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http://www.centerfireguns.com/smith-and-wesson-mp15r-5.45mmx39mm...
If you're looking for an AR-15 to do some plinking, this will allow you to shoot cheaper ammo.

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Bluegrass00 said:   http://www.centerfireguns.com/smith-and-wesson-mp15r-5.45mmx39mm...
If you're looking for an AR-15 to do some plinking, this allow you to shoot cheaper ammo.


I don't get it, the rounds don't seem to be that much cheaper than .223 or 7.62x39. Besides, isn't it a bad idea to run Wolf quality ammo in an AR15 style action? I thought it "tore" it up up.

AK74 action, that's fine for ultra cheap ammo, but not as accurate.

ricoscoro said:   Bluegrass00 said:   http://www.centerfireguns.com/smith-and-wesson-mp15r-5.45mmx39mm...
If you're looking for an AR-15 to do some plinking, this allow you to shoot cheaper ammo.


I don't get it, the rounds don't seem to be that much cheaper than .223 or 7.62x39. Besides, isn't it a bad idea to run Wolf quality ammo in an AR15 style action? I thought it "tore" it up up.

AK74 action, that's fine for ultra cheap ammo, but not as accurate.


Shooting steel cased .223/5.56 rounds is about $.18 each whereas steel cased 5.45x39 runs about $.12 each. There is quite a difference in price, especially when shooting hundreds of rounds.

Wolf is fine to run in most AR's. Some receivers don't like it and others will shoot it all day long with no issues. My receiver is one that shoots all day long with no issues.

Great price on this gun.

I'm guessing no chromed barrel?

bs6749 said:   Shooting steel cased .223/5.56 rounds is about $.18 each whereas steel cased 5.45x39 runs about $.12 each. There is quite a difference in price, especially when shooting hundreds of rounds.


Made more sense when ammo was going through the roof. $.06 x 500 = $30. Not worth the extra cleaning required for most people. Can't be reloaded. Not as accurate. Not as many choices for loads. The same gun in .223 is $50 more. That's the better way to go for most.

bs6749 said:   ricoscoro said:   Bluegrass00 said:   http://www.centerfireguns.com/smith-and-wesson-mp15r-5.45mmx39mm...
If you're looking for an AR-15 to do some plinking, this allow you to shoot cheaper ammo.


I don't get it, the rounds don't seem to be that much cheaper than .223 or 7.62x39. Besides, isn't it a bad idea to run Wolf quality ammo in an AR15 style action? I thought it "tore" it up up.

AK74 action, that's fine for ultra cheap ammo, but not as accurate.


Shooting steel cased .223/5.56 rounds is about $.18 each whereas steel cased 5.45x39 runs about $.12 each. There is quite a difference in price, especially when shooting hundreds of rounds.

Wolf is fine to run in most AR's. Some receivers don't like it and others will shoot it all day long with no issues. My receiver is one that shoots all day long with no issues.

Great price on this gun.


With the AR action, I've heard about some of the lacquer coated ammo (Wolf) heating up after a while of shooting and actually getting stuck in the action.

Where do you get 5.45 for $0.12/round?

This is a good deal on a rifle that shoots cheap ammo. We have been selling the AK-74's and the 5.45 M&P's because of the cheap ammo. S&W is having a sale on the 5.45's and M&P 15OR's right now. The downside is the cheap ammo is not as available as it used to be. It was cheap due to the large imports of surplus 5.45 a couple of years ago and lack of sales due to limited demand. The future of the low price is in question. When the surplus dries up the price of 5.45 ammo should be about that of 7.62 and 5.56 from places like wolf and bear.

livinn59801 said:   I'm guessing no chromed barrel?
Chrome Barrel Bore, Gas Key, Bolt Carrier, and Chamber

I'm still able to pick up 1040 for less than 150 bucks. That's about half price of 5.56mm. This rifle will pay for itself. Mags can be tough to find unless you mail order them (until Magpul makes one... ha!) and I had to "trim" the buffer spring on a rifle to get it to function but it has been pretty awesome since then.

Any ideas on what sort of accuracy can you expect from 5.45 budget ammo fired from a rifle like this S&W?

Netropy said:   bs6749 said:   Shooting steel cased .223/5.56 rounds is about $.18 each whereas steel cased 5.45x39 runs about $.12 each. There is quite a difference in price, especially when shooting hundreds of rounds.


Made more sense when ammo was going through the roof. $.06 x 500 = $30. Not worth the extra cleaning required for most people. Can't be reloaded. Not as accurate. Not as many choices for loads. The same gun in .223 is $50 more. That's the better way to go for most.


