1DS-MKII --- 16 mega pixels. About $6k or $7k. Not sure, since out of my price range.

(There is a 39 mega pixel back for medium format cameras. I guess it is $60k to $100k. Again, that is my guess.)

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I'm a newbie to this site, but I had a few thoughts on this subject that I wanted to throw out there.
First, it is very true that more megapixels do not guarantee a better picture. Sensor size, lens size, image stabilization and lens quality make a difference too. Even newer processing chips can help in some situations, especially bad lighting.

In the above posts, and on many forums people still talk a lot about the drawbacks of proprietary flash memory cards for cameras. But all memory card prices have come down. For someone on the low end of the camera market, this still can make a difference, but in the midrange it is in my opinion not so important anymore, unless you decide to shoot RAW images* Even with a 6MP camera or so, in highest JPG mode a 1GB card can store about 300 pictures. And, the price range (worst case) for a 1GB ranges from around $20 for CF and SD, to around $40 for Memorystick and xD. You can get better deals on all, but my point is that if you just need 1 or 2 cards, it is only a $20-40 surplus for Memorystick or xD- so if you find a Sony camera you like I think it can be a fine choice.

* Shooting RAW is usually slower and takes up a lot more space in memory cards, but it gives you a little higher quality and most importantly lets you make many decisions about exposure, etc. after when you can sit at the computer instead of on the fly.

Be a little wary of Steve's Digicams as Buzzy implied. I love his 3D view of cameras, but he almost never really condemns a camera, and basically finds something good to say about every camera. Another thing is unfortunately, a lot of the reviews on Amazon or Epinions of cameras are pretty useless. Many of the bad reviews are from people who are just not techie enough to understand any digital camera, and many of the good reviews are from people who just aren't very picky. If you have broadband, I would look at a lot of images taken with the camera you are considering. I like the DPreview forums for reviews and comments usually from a little more experienced users.

And one final warning. The demand on eBay for digital cameras is really high and they tend to sell for a lot more than they are worth. Older models often have subtle drawbacks, and reviews for cameras are often a "snapshot of a period in time." A camera that has great reviews a few years ago may not be as good as a camera with great reviews today. You might get a lot more solid construction (more metal, etc.) on an older camera, but you tend to lose out on speed, battery life and in-camera noise processing. Cameras sold as new often aren't, or aren't US models with warranty. Also a lot of the dealers that show up on the low end of price comparisons sites are hard to deal with- they call you and say the warranty will be extra, the battery and charger that come with the camera will cost extra, etc. If you refuse to buy extra stuff some will say the item is out of stock, and they sometimes send non-US models.
If your credit card company is good at taking your side on disputes, and you don't mind fighting/haggling it may work out, but it is probably easiest to try to research your seller by asking a place like this, checking resellerratings.com and the BBB, and checking the internet for complaints.

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Can someone give me a quick recommendation for a reasonably-pricd digital camera that you know for sure does NOT have a delay between when you push the button and the picture actually gets taken? I now own my second digital camera and I've had the same problem with both. I hear it's quite common, but I have to wait a full five seconds and sometimes I lose the picture. Surely some camera maker has fixed this problem. Thank you!

Toni
Scrimpin' and Savin' for a Wedding and a House!

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Scrimpin said: Can someone give me a quick recommendation for a reasonably-pricd digital camera that you know for sure does NOT have a delay between when you push the button and the picture actually gets taken? I now own my second digital camera and I've had the same problem with both. I hear it's quite common, but I have to wait a full five seconds and sometimes I lose the picture. Surely some camera maker has fixed this problem. Thank you!


A lot of the delay in most cases comes from the focus. Sony and Canon are better than most, but your best bet may be to get a camera with a manual focus. Once you set the manual focus, most cameras will take pictures quickly. A site that gives good tests of the speed of various camera functions is http://www.imaging-resource.com/ .
Here is an example of the info:
http://www.imaging-resource.com/PRODS/A510/A51DATA.HTM
Another possibility is to half-press the button to focus before you want to take the picture, and then press it when you are ready.

