Carbon Monoxide Alarm Deal $31.57

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Amazon is running a Lightning Deal on Kidde KN-COPP-3 Nighthawk Plug-In Carbon Monoxide Alarm with Battery Backup and Digital Display, Yesterday the price was $41.40. Today’s deal price is $31.57, http://www.amazon.com/gp/goldbox/ref=cs_top_nav_gb27
This unit is "plug and play" with battery backup and digital readout. 223 reviews with a 3.7 average rating tells me Amazon sells many. If you have a furnace, hot water heater, gas fireplace you need one or more CO’s. Most states have passed laws requiring it. http://www.kidde.com/safetymadesimple/pages/knowaboutco.aspx


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Kidde KN-COPP-3 Nighthawk Plug-In Carbon Monoxide Alarm
Thanks Valtron9000
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Sweet d deal Leo!!

getting one of thesee

Great deal, $10.00 off. Carbon monoxide (CO)is often referred to as the silent killer because it's odorless, tasteless, and invisible. This unit is a plug-in unit with battery backup and digital display that shows CO level. Every condo, apartment and house should have a CO detector.


1st alert does not use UL to test there products. They use an outside service but not UL because it cost more to use UL. Would not buy one from 1st alert.

My costo in Canoga Park, CA, has this for $18.xx. battery back up and plug in . bot 2. Great deal.

thanks for the deal OP. can always use one of these.

Slimleo said:   1st alert does not use UL to test there products. They use an outside service but not UL because it cost more to use UL. Would not buy one from 1st alert.
Meets UL2034 standard

25% of reviews are 1-star. Something not right there.

Thorin78 said:   Costco has the 1st alert ones for $22
one review for the First Alert Carbon Monoxide Alarm CO614CP1
at Amazon:
There is, however, one annoying 'feature' with this product. Every once in a while (something like six months), one of the two units may start to 'chirp' and the digital display shows 'bAt'. According to the product manual, that means the backup battery is low and needs to be replaced. At first I followed the instructions and replaced the 9V battery. But after this happened a few times, I got suspicious. So I tested the battery and found it to be still fresh (battery voltage over 9V). I then re-inserted the same battery into the unit, and ran TEST to make sure the unit is functioning correctly. Doing so seems to keep the unit happy for the next six months to a year, but then the 'chirp' returns and I have to repeat this process again.

It appears to me that the 'Low Battery' signal is actually triggered by a timer, rather than the actual battery status. Maybe this 'feature' is designed to make sure the user tests the battery at least once a year. But since most average users have no way to check the status of their batteries, they are just going to throw away perfectly good 9V batteries because of this 'feature'.

As to the digital display featured on this product, it turns out to be less useful than I have hoped. The display can only show carbon monoxide concentration in discrete steps such as 0/30/70/150 ppm (parts per million). It does NOT register any level lower than 30 ppm.

but wait,
it seems the Kidde KN-COPP-3
has the same low rating "features"

RegUSPatOff said:   Thorin78 said:   Costco has the 1st alert ones for $22
one review for the First Alert Carbon Monoxide Alarm CO614CP1
at Amazon:
There is, however, one annoying 'feature' with this product. Every once in a while (something like six months), one of the two units may start to 'chirp' and the digital display shows 'bAt'. According to the product manual, that means the backup battery is low and needs to be replaced. At first I followed the instructions and replaced the 9V battery. But after this happened a few times, I got suspicious. So I tested the battery and found it to be still fresh (battery voltage over 9V). I then re-inserted the same battery into the unit, and ran TEST to make sure the unit is functioning correctly. Doing so seems to keep the unit happy for the next six months to a year, but then the 'chirp' returns and I have to repeat this process again.

It appears to me that the 'Low Battery' signal is actually triggered by a timer, rather than the actual battery status. Maybe this 'feature' is designed to make sure the user tests the battery at least once a year. But since most average users have no way to check the status of their batteries, they are just going to throw away perfectly good 9V batteries because of this 'feature'.

