• Page :
  • 1
  • Text Only
Voting History
rated:

Drobo1
Disclaimer

Drobo2
Disclaimer

Drobo3
Disclaimer

Drobo4
Disclaimer

Drobo5
Disclaimer
1st deal I've posted, be gentle

DROBO DR04DD10 - Max capacity 16TB at bhphotovideo.com Ends 9/30/2012

Link to Deal

While it doesn't have USB 3.0, eSata or Ethernet like one of the higher end DROBO S for 5D, this price for a DROBO is incredible.
The brand is unmatched and is the choice of IT professionals for their home systems.
Time to collect 2TB and 3TB drives to drop in.

FireWire 800 Interface
USB 2.0 Interface
Write Transfer Rates Up to 34MB/s
Read Transfer Rates Up to 52MB/s
BeyondRAID Data Protection
Single Drive Redundancy
Supports Drives Up to 4TB in Size
Drobo Dashboard 2.0 via Update
Drobo PC Backup via Download
Mac & Windows Compatible
Drive Capacity Up to four 3.5" SATA I or SATA II hard drives
Drives may be from any manufacturer
Drives may be up to 4TB capacity, spindle speed, and/or Cache

Member Summary

DROBO DR04DD10
Thanks BMWLVR82
Disclaimer
Most Recent Posts
Dunno if that line about being "unmatched" and the "choice of IT professionals" was pulled from Drobo's site or typed up... (more)

97snake (Sep. 26, 2012 @ 8:33p) |

I jumped on with an 8 drive Drobo Pro for small office backups a couple of years ago. It was fraught with problems beca... (more)

Chuck101 (Sep. 26, 2012 @ 9:25p) |

If a Drobo doesn't even make a good NAS how would it make a "cheap" SAN? Yes it's cheaper than a real SAN, but it's terr... (more)

sygyzy (Nov. 10, 2012 @ 1:15p) |

Staff Summary
Thanks for visiting FatWallet.com. Join for free to remove this ad.

Actually I think it's priced about right (maybe even a little high) given the connectivity and throughput.

No ethernet = not NAS.

Had one of these about 4 years ago, thing was noisy (fan) and would hang often. On three occasions it corrupted my data after it hung.
and it was slow. Took days to initialize four 1tb drives, and then days to fill them up due to the slow USB interface.

Don't know if they've improved it at all during that time.

Tough crowd on my first day out, have not heard a bad experience before about Drobo. But connected to my router directly or older desktop / print server, it will be my NAS.

warrendanz said:   Tough crowd on my first day out, have not heard a bad experience before about Drobo. But connected to my router directly or older desktop / print server, it will be my NAS.

It's a little bit of a stretch, but I'll grant you I didn't consider plugging it into a router w/USB. However, fact remains, that with NAS what you pay for is performance. You can get boxes that push about 100MB/sec for $300 or less that work without being dependent on a router.

Wait, so this is $249 for an external USB 2.0 hard drive enclosure with no drives? LMAO! Why does OP's title say it's a NAS when there is no ethernet port on this box? RED for bad title, RED for $249 plastic box with a fan, RED RED RED!

warrendanz said:   Tough crowd on my first day out, have not heard a bad experience before about Drobo. But connected to my router directly or older desktop / print server, it will be my NAS.I've been looking at Drobos for the last few months and the 4-bay Drobo has not budged under $299 for a while.

This is a great deal at $250, but you incorrectly calling it a NAS is causing all the reds.

A few days ago, I ended up getting a Drobo S for $529.

Check this review before you buy.

http://scottkelby.com/2012/im-done-with-drobo/

Scott kelby is the founder of The national association of professional photoshop users and is a great photographer. When you spend that much money on a back up system you really need it to work 100% of the time.

Now I don't have a need for one and the price seems decent but figured its worth getting all the facts.

Scott Kelby was not happy with Drobo's one-year warranty. But I also think he was ready to scale up. So he went with an $1800 solution.

Bottom line, if an FW'er was looking to get a 2nd gen 4-bay Drobo, this is the best price in a while. My photography friends with 4-bay Drobos have been happy with them for a few years now.

I also plan on using CrashPlan for their free offline backup option.

Hejj said:   warrendanz said:   Tough crowd on my first day out, have not heard a bad experience before about Drobo. But connected to my router directly or older desktop / print server, it will be my NAS.

It's a little bit of a stretch, but I'll grant you I didn't consider plugging it into a router w/USB. However, fact remains, that with NAS what you pay for is performance. You can get boxes that push about 100MB/sec for $300 or less that work without being dependent on a router.


Using the USB port on the router? you are going to have a bad time my friend. It will be a disaster to manage also many routers have proprietary software for using the USB port for a hard drive.

As a note, Drobo is more than a JBOD - the two big features of a Drobo are (1) you can drop different sized drives into it and it'll rebuild itself automatically, and (2) you don't have to administer it.

What does that mean? If you have a 2TB and a couple of 500gb drives lying around you can stuff them into the Drobo, then just swap the smaller drives out when you need more space.

