Best "natural daylight" desk lamp for studying?

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Looking for a "natural daylight" that reduces eye strain while reading / studying and reasonably priced. Are they all created equal? Any suggestions? Thanks!

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The Sharper Image ones are actually pretty good, as they are dimmable as well should they be too bright.

New stock price is high, but they sell customer returns for pretty cheap through their outlet store at their web site and their eBay store. The model with the pivoted arm is more desirable than the flexible arm, and they have a "library" style that would work well too if it will fit in your location.

Here are some links... keep in mind that they might be cheaper at their eBay store.

Library lamp

desk lamp (not refurb - just for reference)

No luck on the desk lamp in their refurbs now, so wait. As a less than perfect outlet item, it goes for about $40. Add shipping, which won't be bad on a low priced item (they base shipping costs on product cost). On the latter lamp, I've had one for a long time, and others who have been at my desk have bought one for themselves. The replacement lamp is cheap to buy, and I don't know of anyone who has needed one.

Just buy a regular lamp then head to Home Depot and get a "Day-Light" bulb. The buld in Home-Depot should cost about $10.

Yes, there are some difference in wave-length, etc but until someone who can show me a study that some bulb produce less eye-strain than others, I would just save the $.

Don't remember the brand but I bought a desk lamp with a natural daylight bulb from Costco for about $30. If you don't like it then you can return it without hassle.

I picked up a Verilux desk lamp at Tuesday morning for $35 a couple weeks ago.

Sams Club has a nice metal pivoting arm natural daylight desk lamp by Lights of America for under $25. This looks much better than the plastic one they sold last year for $20.

I'm a spectroscopist. That's a person who studies the colors of light
emitted by various gasses and hot things.

The best light for reading is not what I study. But I can tell you
two things that I'm sure are helpful.

1. A halogen light is more efficient than a regular incandescent bulb
and it will give you a non flickering light. If you can put the light
within 1 foot of your reading material and it's a 20watt light it will
shine with the same intensity as a 160 watt halogen bulb 8 feet away.

2. The 4' shop lights are the most efficient lights we have that are
close to full spectrum besides halogen. A $10 80Watt 2 bulb lamp on
your ceiling is probably a very good choice for many reasons.

A. It's cheap B. It's bright C. It's not going to flicker if you get
the ones with electronic ballasts. I believe that is the majority of the
ones at home depot etc. D. The color is 'good' depending on which
lamps you buy. Read the CRI and get the highest number if you
go with this choice. .


If you read about 'full spectrum' lights and think that they are good
for reading with then you should be thinking about halogen instead.
If anything is full spectrum it's NOT a fluorescent bulb if you're comparing
it to a halogen light.

Just compare the emission spectra of halogen with fluroescent.
This link tells the story.
http://chemeducator.org/sbibs/samples/spapers/34samplejg.htm

One bit of advice I read that makes sense is this:
"Light Color - Try several different types of bulb. Choose the color that provides the desired effect"

Just like a green light will cause green things to look bright and red
things to look darker, certain lights will cause your reading material to
look better than others.

My advice is to avoid the marketing hype. You're assuming that 'natural daylight' reduces eyestrain. I don't know that for a fact. Can you cite a
scientific study by a doctor or a health facility? If not then you're buying the hype.

LAST WORD:

Go to one of the eye sites. Like the American eye association or something like that and see what they say.

I did that and found this light
http://www.eyesaverbulb.com/feedback.html

It's an incandescent OR halogen (not sure which although I don't think
it's halogen because they cost more and GE spent their money on advertising instead of the product). The reflective top tends to create a larger
'virtual filament' and so you will get less shadow. You could do the
same with a halogen and a frosted cover over it.

Enjoy the search.

