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Saw this item in Lowes' Black Friday "Sneak Peek" page. It's a similar design to the Cree CR6 (aka Ecosmart sold by HomeDepot) with a sealed trim built in. The 2 reviews are glowing, though neither mention whether these are dimmable.

There will undoubtedly be debate whether LEDs are worth the premium. Having enjoyed the Ecosmart Crees, I resoundingly say yes. Keep in mind that sealed trims for 6" cans sell for $15 ea so factor that into the cost (Lowes carries it too but I can't find the link). This helps save additional energy in non-sealed cans by preventing air from leaking into the attic.

My area has it for $25 without utility rebates. Localities with LED rebates might have these as low as $15. Page currently says the sale price ends 10/29/2012

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Back to $39.98 for CA

bouteill (Oct. 30, 2012 @ 12:19p) |

I have a more plausible theory. It is a fact that solid state dimmers cause RFI that can be conducted over the house wi... (more)

stevelion (Oct. 30, 2012 @ 1:03p) |

stevelion - I agree and you're correct that AC house wiring by nature transfers some noise across circuits. Proper conne... (more)

peas (Oct. 30, 2012 @ 1:34p) |

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These do appear to be dimmable, and appears to have 700 lumens vs. Cree/ HD 575 lumens. Anybody have a review of the two compared to each other?

I replaced all of the cans in my kitchen with The Home Depot units and they're great - and just as bright, if not slightly brighter, than the 65W incandecents they replaced....so if these put out even more lumens they should be really good.

Would love to get these for my kitchen but I don't have a ladder tall enough to install them .... hrmm

shastada said:   Would love to get these for my kitchen but I don't have a ladder tall enough to install them .... hrmmBam!

thinksnow said:   shastada said:   Would love to get these for my kitchen but I don't have a ladder tall enough to install them .... hrmmBam! (un)fortunately my ceilings are 14 foot high so I need a 10 foot or taller ladder. I have a little guy like this but that room is just too tall. Time to invest in a nice ladder I guess.

Any idea on the color temperature?

Bought 6 of these today for my kitchen and was able to install them all in 15 minutes. Great look, dim very well, and a nice warm white light. The box says 2700k. Awesome deal!

13W
will grab some for the kitchen and get rid of 50W halogen installed years ago.

I really want to switch some of my lights over to LEDs, but I just can't get the math to work in favor of it. Especially since they sell some 900 lumen/65W equivalent PAR38 that are rated at the same 13W for less than 1/3 of the cost of these. Since the watts used is the same, the only savings come from not needing replacement as often. Or am I missing something? Somebody tell me something that I'm overlooking. As a geek I really want to embrace the new tech.

RKBA said:   I really want to switch some of my lights over to LEDs, but I just can't get the math to work in favor of it. Especially since they sell some 900 lumen/65W equivalent PAR38 that are rated at the same 13W for less than 1/3 of the cost of these. Since the watts used is the same, the only savings come from not needing replacement as often. Or am I missing something? Somebody tell me something that I'm overlooking. As a geek I really want to embrace the new tech.Sounds like you're comparing to CFLs. Here are some advantages of good quality LEDs:
  1. Instant-on (faster than even the fastest CFLs)
  2. Better dimming -- dims lower, less flicker, less buzz (may depend on the dimmer)
  3. No UV leakage -- doesn't fade photos, paint, or damage skin (CFL creates UV which is converted to visible light in the phosphor coating)
  4. Better overall light quality
  5. Longer life (depends on specific manufacturer of course)
  6. Can better tolerate repeated on/off cycles which can prematurely kill CFLs
  7. May be better in cold weather situations
  8. Zero mercury content


Here are some details of CFL disadvantages. Currently the main drawbacks with LEDs are initial cost (which is becoming much less a factor) and often the inability to be used in enclosed fixtures due to heat buildup (yes CFLs and LEDs do still generate heat, just much less than incandescents). Sealed cans are fine since the metal enclosure acts as a giant heatsink.

Ultimately, if you like your CFLs, stick with em and get your money's worth. You'd probably be able to notice the difference with quality LEDs, but if you don't put them side by side you might not ever care.

Thanks for the info. Can't say I like the CFLs, but for the same energy used and 30% of the upfront cost (in this specific example) I'm willing to tolerate the delayed start. I figure that by the time the CFLs burn out, the LEDs will be cheaper and maybe I can justify buying them next time.

Good info. Peas. In addition on these recessed down lights, you save on the cost of a trim (~$8) if you need to replace any of your existing or if they are for a new install.

i like the cree it uses only 9watts

I purchased 7 of the Sylvania LED (Item #: 78215) lights for our kitchen 6 months ago at twice this price and we love them and don't regret the purchase. If you are considering getting LED, this is the best price I've seen for the lumens. They produce so much light we removed the hanging light over our kitchen table. Even makes the room look larger!

what recessed cans go well with these? planning on having these go in the room downstairs (no insulation). tia

These work in all 5 or 6 inch cans. I don't think they work on sloped ceilings.