It's pretty much admin-free. Mine's been running for around 3 years with no problems. It's survived two drive failures so far, so it works.

It's somewhat slow, but I'm not using it for live storage. It's a network backup drive (attached to a server) and streams audio/video to a bunch of Apple TVs.

The RAID implementation is proprietary, if you care, and a few of the drive recovery places actually support getting data off of Drobos now. Those of you who feel that proprietary RAID is bad are welcome to document how they recovered their data off their personal RAID system after a two/three disk failure (hint: it's practically impossible).

For offsite, I use backblaze to back up various parts of the Drobo filesystem, though any cloud backup provider should work. The first backup is always brutal, so make sure you don't exceed your data cap.

Drobo lost their chance, their boxes were too expensive & buggy.

Now they are dead with the release of Windows 8 Storage Spaces.

The posts about write speed are correct, a base Drobo is not for video editing or running an office. But perfect for me at home to feel secure with my families personal files along with 3 TB of Movies in Itunes shared to Apple TV, 2 Iphones and an Ipad. With 2 Laptops, a netbook and a desktop, this was the easiest way I could find to keep our files in one place and backed up.

Just hit two more local Targets in Miramar and Pembroke Pines and now have four of the $69 clearance Seagate Expansion 2TB externals to crack open and drop into the Drobo when it arrives Thursday. The drives are Green, so not for speed, but an effortless solution for having our 4.5 TB of data safe and always backed up.

"No ethernet = not NAS."

+1 to this. This DROBO is nothing more than a (slow) external hard drive with multiple disk support.

To be fair here, Drobo had a huge following when it was introduced, but they were plagued by slow transfer speeds causing them to lose a bit of their marketshare. I've never seen one priced this low. If you're looking for something like a drobo, I'd suggest the recently released Synology DS413j. The drive trays aren't nearly as slick ( need a sled ), but they've got a great community developing apps and they seem to have the mindshare of the market at the moment. If you're willing to wait ( it took me about 10 days for them to be in stock ) Amazon sells the ds413j for $380, with the notable difference over the ds411j being that it now has 512M of RAM instead of the anemic 128M.

Synology gets (and got) my money. Very happy with it! Drobo has lagged behind in the NAS game, IMO.

Considering you can hook up an old Mac with a FireWire 800 port to it, this isn't a bad deal. Old Mac with Lion + Drobo = NAS

Heck, Apple now offers a Thunderbolt to FireWire 800 adapter, which I have two of already.

Plus Drobo worked with Apple for Time Machine compatibility. Tempted... very tempted.

An entertaining and informative read regarding Drobo vs Synology: linky

After reading this, I'm considering returning the Drobo S and getting a Synology DS413.

Thanks resin. Your two cents helped me research Synology.

warrendanz said:   
The brand is unmatched and is the choice of IT professionals for their home systems.
Time to collect 2TB and 3TB drives to drop in.


Dunno if that line about being "unmatched" and the "choice of IT professionals" was pulled from Drobo's site or typed up by OP but, as an IT Pro, I looked at Drobo before going with a QNAP. The QNAP was a good solution, but ultimately, I needed more storage/flexibility and ended up building my own 12-drive solution instead (anyone want to buy a TS-509Pro at a sweet price? lol). Anyhow, I saw too many issues with the Drobo and I wasn't impressed with the throughput.

In terms of the drives, it should be common knowledge by now but STAY AWAY from the Western Digital Green drives. They do not play well with RAID at all (unless you want to hack the firmware on the drives) and you WILL eventually lose your RAIDset, and with it, your data.

I jumped on with an 8 drive Drobo Pro for small office backups a couple of years ago. It was fraught with problems because we ran it pretty hard. It was rack mountable and said enterprise ready, but it really was not. It was under constant read/write load due to backups going to it at night and then copying these backup files offsite for DR. Technically it worked, but turns out that the drive wants some free time in order to do space optimisations and other stuff. Tech support was pretty good and after sending them the proprietary logs that we couldn't read on our own, they sent us new firmware to allow for the unit to be run as hard as we ran it. As it was, it would randomly reboot. The new firmware helped, but did not cure the problem. I left the company before a real solution was implemented, but classic business decision that they wanted reliable backups, but didn't want to pay for the right products.
Drobo was a cheap sudo san for us, and it sortof did what we wanted. Would have been better had we not worked it so hard.
So, having said all that, I would get a small drobo like this one if I had a need and didn't plan on working it constantly.

If a Drobo doesn't even make a good NAS how would it make a "cheap" SAN? Yes it's cheaper than a real SAN, but it's terrible for what it is.



Disclaimer: By providing links to other sites, FatWallet.com does not guarantee, approve or endorse the information or products available at these sites, nor does a link indicate any association with or endorsement by the linked site to FatWallet.com.

Thanks for visiting FatWallet.com. Join for free to remove this ad.

TRUSTe online privacy certification

While FatWallet makes every effort to post correct information, offers are subject to change without notice.
Some exclusions may apply based upon merchant policies.
© 1999-2014