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EVGA 01G-P3-N988-TR GeForce 9800 GT HDMI 1GB 256-bit DDR3 PCI Express 2.0 x16 HDCP Ready SLI Support Video Card $54.99 - $25 rebate card, Free Shipping @ Newegg


EVGA 9800gt $30Ar @ Newegg

Comes with free Duke Nukem game

This is the cheapest card on the market that is nVidia 3D Vision compatible for playing 3D games and 3D Blu-Rays with a compatible monitor and the nVidia kit.

Specs:

Brand: EVGA
Model01G-P3-N988-TR
Interface PCI Express 2.0 x16Chipset
Chipset Manufacturer NVIDIA
GPU GeForce 9800 GT
Core Clock: 550MHz
Shader Clock: 1375MHz
CUDA Cores: 112Memory
Effective Memory Clock: 1800MHz
Memory Size: 1GB
Memory Interface: 256-bit
Memory Type: DDR3 3D API
DirectXDirect: X 10
OpenGL OpenGL 3.1

Ports
HDMI1 x HDMI
D-SUB1 x D-SUB
DVI1 x DVI

General
Max Resolution 2560 x 1600
3D VISION Game Ready: Yes
SLI Support: SLI Ready
Cooler With Fan
System Requirements: Minimum of a 400 Watt power supply. (Minimum recommended power supply with +12 Volt current rating of 26 Amps.)
Power Connector 6 Pin
Dual-Link DVI Supported Yes
HDCP Ready Yes
Card Dimensions 9"L x 4.376"H

Features
NVIDIA nView Multi-Display Technology
Digital Vibrance Control (DVC) Technology
NVIDIA GigaThread Technology
True 128-Bit Floating Point High Dynamic-Range (HDR)
NVIDIA CUDA Support
NVIDIA PhysX Ready
NVIDIA PureVideo HD Technology
Unified Shader Architecture
NVIDIA Lumenex EngineManufacturer

Warranty
Parts 2 years limited
Labor 2 years limited

Newegg
See Newegg discounts that earn 1.0% FatWallet Cash Back.
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Link for the lazy

AcidSpectrum said:   Link for the lazy

Crap - I fogot to add the link in the OP. Ommission corrected. Thanks.

Maybe OT. But this card always reminds me how PC/computing advances have "slowed down" in the recent years compared to the late 90's and early 20's. The 8800GT (which is pretty much the same as 9800GT) was a card released back in 2006, and here we are, 6 years later, many of the "newest" entry level cards with all the latest specs still fall far behind the 8800GT in terms of real raw power. Can you imagine any 2002 video card vs 2008, or 1999 vs 2005?

This card can probably be considered a landmark. Does anyone remember all the "wows" around it when it first came out dominating all the benchmarks by big margins?

Then there's the memory of Intel increasing their Pentium CPU's frequency by 33/66/100mhz weekly... Good old days!

startover said:   Maybe OT. But this card always reminds me how PC/computing advances have "slowed down" in the recent years compared to the late 90's and early 20's. The 8800GT (which is pretty much the same as 9800GT) was a card released back in 2006, and here we are, 6 years later, many of the "newest" entry level cards with all the latest specs still fall far behind the 8800GT in terms of real raw power. Can you imagine any 2002 video card vs 2008, or 1999 vs 2005?

This card can probably be considered a landmark. Does anyone remember all the "wows" around it when it first came out dominating all the benchmarks by big margins?

Then there's the memory of Intel increasing their Pentium CPU's frequency by 33/66/100mhz weekly... Good old days!


I still remember the 8800GT and its Crysis benchmarks from 4 or 5 years ago. It was definitely a big step forward in terms of "affordable" graphics.

I need a card for a system I'm building. Gaming grade. What's the new "wow" card?

NightShadow said:   I need a card for a system I'm building. Gaming grade. What's the new "wow" card?

7770 is a good entry-level card. 7750 if you don't have an extra 6-pin PCI-E power cable available on your PSU.

7950 if you want to go really high-end.

Anyways, I'm really surprised to see this card for sale still. It's ancient. Sure, it was good in it's day, but then again, so was the 7800GTX, and you don't see them still being sold, do you?

These cards are noisy and hot, compared to today's video cards. I wouldn't buy one of these (even though it's cheap), if you care about power-consumption or noise at all. (NOT a HTPC card.)

Get a 6570 if need to play 3D Blu-Ray.