Sloped ceilings shouldn't matter. The cans are the same shape whether installed flat or sloped (unless it's some weird specialty can). These install the same way as the Ecosmart Crees and I use them in sloped installations. Bigboy is right - these should work in just about any 5-6" can, sealed or not, IC or non-IC.

Just a warning to those considering LEDs. I installed 15 of the CREE units from HD in three different rooms and have had lots of trouble with (very annoying) flickering. I even replaced the dimmers with the newer Lutron LED/CFL units - no help. A couple weeks ago, it was so bad in my kitchen that I thought one of the LEDs must have gone bad. I began disconnecting the LEDs one at a time with no difference in the flickering. It took me a coupe days to figure out that my son had left my basement lights on, but dimmed all the way down to the point that the light was barely visible; this was causing my flickering. I had a similar situation with different lights last fall when the LEDs were first installed. Between the high initial cost, relatively low light output, and flickering problems, I'm not sure LED is ready for prime time.

stevelion said:   Just a warning to those considering LEDs. I installed 15 of the CREE units from HD in three different rooms and have had lots of trouble with (very annoying) flickering. I even replaced the dimmers with the newer Lutron LED/CFL units - no help. A couple weeks ago, it was so bad in my kitchen that I thought one of the LEDs must have gone bad. I began disconnecting the LEDs one at a time with no difference in the flickering. It took me a coupe days to figure out that my son had left my basement lights on, but dimmed all the way down to the point that the light was barely visible; this was causing my flickering. I had a similar situation with different lights last fall when the LEDs were first installed. Between the high initial cost, relatively low light output, and flickering problems, I'm not sure LED is ready for prime time.That type of behavior is usually indicative of a wiring problem. Excessive noise from one circuit is making its way onto another. You really have to get an experienced electrician to determine what's going on there. If LEDs are having this type of crosstalk flicker, CFLs would likely behave the same or worse. Hey think of it as a feature If the lights hadn't behaved like that, you'd never have known the basement lights were burning money.

NM.

I have (6) 8" cans that use hard to find 4 prong 3 bulb CFL's. I think the cans have a ballast and starter. Do I need to buy new cans to use these, or can i rewire the old cans?

For NH residents there is a $10 off each fixture (maximum of 12 rebates) in-store coupon from nhsaves. Information about the program can be found here

ChalPhut said:   For NH residents there is a $10 off each fixture (maximum of 12 rebates) in-store coupon from nhsaves. Information about the program can be found here
Any program in NY for this??

Anyone heard of a rebate for California? A $10 rebate per fixture would make this a steal!

Back to $39.98 for CA

peas said:   stevelion said:   Just a warning to those considering LEDs. I installed 15 of the CREE units from HD in three different rooms and have had lots of trouble with (very annoying) flickering. I even replaced the dimmers with the newer Lutron LED/CFL units - no help. A couple weeks ago, it was so bad in my kitchen that I thought one of the LEDs must have gone bad. I began disconnecting the LEDs one at a time with no difference in the flickering. It took me a coupe days to figure out that my son had left my basement lights on, but dimmed all the way down to the point that the light was barely visible; this was causing my flickering. I had a similar situation with different lights last fall when the LEDs were first installed. Between the high initial cost, relatively low light output, and flickering problems, I'm not sure LED is ready for prime time.That type of behavior is usually indicative of a wiring problem. Excessive noise from one circuit is making its way onto another. You really have to get an experienced electrician to determine what's going on there. If LEDs are having this type of crosstalk flicker, CFLs would likely behave the same or worse. Hey think of it as a feature If the lights hadn't behaved like that, you'd never have known the basement lights were burning money.

I have a more plausible theory. It is a fact that solid state dimmers cause RFI that can be conducted over the house wiring. The RFI levels get worse as the load approaches the dimmers maximum rating. It also gets worse as the lights are dimmed. This dimmer in my basement us at its maximum load of 600w. My therory is that the RFI from this is causing the interference or "noise" that is causing the LEDs to flicker. I think we are in agreement so far? In any case, I was an electrician and I'm not aware of any special wiring practices in residential applications that would isolate noise on one circuit from affecting another circuit in the house. Any such isloation is highly specialized and limited typically to advanced lighting control, home theater, home automation, or other applications especially sensitive to noise. The lack of such noise isolation circuitry is not a "problem," but a common reality of the vast majority of residential circuits.

stevelion - I agree and you're correct that AC house wiring by nature transfers some noise across circuits. Proper connections usually dampen the noise especially at longer distances (hence why it's difficult for powerline ethernet to reach some outlets). I've seen some bad wiring where the neutral on an outlet was loose, or the neutral wasn't connected to ground in the breaker box, resulting in noise traveling further than it should have.



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