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Slickone said:   horizon6 said:   Slickone said:   Isn't 90W a bit high for a 42" LED these days? Isn't lower wattage the main reason for getting LED? The Toshiba 40E220U 40" 1080p that's going to be $179 on BF is not LED and is 99W. The Samsung 32" LED right now for $250 is only 28W.

What electric consumption ratings are you citing?
Annual usage on Energy Star label seems to conflict with the numbers you have, e.g.
http://cdgenp01.csd.toshiba.com/content/product/pdf_files/energy...

For which one?


40E220U: http://us.toshiba.com/tv/lcd/40e220u/

horizon6 said:   Slickone said:   horizon6 said:   Slickone said:   Isn't 90W a bit high for a 42" LED these days? Isn't lower wattage the main reason for getting LED? The Toshiba 40E220U 40" 1080p that's going to be $179 on BF is not LED and is 99W. The Samsung 32" LED right now for $250 is only 28W.

What electric consumption ratings are you citing?
Annual usage on Energy Star label seems to conflict with the numbers you have, e.g.
http://cdgenp01.csd.toshiba.com/content/product/pdf_files/energy...

For which one?


40E220U: http://us.toshiba.com/tv/lcd/40e220u/

Here's one place:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16889253293
"Power Consumption 99W"


Image
Disclaimer
Slickone said:   horizon6 said:   Slickone said:   horizon6 said:   Slickone said:   Isn't 90W a bit high for a 42" LED these days? Isn't lower wattage the main reason for getting LED? The Toshiba 40E220U 40" 1080p that's going to be $179 on BF is not LED and is 99W. The Samsung 32" LED right now for $250 is only 28W.

What electric consumption ratings are you citing?
Annual usage on Energy Star label seems to conflict with the numbers you have, e.g.
http://cdgenp01.csd.toshiba.com/content/product/pdf_files/energy...

For which one?


40E220U: http://us.toshiba.com/tv/lcd/40e220u/

Here's one place:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16889253293
"Power Consumption 99W"


99W /? do your arithmetic. Looks like per hour from the image on the same page and attached to this comment. Looks like the cost in low-mid of the pack of comparables. Of course, YMMV.


IMAGE
Disclaimer
horizon6 said:   Slickone said:   horizon6 said:   Slickone said:   horizon6 said:   Slickone said:   Isn't 90W a bit high for a 42" LED these days? Isn't lower wattage the main reason for getting LED? The Toshiba 40E220U 40" 1080p that's going to be $179 on BF is not LED and is 99W. The Samsung 32" LED right now for $250 is only 28W.

What electric consumption ratings are you citing?
Annual usage on Energy Star label seems to conflict with the numbers you have, e.g.
http://cdgenp01.csd.toshiba.com/content/product/pdf_files/energy...

For which one?


40E220U: http://us.toshiba.com/tv/lcd/40e220u/

Here's one place:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16889253293
"Power Consumption 99W"


99W /? do your arithmetic. Looks like per hour from the image on the same page and attached to this comment. Looks like the cost in low-mid of the pack of comparables. Of course, YMMV.


And yes, here's the label for a Samsung 32 indicating much lower energy consumption.

horizon6 said:   Slickone said:   horizon6 said:   Slickone said:   horizon6 said:   Slickone said:   Isn't 90W a bit high for a 42" LED these days? Isn't lower wattage the main reason for getting LED? The Toshiba 40E220U 40" 1080p that's going to be $179 on BF is not LED and is 99W. The Samsung 32" LED right now for $250 is only 28W.

What electric consumption ratings are you citing?
Annual usage on Energy Star label seems to conflict with the numbers you have, e.g.
http://cdgenp01.csd.toshiba.com/content/product/pdf_files/energy...

For which one?


40E220U: http://us.toshiba.com/tv/lcd/40e220u/

Here's one place:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16889253293
"Power Consumption 99W"


99W /? do your arithmetic. Looks like per hour from the image on the same page and attached to this comment. Looks like the cost in low-mid of the pack of comparables. Of course, YMMV.

What arithmetic? The specs for it on every website say 99W, which means 99W. Simple as that. Wattage is not based on time. If the energy guide label doesn't agree, then either the specs or energy guide is wrong. Considering it's not LED, I'd say the energy guide.

Slickone said:   horizon6 said:   Slickone said:   horizon6 said:   Slickone said:   horizon6 said:   Slickone said:   Isn't 90W a bit high for a 42" LED these days? Isn't lower wattage the main reason for getting LED? The Toshiba 40E220U 40" 1080p that's going to be $179 on BF is not LED and is 99W. The Samsung 32" LED right now for $250 is only 28W.

What electric consumption ratings are you citing?
Annual usage on Energy Star label seems to conflict with the numbers you have, e.g.
http://cdgenp01.csd.toshiba.com/content/product/pdf_files/energy...