Actually, it makes more sense to purchase the less expensive ammo when prices are cheaper given that the price difference of $.06/round remains constant. Here's an example. 1000 rounds of steel cased .223/5.56 would be $180 @ $.18/round, while 1000 steel cased 5.45x39 rounds would be $120. The cost of 5.45x39 vs. .223/5.56 is $120/$180 or 2/3. Now let's go to an extreme and say that 5.45x39 is valued at $.01/round and the same price difference of $.06 remains so that .223/5.56 costs $.07/round. The cost of 5.45x39 is now 1/7th that of .223/5.56 rounds. Thus it can be seen that as the price heads towards infinity with the $.06 remaining constant, the limit will approach 1 meaning that the rounds are essentially the same price.

Sure, this may not impact many shooters, however there are people that shoot thousands of rounds in a month or more. As you can imagine, a $0.06/round difference can turn into hundreds of dollars in a small amount of time.

Also, the accuracy depends mostly on the shooter and not the rounds.

ricoscoro said:   bs6749 said:   ricoscoro said:   Bluegrass00 said:   http://www.centerfireguns.com/smith-and-wesson-mp15r-5.45mmx39mm...
If you're looking for an AR-15 to do some plinking, this allow you to shoot cheaper ammo.


I don't get it, the rounds don't seem to be that much cheaper than .223 or 7.62x39. Besides, isn't it a bad idea to run Wolf quality ammo in an AR15 style action? I thought it "tore" it up up.

AK74 action, that's fine for ultra cheap ammo, but not as accurate.


Shooting steel cased .223/5.56 rounds is about $.18 each whereas steel cased 5.45x39 runs about $.12 each. There is quite a difference in price, especially when shooting hundreds of rounds.

Wolf is fine to run in most AR's. Some receivers don't like it and others will shoot it all day long with no issues. My receiver is one that shoots all day long with no issues.

Great price on this gun.


With the AR action, I've heard about some of the lacquer coated ammo (Wolf) heating up after a while of shooting and actually getting stuck in the action.

Where do you get 5.45 for $0.12/round?


http://www.aimsurplus.com/product.aspx?item=A54539R&name=Russian...

$0.1203/round before shipping or $.134/round shipped for 2 cases.

EDIT. Forgot to mention that Wolf has been unlaquered now for years.

About 2.5-3 MOA, give or take.

bs6749 said:   
Actually, it makes more sense to purchase the less expensive ammo when prices are cheaper given that the price difference of $.06/round remains constant. Here's an example. 1000 rounds of steel cased .223/5.56 would be $180 @ $.18/round, while 1000 steel cased 5.45x39 rounds would be $120. The cost of 5.45x39 vs. .223/5.56 is $120/$180 or 2/3. Now let's go to an extreme and say that 5.45x39 is valued at $.01/round and the same price difference of $.06 remains so that .223/5.56 costs $.07/round. The cost of 5.45x39 is now 1/7th that of .223/5.56 rounds. Thus it can be seen that as the price heads towards infinity with the $.06 remaining constant, the limit will approach 1 meaning that the rounds are essentially the same price.


Of course it's cheaper when it's cheaper. lol I meant that it made more sense when there was a greater difference in the price between the 5.45 and the 5.56/.223 when the latter was hard to find and pricing was ridiculous a while back.



Also, the accuracy depends mostly on the shooter and not the rounds.


True, but with the 5.45 you're limited to mil surp ammo. With the 5.56/.223 you have a much larger selection including better quality commericial ammo, match grade, and your own hand-loads which, assuming you can shoot, will be more consistent and more accurate. Also a wider selection of bullet weights and types for hunting, etc.

If ammo were 1/4 the price and I could pick up an upper and some mags for real cheap, then I might be able to see it. For just a ~.06/round difference given the added limitations for a basically equivalent caliber to the 5.56/.223, not really worth it to me. Might be for others.

If you want an AR rifle that shoots cheap ammo, buy the $699 SW M&P AR15OR in 5.56 and get a .22 cal Conversion kit for around $120. Then you can shoot .22 round & 5.56 round in the same AR15.

Does anyone know if this is a standard multi-cal AR lower? I had been thinking about a 5.45 upper as a training upper (my .22LR upper just doesn't have the recoil for good transition training), but this would be great way to get a spare high-Tier 2 lower as well.

Yes, this should be a "multi-cal".

joonbug2 said:   If you want an AR rifle that shoots cheap ammo, buy the $699 SW M&P AR15OR in 5.56 and get a .22 cal Conversion kit for around $120. Then you can shoot .22 round & 5.56 round in the same AR15.

Links?

bs6749 said:   Yes, this should be a "multi-cal".
Sweet, thanks!

Coming up at $849 now...



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