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Titan Energy Efficient 7 LED Light Bulbs
Thanks BMWLVR82
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Most Recent Posts
What brand LED bulbs do you have?

PuvMan (Jul. 25, 2011 @ 3:10p) |

can these titan 0.5 w bulbs be used as appliance bulbs?

evergreenninja (Aug. 02, 2011 @ 5:09p) |

I bought 2 LED bulbs from Meritline last year. They have been in fixtures that stay on 24/7, and so far they are good. H... (more)

blueiedgod (Aug. 16, 2011 @ 9:38a) |

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are these dimmable?

It's a nice price, but note that these are only equivalent to a 15W incandescent.

15W is a very dim light. Most incandescent bulbs are 100W or 60W. Where would you use a 15W bulb?

I'd buy them if they'd fit my night light bases ( candelabra base? ).
However the "Fits standard light sockets" info makes me think these are too big.
Anyway... Green for BB ( so he'll keep looking ).

Most Americans are unaware that incandescent light bulbs will be extinct quite soon in the U.S. As a matter of fact, under the current law, we won't be able to buy 100 Watt incandescent lght bulbs after the end of this year (2011) which is a few months from now, while 40W & 60W will be here only for 2 more years!

A 4-pack compact fluorescent light bulbs cost around $10 or less these days while incandescent bulbs are even cheaper. They're all said to be able to last a few thousand hours, but not anywhere near 35,000 hours. Similar to the compact fluorescent light bulbs (CFL), LED devices are much more efficient in energy usage than the incandescent light bulbs.

Note that the "SPEC" says that these LEDs come with 1-year warranty, not 35,000 hours (or about 4 years). Intrinsically, it is possible for an LED device to last 35,000 hours if operated in low light output ranges. Typically, the light output for LED is rather small - only in fractions of a Watt. My somewhat "outdated" knowledge says that, with some designs, LEDs could emit a few hundred milliwatts (or, a few tenth of a Watt). Beyond that, even if operable, its reliability would be seriously jeopardized - namely it will quickly be "burned out". Therefore, you would need an array of tens or hundreds of LEDs to achieve watt-level of light outputs. Along with multiplicity of devices in concurrent high output operation, the reliability of the integrated device goes down significantly.

Notice also that LEDs are run on direct currents (DC). Therefore, the household outlets' 110 alernating current (AC) power source has to be converted to DC and need to be reduced to operate the LED devices. As such, circuits which perform these conversions come with their own reliability implications. Therefore, the final LED product will probably last a lot less than 35,000 hours as opposed to what is claimed in the advertisements.

Product Info

Get great energy savings without the drawbacks of a compact fluorescent. Titan's LED bulbs switch on instantly without a warming up period, and have no toxic mercury. A cool to the touch 7 LED array is equivalent to a 15 watt incandescent and lasts for up to 35,000 hours.

The LED bulbs fit in standard light sockets and last for years with normal use. Great for hard to reach places, you won't experience the aggravation of constantly replacing bulbs. So switch out those energy guzzling incandescent bulbs and get a four pack of efficient Titan LEDs.

Specs

Condition: NEW
Bulk Packaging
1-Year Warranty
Manufacturer: Titan

Features Include:

Fits standard light sockets
15W incandescent equivalent
0.5W, 110v
7 LED array
Energy efficient
Money saving
35,000 hour long life
Instant on
Cool to the touch
Zero mercury
46mm diameter, 3" length
4-pack

I have a vanity in my bathroom that takes 6 globular 15W bulbs. Green!

really


Maisma said:    globular !

In 4 two sets...read article in Houston Chronicle this morning rating CFL and LED lights...all were in the 11-15 watt range with LED's costing $40 each...I'm willing to try these out at that price...thanx OP

Do these come with a 30 gram or 25 gram chocorat bar?