For an older gaming rig (2+ years old games, Core2Duo or Core2Quad CPU), then this card could make sense. For modern games, get a 7770 or better.

startover said:   Maybe OT. But this card always reminds me how PC/computing advances have "slowed down" in the recent years compared to the late 90's and early 20's. The 8800GT (which is pretty much the same as 9800GT) was a card released back in 2006, and here we are, 6 years later, many of the "newest" entry level cards with all the latest specs still fall far behind the 8800GT in terms of real raw power. Can you imagine any 2002 video card vs 2008, or 1999 vs 2005?

This card can probably be considered a landmark. Does anyone remember all the "wows" around it when it first came out dominating all the benchmarks by big margins?

Then there's the memory of Intel increasing their Pentium CPU's frequency by 33/66/100mhz weekly... Good old days!


Yep, gamed happily for 2 years on this card. Bought it when it first came out for maybe $225 which was probably the most I had ever spent on a VC but what an investment. Now you spend $325 for something that MIGHT last you 2 years :/

VirtuaL said:   NightShadow said:   I need a card for a system I'm building. Gaming grade. What's the new "wow" card?

7770 is a good entry-level card. 7750 if you don't have an extra 6-pin PCI-E power cable available on your PSU.

7950 if you want to go really high-end.

Anyways, I'm really surprised to see this card for sale still. It's ancient. Sure, it was good in it's day, but then again, so was the 7800GTX, and you don't see them still being sold, do you?

These cards are noisy and hot, compared to today's video cards. I wouldn't buy one of these (even though it's cheap), if you care about power-consumption or noise at all. (NOT a HTPC card.)

Get a 6570 if need to play 3D Blu-Ray.

For an older gaming rig (2+ years old games, Core2Duo or Core2Quad CPU), then this card could make sense. For modern games, get a 7770 or better.


I pretty much agree with you on all points and depending on screen size would even say for 3-4 year old games. If it's a 17" 1280x1024 LCD then you could get decent mileage from this card but that being said the rebate is IMHO an unnecessary hassle for such an old card. They should not be playing rebate games with this just sell it outright for $29 or $25

It's still for sale today because of the very fact that a sub $50 budget card today can only be used for HTPC. Sure, everyone knows that they can't be used for "modern games", but the failure imho, is that they also struggle (big time) with very old games, especially at high resolution + high detail. We're talking about the very popular non graphic intense games such as the MOBA series (LoL/HoN/Dota2 etc) and RTS games (Starcraft 2 etc). The 8800GT simply destroys those cards for this type of usage, and it's half a decade older!

The trend seemed to start when Nvidia/ATI started releasing the higher end cards first, then came out with the "newer but slower" cards for specialty purpose such as HTPC. The problem is, they never advertised those as HTPC only cards or even hinted at it. On every box you will find how "great" they are for gaming, along with all the latest Direct X bell and whistle. This can cause massive confusion for the non computer savvy. Real life case: a friend bought a 9600 series card (forgot whether its GS GSO or GT) in 2008, two years after 8800GT was released. He played one game only: DOTA, a game based on a then 5-year-old game Warcraft 3 TFT released in 2003. He could not understand why his "latest" card could not max out the game at 60fps on his 1680x1050 monitor. And you know what? They went on to release 9400GT half a year later, an even slower card, just because it uses less power. These cards also allowed all the major OEM's to advertise many of their new systems to be "great" for gaming just because they had a "dedicated video card". Guess how many clueless people bought into them! This kind of thing went on for many years and is still happening today. GT620? I bet it still cannot max out the now 9 year old TFT given a good crowded map!

I have no problem for low powered cards. But imo they should use a completely different model system for those cards, because it's just not right to advertise them with all the DirectX 9999 capabilities without mentioning that they would fail at 5 year old games. In the computing world, things should move forward, not backward.

startover said:   I have no problem for low powered cards. But imo they should use a completely different model system for those cards, because it's just not right to advertise them with all the DirectX 9999 capabilities without mentioning that they would fail at 5 year old games. In the computing world, things should move forward, not backward.

I agree with you. I guess this card isn't that bad, when compared to those "cheap" HTPC-type modern cards, for gaming. It will still hold its own for 1024x768 or 1280x1024 or around that for gaming.

Just don't expect to play cutting-edge games at 1080P with this card.

It could also prove useful for Folding@Home, those older cards could get 4K PPD sometimes.



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