For which one?


40E220U: http://us.toshiba.com/tv/lcd/40e220u/

Here's one place:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16889253293
"Power Consumption 99W"


99W /? do your arithmetic. Looks like per hour from the image on the same page and attached to this comment. Looks like the cost in low-mid of the pack of comparables. Of course, YMMV.

What arithmetic? The specs for it on every website say 99W, which means 99W. Simple as that. Wattage is not based on time. If the energy guide label doesn't agree, then either the specs or energy guide is wrong. Considering it's not LED, I'd say the energy guide.



Confusion of watts, watt-hours, and watts per hour

The terms power and energy are frequently confused. Power is the rate at which energy is generated or consumed.

For example, when a light bulb with a power rating of 100W is turned on for one hour, the energy used is 100 watt-hours (Wh), 0.1 kilowatt-hour, or 360 kJ. This same amount of energy would light a 40-watt bulb for 2.5 hours, or a 50-watt bulb for 2 hours. A power station would be rated in multiples of watts, but its annual energy sales would be in multiples of watt-hours. A kilowatt-hour is the amount of energy equivalent to a steady power of 1 kilowatt running for 1 hour, or 3.6 MJ (1000 watts x 3600 seconds (i.e., 60 seconds/minute x 60 minutes/hour) = 3600000 Joules = 3.6 MJ).

Terms such as watts per hour are often misused.[16] Watts per hour properly refers to the change of power per hour. Watts per hour (W/h) might be useful to characterize the ramp-up behavior of power plants. For example, a power plant that reaches a power output of 1 MW from 0 MW in 15 minutes has a ramp-up rate of 4 MW/h. Hydroelectric power plants have a very high ramp-up rate, which makes them particularly useful in peak load and emergency situations.

Major energy production or consumption is often expressed as terawatt-hours for a given period that is often a calendar year or financial year. One terawatt-hour is equal to a sustained power of approximately 114 megawatts for a period of one year.

The watt second is a unit of energy, equal to the joule. One kilowatt-hour is 3,600,000 watt-seconds. The watt-second is used, for example, to rate the energy storage of flash lamps used in photography, although the term joule is normally used rather than watt-second.
(Link)

horizon6 said:   Slickone said:   horizon6 said:   Slickone said:   horizon6 said:   Slickone said:   horizon6 said:   Slickone said:   Isn't 90W a bit high for a 42" LED these days? Isn't lower wattage the main reason for getting LED? The Toshiba 40E220U 40" 1080p that's going to be $179 on BF is not LED and is 99W. The Samsung 32" LED right now for $250 is only 28W.

What electric consumption ratings are you citing?
Annual usage on Energy Star label seems to conflict with the numbers you have, e.g.
http://cdgenp01.csd.toshiba.com/content/product/pdf_files/energy...

For which one?


40E220U: http://us.toshiba.com/tv/lcd/40e220u/

Here's one place:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16889253293
"Power Consumption 99W"


99W /? do your arithmetic. Looks like per hour from the image on the same page and attached to this comment. Looks like the cost in low-mid of the pack of comparables. Of course, YMMV.

What arithmetic? The specs for it on every website say 99W, which means 99W. Simple as that. Wattage is not based on time. If the energy guide label doesn't agree, then either the specs or energy guide is wrong. Considering it's not LED, I'd say the energy guide.



Confusion of watts, watt-hours, and watts per hour

Specs show wattage (W), not watt-hours (Wh).

From the specs on Best Buy's site (for the year):

Energy Consumption (kWh/year) 145
Estimated Yearly Operating Cost $16

Yep. That's a different, Energy Consumption rating. 145kWh/year. But the TV power consumption is 99W. To power the TV, it uses 99W instantaneously. When it's on, it's using 99W (on average).

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16889253293
Power Consumption: 99W
http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/SearchTools/item-details...
Power Consumption, 99W
http://www.vanns.com/shop/servlet/item/features/462430931
Power consumption: 99W
http://www.beachcamera.com/shop/product.aspx?sku=TB40E220U
Power Consumption (On): 99W
http://reviews.cnet.com/flat-panel-tvs/toshiba-40e220u/4507-6482...
Power consumption operational 99 Watt

Ya I get what you're saying too. But I believe in using the Energy Consumption as a more real-world measurement to me (my pocketbook). The Toshiba 50L2200U LED has a 90W power consumption. Much closer to the range of this TV, so it's not crazy by any means, and the Toshiba 40L2200U has a 66W power consumption. So perhaps it's less energy-efficient.

It that stops anyone from buying this 42" back-lit LED at $300 (with supposedly a nice screen according to reviews I've glanced at, audio is perhaps lacking; after tweaking the settings), then move along ... nothing to see here



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