Cogtx said:   In 4 two sets...read article in Houston Chronicle this morning rating CFL and LED lights...all were in the 11-15 watt range with LED's costing $40 each...I'm willing to try these out at that price...thanx OP

Are those 15 real watts, or 15 "equivalent" watts? These bulbs are actually only 0.5 watts each.

Here is a conversion for
incandescent watts to led watts
110 voltage. NOT 220 voltage

incandescent Led

12-15W 1.3W
25W 3W
40W 5W
60W 7W
75W 9W
100W 13W

It looks a lot better spaced lol

Btw I bought 10 from china for $110 shipped

Product Name: E27 Screw 7W 110V 108 LED Corn White Light Bulb, 5pcs/lot
Item Code: 106333371
Category: LED Bulbs
Short Description: Model Number:H4474 Brand NameEM Input Voltage:110v Color:Wh...


Btw I bought 10 corn cob bulbs from china

Product Name: E27 Screw 7W 110V 108 LED Corn White Light Bulb, 5pcs/lot
Item Code: 106333371
Category: LED Bulbs
Short Description: Model Number:H4474 Brand NameEM Input Voltage:110v Color:Wh...

tonglu1 said:   Most Americans are unaware that incandescent light bulbs will be extinct quite soon in the U.S. As a matter of fact, under the current law, we won't be able to buy 100 Watt incandescent lght bulbs after the end of this year (2011) which is a few months from now, while 40W & 60W will be here only for 2 more years!


I'd like to know your source of this info. I don't think it's right.

From the New York Times...

May 26, 2011 NYT

[T]he Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 ... requires light bulb makers to improve the efficiency of incandescent bulbs by 25 percent. The details of the law dictated a phase-out of the manufacture of certain bulbs in their current incarnation, starting with 100-watt bulbs next January.

The law does not ban the use or manufacture of all incandescent bulbs, nor does it mandate the use of compact fluorescent ones. It simply requires that companies make some of their incandescent bulbs work a bit better, meeting a series of rolling deadlines between 2012 and 2014.

Furthermore, all sorts of exemptions are written into the law, which means that all sorts of bulbs are getting a free pass and can keep their energy-guzzling ways indefinitely, including "specialty bulbs" like the [antique style, clear glass] Edison bulbs …, as well as three-way bulbs, silver-bottomed bulbs, chandelier bulbs, refrigerator bulbs, plant lights and many, many others.

I don't care what they say, I hate CFL bulbs - they make me look green - and I don't mean that in a earth-hugging way

I'll give these LEDs a go for some outdoor lighting.

steveeb said:   I don't care what they say, I hate CFL bulbs - they make me look green - and I don't mean that in a earth-hugging way Some are better than others. Make sure you get 2700k temperature or lower if you want it to look similar to incandescent. It's just frustrating that multiple brands can say 2700k, and they are clearly different colors.

Also, CFL's are now coming in "instant-on" varieties for twice the price.

harry12 said:   I'd buy them if they'd fit my night light bases ( candelabra base? ).
However the "Fits standard light sockets" info makes me think these are too big.
Anyway... Green for BB ( so he'll keep looking ).


E27-E12 adapter .99 free ship

http://cgi.ebay.com/E12-E27-Candelabra-Bulb-Lamp-Socket-Enlarger...

Link

steveeb said:   I don't care what they say, I hate CFL bulbs - they make me look green - and I don't mean that in a earth-hugging way

I'll give these LEDs a go for some outdoor lighting.


I use soft white CFLs. They give off the typical orange tint you find with regular bulbs.

tonglu1 said:   Most Americans are unaware that incandescent light bulbs will be extinct quite soon in the U.S. As a matter of fact, under the current law, we won't be able to buy 100 Watt incandescent lght bulbs after the end of this year (2011) which is a few months from now, while 40W & 60W will be here only for 2 more years!...

I am not sure this is correct... current legislation does not really say this.

The marketing people are scaring everybody into stocking up on incandescent. Same thing happened to R-123 freon, then R-22 freon, etc becasue they contribute to ozone depletion and global warming. In fact, these were "outlawed" but they are still readily available.

