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Ring
Thanks Farfisa850
Disclaimer
Stone: Diamond, 3/4 Carat DTW
Color: F-G
Clarity: I1
Certification: Card Included
Metal: 14K White Gold
Size: 5, 6, 7, 8, 9
Jewelry Category: Diamond Solitaire Ring
Packaging: Gift Box
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Sounds like a nice deal but this is what the diamond can actually look like. I1 / F-G

It seems that there is no suitable size for me. Thanks anyhow.

Some one please advise to buy or not?

I1-I2-I3
Included (three grades). Inclusions visible under 10x magnification AS WELL AS to the human eye.

If you choose to buy an I1-I3 diamond know that some people will look at it and immediately see the flaws -- and not just experienced jewelers.

Some reasonable observations to consider when buying diamonds: Text
Edit: Butcherboy, I appreciate all your hard work on FW, and apologize for the red, but this deal had two greens, and I can't imagine these stones are anywhere near decent. I strongly recommend avoiding this deal.

Here are some thoughts I wrote a while back about buying a diamond after contemplating how to help make inexperienced purchasers more sophisticated (I don't think purchasers will be pleased with this stone). I hope you find them useful:

I've commented on jewelry enough times on FW that I generally don't bother anymore, because the same point is repeated over and over. But today I thought of a new analogy that I hope will help people understand what makes some diamonds much more valuable than others. It is confusing, because, after all, they are all called "diamonds," and they are sold by weight. It is difficult for a layperson to comprehend the enormous difference in pricing of diamonds of the same size. Most people are aware of the the "4 C's." Cut, carat, color, and clarity are all important. Other than carat weight, these determine the fire and brilliance of your stone, which are what make good quality diamonds so captivating. Compounding the difficulty is the fact that grading standards vary widely (thus the jewelers' expression, "buy the stone, not the grade"). I have read much nonsense on these forums passed off as buying advice for diamonds, such as I1 stones are not worth buying, or don't buy color less than "F." Actually, when a conservative grader rates a stone I1, it may be a very beautiful gem indeed. Most observers will not see inclusions with the naked eye. Further, a skilled craftsperson will set the stone to minimize any distractions. Problems arise from sellers who either grade their own merchandise (it is common to grade two or even three grades above conservative grading for clarity) or pass along gradings from unscrupulous or incompetent graders. Keep in mind that the grading system as originally developed was to apply to "gem quality" stones only. Thus, if a stone was worthy of bothering to grade, it was worthy of including in a piece of jewelry. Given the relaxed standards of many sellers, this can no longer be relied upon. Thus, when a stone is represented as "I1" (traditionally the lowest acceptable jewelry grade), it is likely that it is not of jewelry quality. "I2-i3" is an "invented" classification. Whenever you see it, be prepared to be disappointed.

Having said all of this, I suggest that when you see the word "diamond" in the context of a product for sale, that you think of it in the same way that you would when you learn of a "painting" for sale. A Monet or a Rembrandt will be worth a great deal of money and will be considered quite rare and beautiful. On the other hand, a poorly done work by an unknown artist will be difficult to sell at a garage sale, even for a dollar. Yet they are both known as "paintings." The same is true of diamonds. Nature has created some extraordinary stones of great worth. There are many more, like paintings, that have significant value because they are unique and attractive. Then, there is by far the most numerous type of diamonds (again like paintings) that are common and somewhat attractive. These are cheaply available to those in the trade. At the bottom end of this variety are stones that cost only pennies (literally). These are unfortunately often sold as gems to unsuspecting buyers. Even so, they may have some aesthetic appeal, and they are at the least, interesting mineral specimens. Nonetheless, the jewelry they are part of is intrinsically worth no more than had the stones been CZ or an inexpensive natural stone. Their worth is that of the gold or platinum (or some cheaper metal, frequently used for the poorest quality stones) used plus the labor of cutting and setting the gem. Poor quality stones add virtually nothing to the value of the piece, therefore the purchase of the piece is best considered a purchase of precious metal. The price paid should reflect this, and not be inflated because something that can legally be called a "diamond" is included.
I hope this helps when you are considering the purchase of a diamond product.

MothersNghtmare said:   Sounds like a nice deal but this is what the diamond can actually look like. I1 / F-G

FUD!!!

There's virtually no way that's a legitimate I1. It's an I3 at best. I suspect that the setting on that pic is sterling silver and is HEAVILY tarnished. That is why it appears to be so dark. An F is colorless! G is near colorless.

My conclusion: the pic you have is an "out of context" pic of a diamond in a sterling setting that was probably found in a gutter.

Here are some sample pics:
http://www.brilliance.com/diamonds/0.43-carat-marquise-g-color-i...
http://www.israel-diamonds.com/product/Diamond/sg/27185.aspx?Ret...
http://www.diamonds-usa.com/diamonds/diamond_details.asp?wizard=...

HOWEVER: This is not a really good price and I would not recommend this for an engagement ring. Spend $500 and get a quality 1/3 carat in the SI+ range and you will be much happier.