TERMS:

CRI - color rendering index = 100 = sunlight
Halogen = 100
Fluroescent usually about 84

Blackbody Emission - The light emitted by a perfectly black
very hot thing. Nearly identical to sunlight

Compact flourescent ~4300K

I bought a Tensor desk lamp for $25 from QVC a couple of years ago. It's a "natural daylight" lamp and has a nice clean white light. Here's the selection that they have now:

http://www.QVC.com/asp/frameset.asp?nest=%2Fasp%2FisItemNumberRedirect.asp&search=SQ&frames=y&referrer=QVC&CLASSLEVEL=&cm_re=PAGE-_-SEARCH-_-SEARCH&txtDesc=tensor+lamp&SearchClass=

Note that the desk lamps start at around $17 and the floor lamps at around $58. Hope this helps!

I noticed that Costco now sells one. I have seen it in the many carts that surround me at check-out. I'm sorry that I don't know the price of it, but I'll be sure to look the next time that I go. But as always, I feel that Costco provides the best product for the best bang for the buck.

Thanks to FWer andre1000 post for a great synopsis of what's meaningful amidst the hype of 'natural daylight' products.

also andre1000 said:
[Q]I did that and found this light http://www.eyesaverbulb.com Thanks for the link, this Westinghouse product looks like a great replacement incandescent bulb for a floor or table lamp if you don't want to go the halogen route. Looked for the nearest retailer carrying this product in my area, it was a Kaiser Permanente 30 miles away...too funny.

BTW there are high CRI-value flourescent lights out there, a while back in a Facility Manager role for a high-tech office buildout I spec'd a 4-tube electronic ballast fixture with Philips TL-950s (98CRI/5000K) fluorescent lights. The cost benefit was an easy sell to management and the number of positive comments after completion was extraordinary; from board members/conference rooms to sw developers working late nights. As we all know, greater productivity when you keep the melatonin level low.

I got a Tensor Desk Lamp from Fry's for around 10 bucks a year ago (was on sale). It uses a 13 watt bulb,and gave nice clear white light, and I actually ended buying two (cheaper than buying a replacement bulb!). I really dislike the yellow light that incandescent bulbs (even the GE "Reveal" lights) give out. However even some of the fluorescent bulbs give off yellowish (ugh!) lights --I think if they describe it as "warm", then it will give off yellowish light. The eyesaver bulb is rated at 125 watts -- isn't that kinda 'hot' if you will be reading right next to it?



dmb851290 said: [Q]I bought a Tensor desk lamp for $25 from QVC a couple of years ago. It's a "natural daylight" lamp and has a nice clean white light. Here's the selection that they have now:

http://www.QVC.com/asp/frameset.asp?nest=%2Fasp%2FisItemNumberRedirect.asp&search=SQ&frames=y&referrer=QVC&CLASSLEVEL=&cm_re=PAGE-_-SEARCH-_-SEARCH&txtDesc=tensor+lamp&SearchClass=

Note that the desk lamps start at around $17 and the floor lamps at around $58. Hope this helps!

andre1000 said: [Q] If you can put the light within 1 foot of your reading material and it's a 20watt light it will shine with the same intensity as a 160 watt halogen bulb 8 feet away.

Could you please explain more about the 20 watt light within 1 foot and the 160 watt light 8 feet away--I'm confused... Thanks!


[Q]2. The 4' shop lights are the most efficient lights we have that are
close to full spectrum besides halogen. A $10 80Watt 2 bulb lamp on
your ceiling is probably a very good choice for many reasons. .

Are you talking about 4' fluorescent bulbs here?


andre1000--Thanks so much for all of your info!! And please be patient with my additional questions as I am a bit of a dimwit in this area (he he). I actually am very interested in this light/"natural daylight" thing because I am particular about the color and quality of light in my home, but I don't know enough about it to get it right half the time, so I drive myself a little crazy with it. It seems like I find a light bulb I like, then can't find it in the stores anymore. It seems like you can pay a lot for something that isn't very good. I don't like yellow light, or the color of traditional incandescent bulbs. I've used Verilux, which I tend to like. They are supposed to last 5000 hours. I'd like to know what you think of these Evolution Light Bulbs These are all found in the Gaiam.com website and the prices are comparable to what I find in my local health food store, which is the cheapest place I can buy these bulbs in town.

Gaiam.com also provided this great Comparison Chart for Light Bulbs which compared all of the important criteria andre1000 listed. I thought the CRI info was interesting!



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