SteveG

O.K. folks, I did not say that the law will ban the use of all incandescent light bulbs. Just the sale of 100 Watt incandescent bulbs will be banned starting January 1st, 2012. Two years after that, 60-watt and 40-watt bulbs will also disappear from stores.

Well, maybe the law does not explicitly ban its sale per se. (We can still use what we already bought! Just that when it's burned out, we can't go to store to buy its replacement of the same kind.)

However, to require an improvement of its efficiency by 25% is not too different from banning it as far as I can tell. We all know that the technology of incandescent light bulbs as invented by Edison is pretty mature by now. To improve its efficiency by 25% is not exactly trivial and could involve huge amount of resources in time and research efforts. Let me ask this: if the technology with such level (25%) of improvement exists today, don't you think they would have published in technical journals and newspapers by now?

harlock001 said:   tonglu1 said:   Most Americans are unaware that incandescent light bulbs will be extinct quite soon in the U.S. As a matter of fact, under the current law, we won't be able to buy 100 Watt incandescent lght bulbs after the end of this year (2011) which is a few months from now, while 40W & 60W will be here only for 2 more years!


I'd like to know your source of this info. I don't think it's right.

From the New York Times...

May 26, 2011 NYT

[T]he Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 ... requires light bulb makers to improve the efficiency of incandescent bulbs by 25 percent. The details of the law dictated a phase-out of the manufacture of certain bulbs in their current incarnation, starting with 100-watt bulbs next January.

The law does not ban the use or manufacture of all incandescent bulbs, nor does it mandate the use of compact fluorescent ones. It simply requires that companies make some of their incandescent bulbs work a bit better, meeting a series of rolling deadlines between 2012 and 2014.

Furthermore, all sorts of exemptions are written into the law, which means that all sorts of bulbs are getting a free pass and can keep their energy-guzzling ways indefinitely, including "specialty bulbs" like the [antique style, clear glass] Edison bulbs …, as well as three-way bulbs, silver-bottomed bulbs, chandelier bulbs, refrigerator bulbs, plant lights and many, many others.

Don't know how good the LED bulbs will be but I give it a try.
Thanks OP

I have a at least 30 "40 Watt equivalent" LED bulbs that produce light brighter than 100 Watt actual incandescent bulbs. I got some of these hoping they will produce around a 40 Watt equivalent amount of light which can be used for many different lighting needs. The reason I switched is because LED bulbs don't crap out wifi like CFL's, last longer, have no mercury dust when they break, and use less power than CFL's. That said, instead of hoping these things work, I think some standardization of boxes using lumens, watts used, and color spectrum should be brought to the lightbulb industry to make all this easier instead of just using words like "soft" or "40 watt equiv" which apparently mean nothing. Not ever going to happen though.

dyam45 said:   I have a at least 30 "40 Watt equivalent" LED bulbs that produce light brighter than 100 Watt actual incandescent bulbs. I got some of these hoping they will produce around a 40 Watt equivalent amount of light which can be used for many different lighting needs. The reason I switched is because LED bulbs don't crap out wifi like CFL's, last longer, have no mercury dust when they break, and use less power than CFL's. That said, instead of hoping these things work, I think some standardization of boxes using lumens, watts used, and color spectrum should be brought to the lightbulb industry to make all this easier instead of just using words like "soft" or "40 watt equiv" which apparently mean nothing. Not ever going to happen though.

What brand LED bulbs do you have?

can these titan 0.5 w bulbs be used as appliance bulbs?

I bought 2 LED bulbs from Meritline last year. They have been in fixtures that stay on 24/7, and so far they are good. However, they produce blue light, not white/yellow light. The more expensive ones actually have red and yellow LED's dispersed along with the white/blue to make the light appear more in-line with incandescant and CFL's.

I bought this set, as well. It is still svaialble on Buy.comfor this price at the marketplace through 1saleaday.

I am just going to use them in the "always on" locations, like stairwell to the basement, and closets.



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