If the setting is really gold that is probably worth $100-$150 on that. Now the I1 diamond (probably 12-3) with that poor/fair symmetry will not be too much to look at but still 3/4 ct. This is probably a couple hundred off a good deal but since it is from 1Sale it might just be an OK offer.

I'd rather own something like THIS. It's real 14K gold and a man made diamond. Indistinguishable from a natural diamond. Has all the beauty with none of the over-inflation in diamond pricing.

1SaleADay is great for cheap (under $20 bucks or so). Spending though $500 on one of these budget sites...is for a lack of censored word quite "silly".

DamnoIT said:   If the setting is really gold that is probably worth $100-$150 on that. Now the I1 diamond (probably 12-3) with that poor/fair symmetry will not be too much to look at but still 3/4 ct. This is probably a couple hundred off a good deal but since it is from 1Sale it might just be an OK offer.

Sorry, no way is the setting worth that in gold. Compare it with this 14k setting that appears to have twice as much mass. You will note that it is two grams; the one in this deal may be a gram. It is flimsy. One gram of 14k gold is worth 30-35 dollars. A poor quality diamond is simply not worth very much. It does not do what a diamond is valued for as jewelry.Text

suezyque said:   I'd rather own something like THIS. It's real 14K gold and a man made diamond. Indistinguishable from a natural diamond. Has all the beauty with none of the over-inflation in diamond pricing.

Sorry, Suzyque, but not indistinguishable and not a man made diamond. It is described as such in violation of FTC regs. Note the hardness. Also note the seller uses man-made and simulated interchangeably. They are not the same thing. By the way, I agree that a good fake is more pleasing in many ways than a bad diamond, and have said so in the past. I strongly object to misrepresentations, however, and that is what this eBay seller is doing. It is either a man-made diamond or a simulated diamond. It cannot be both.

christmas said:   suezyque said:   I'd rather own something like THIS. It's real 14K gold and a man made diamond. Indistinguishable from a natural diamond. Has all the beauty with none of the over-inflation in diamond pricing.

Sorry, Suzyque, but not indistinguishable and not a man made diamond. It is described as such in violation of FTC regs. Note the hardness. Also note the seller uses man-made and simulated interchangeably. They are not the same thing. By the way, I agree that a good fake is more pleasing in many ways than a bad diamond, and have said so in the past. I strongly object to misrepresentations, however, and that is what this eBay seller is doing. It is either a man-made diamond or a simulated diamond. It cannot be both.


What is the difference between simulated and man made? He seems to get very good feedback on his stuff. Also, are you saying that you could tell the difference between this stone and a natural diamond without testing equipment? He indicates the hardness to be 9.1, are you saying that isn't possible?

suezyque said:   christmas said:   suezyque said:   I'd rather own something like THIS. It's real 14K gold and a man made diamond. Indistinguishable from a natural diamond. Has all the beauty with none of the over-inflation in diamond pricing.

Sorry, Suzyque, but not indistinguishable and not a man made diamond. It is described as such in violation of FTC regs. Note the hardness. Also note the seller uses man-made and simulated interchangeably. They are not the same thing. By the way, I agree that a good fake is more pleasing in many ways than a bad diamond, and have said so in the past. I strongly object to misrepresentations, however, and that is what this eBay seller is doing. It is either a man-made diamond or a simulated diamond. It cannot be both.


What is the difference between simulated and man made? He seems to get very good feedback on his stuff. Also, are you saying that you could tell the difference between this stone and a natural diamond without testing equipment? He indicates the hardness to be 9.1, are you saying that isn't possible?


A simulant is a product designed to mimic a more valuable product. For example, some diamond simulants are cubic zirconia and moissanite. Man made gems are chemically identical to natural gems. In other words, man-made (or synthetic) gems are the same substance, but laboratory created. For example, sapphires have been synthesized for over 100 years. While the hardness of synthetic diamonds can be varied, I know of no reason to create them at moh's of 9.1. I suspect you may learn the true nature of the stones in question on this site
: TextYour other question is a "straw man." I stand by my post.

Here is more: Ashaź
Asha Simulated Diamonds
Ashaź is a branded form of cubic zirconia and is advertised as the only diamond simulant in the world that employs a patent pending form of "Amorphous Diamond" which is man-made and "composed of a multitude of tiny diamond crystals all aligned together." These microscopic diamond crystals are blasted into the Ashaź crystal through the Amorphous Diamond Treatment (ADT) process to give Ashaź an upper layer that is both simulant and man-made diamond crystal. They describe this process as being "Diamond Infused", as atomic force microscope analysis shows that the microscopic diamond crystals literally penetrate into the upper layers of the Ashaź crystal, to form a new hybrid diamond simulant.
Source:Text

Your other question is a "straw man."

You lost me there. Care to explain "straw man"?

1SaleADay is crap on jewelry. Don't even buy the $20 stuff. I did and now here bitching... LOL

GAL certified is CRAP! 3/4 carat is .75 or .77
Any cert with a price attached is only to rip off insurance companies.



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