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more 2 cents

the fuji f30 with the $50 rebate is a steal ($200) for a low light capable camera - see any review and look at pophoto.com this month for a nice article. It really does take 500 shots on a charge and really can take picture in dim light without all the noise that other cameras have at iso 200. Who cares about the xd cards - buy a couple when you find a good price.

In super zooms the Lumix really does kick butt. It does have noise but not as bad as some of the reviews complain about.

In a super zoom with wide 28-300 you get the Fuji s6000 without IS - it can notch up the ISO and do fine - if you are shooting a moving target IS won't help, higher ISO and shutter speed will.

In a dslr - the pentax k10d looks like it would kill Nikon and Canon ( and sony ) with its great price, IS, dust removal, 10 meg sensor, weathertight body .... Do not think that because you have lenses from your film camera that you will ever use them on your new dslr. They fit, but they are not optimum.

Also- use a polarizer and and 2 stop ND filter when needed, Digital cameras do not have the dynamic range of cheap film and you either blow out the highlights, lose the shadows, or both. Fuji does have a better sensor for this problem.

And if you really want good photos cheap - buy an Olympus Stylus Epic for $80 and throw some film in it. The kodak Portras are nice and the Fuji slide film is amazing...... To develope a 36 exposure roll with double prints might cost $10 for 5x7's, on an inkjet that would be three times the price

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The thing that Amazon is good for is if you can find someone who knows what they are talking about. Especially when the camera is first released and there are no reviews out yet.

It's also sometimes good for little tidbits of info (global voltage charger? adapter size for lens attachments?)

The user reviews and [manufacturer name] Talk forums at dpreviews.com can be useful in the same way, but you have to read a lot to find the good stuff.

CNET has comments that are just wrong too often to take them seriously. You really have to doublecheck what they say.

As Drumple notes, buying an older model is rarely a real bargain, except maybe for the best of the last generation when you get a good deal ... cameras are still getting better rapidly in terms of processing, power consumption, features, interface, etc.

Lots of new models will come out in the next couple months. Anyone thinking of spending serious money should keep an eye on dpreview for announcements of what's coming out.

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fateye said: more 2 cents


In a dslr - the pentax k10d looks like it would kill Nikon and Canon ( and sony ) with its great price, IS, dust removal, 10 meg sensor, weathertight body ....


the jpeg images are reportedly soft on the k10d, both in general and specifically compared to the nikon d80, canon 30d, and sony a100. (source: dpreview.com) if you get one, plan to shoot RAW. all of the aforementioned cameras received "highly recommended" ratings, although there is a note on the k10d review that the camera just barely made the rating.

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Has anyone bought or used a Nikon s7c? I have short time to return an unopened gift (a decent Canon 7mp complete pkg), and have been drawn to the s7c since I saw it 6 months ago. Up to date technology, but especially like the wifi. I usually wouldn't go for flatbody, (old school on lenses I guess). But the write up on this looks mighty fine.
Thank You.
Thanks for the thread Chokaay.

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got2grow said: Has anyone bought or used a Nikon s7c? I have short time to return an unopened gift (a decent Canon 7mp complete pkg), and have been drawn to the s7c since I saw it 6 months ago. Up to date technology, but especially like the wifi. I usually wouldn't go for flatbody, (old school on lenses I guess). But the write up on this looks mighty fine.
Thank You.
Thanks for the thread Chokaay.


One big flaw with the Nikon S7c is that the VR / IS (image stabilization) it has is basically fake - it isn't optical image stabilization, instead it is a much inferior digital stabilization. If you read the reviews, the image quality even not considering that issue doesn't match most Canons. But I really do like the appearance of it. Maybe the next round of cameras that Nikon announces will be more interesting- they once made some of the best digital cameras (the Nikon 5700, 990, and 4500 were excellent in their time), and they make great SLRs.

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Its very useful thread for novice users.
best digital camcorder

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Thanks for he info!

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