As to the digital display featured on this product, it turns out to be less useful than I have hoped. The display can only show carbon monoxide concentration in discrete steps such as 0/30/70/150 ppm (parts per million). It does NOT register any level lower than 30 ppm.

but wait,
it seems the Kidde KN-COPP-3
has the same low rating "features"


Some Kidde detectors are even worse. They will stop working after 7 years and manufacturer shamelessly says that in the manual. "Seven (7) years after initial power up, this unit will “chirp” twice every 30 seconds. This is an “operational end of life” feature which will indicate that it is time to replace the alarm."

zubrin said:   RegUSPatOff said:   Thorin78 said:   Costco has the 1st alert ones for $22
one review for the First Alert Carbon Monoxide Alarm CO614CP1
at Amazon:
There is, however, one annoying 'feature' with this product. Every once in a while (something like six months), one of the two units may start to 'chirp' and the digital display shows 'bAt'. According to the product manual, that means the backup battery is low and needs to be replaced. At first I followed the instructions and replaced the 9V battery. But after this happened a few times, I got suspicious. So I tested the battery and found it to be still fresh (battery voltage over 9V). I then re-inserted the same battery into the unit, and ran TEST to make sure the unit is functioning correctly. Doing so seems to keep the unit happy for the next six months to a year, but then the 'chirp' returns and I have to repeat this process again.

It appears to me that the 'Low Battery' signal is actually triggered by a timer, rather than the actual battery status. Maybe this 'feature' is designed to make sure the user tests the battery at least once a year. But since most average users have no way to check the status of their batteries, they are just going to throw away perfectly good 9V batteries because of this 'feature'.

As to the digital display featured on this product, it turns out to be less useful than I have hoped. The display can only show carbon monoxide concentration in discrete steps such as 0/30/70/150 ppm (parts per million). It does NOT register any level lower than 30 ppm.

but wait,
it seems the Kidde KN-COPP-3
has the same low rating "features"


Some Kidde detectors are even worse. They will stop working after 7 years and manufacturer shamelessly says that in the manual. "Seven (7) years after initial power up, this unit will “chirp” twice every 30 seconds. This is an “operational end of life” feature which will indicate that it is time to replace the alarm."


On the other hand maybe whatever does the CO detection has worn out after 7 years, and it's not safe to rely on it as an alarm anymore. Makes sense to me.


UL-EOL-REQ
Disclaimer
"Alarms have a limited useful life. Replace CO alarms every five years and smoke alarms every 10 years." (Source: Consumer Reports)

The sensors get contaminated with dust, debris, etc. and become unreliable. Should replace Co detectors every 5 yrs and all smoke alarms every 10 yrs. These are not lifetime devices. Cheap Insurance....and it could save your life!

Eh, I'm just getting combined fire alarm / CO detectors. No sense in having these things plugged in all over the house when the simple ceiling install will do.

RegUSPatOff said:   Thorin78 said:   Costco has the 1st alert ones for $22
one review for the First Alert Carbon Monoxide Alarm CO614CP1
at Amazon:
There is, however, one annoying 'feature' with this product. Every once in a while (something like six months), one of the two units may start to 'chirp' and the digital display shows 'bAt'. According to the product manual, that means the backup battery is low and needs to be replaced. At first I followed the instructions and replaced the 9V battery. But after this happened a few times, I got suspicious. So I tested the battery and found it to be still fresh (battery voltage over 9V). I then re-inserted the same battery into the unit, and ran TEST to make sure the unit is functioning correctly. Doing so seems to keep the unit happy for the next six months to a year, but then the 'chirp' returns and I have to repeat this process again.
E
It appears to me that the 'Low Battery' signal is actually triggered by a timer, rather than the actual battery status. Maybe this 'feature' is designed to make sure the user tests the battery at least once a year. But since most average users have no way to check the status of their batteries, they are just going to throw away perfectly good 9V batteries because of this 'feature'.

As to the digital display featured on this product, it turns out to be less useful than I have hoped. The display can only show carbon monoxide concentration in discrete steps such as 0/30/70/150 ppm (parts per million). It does NOT register any level lower than 30 ppm.

but wait,
it seems the Kidde KN-COPP-3
has the same low rating "features"



That is the recommendation by every consumer org
Change to FRESH batteries twice a year. They suggest using daylight savings time to remind you to do so.
Why risk it over an inexpensive battery?

Good deal, thanks for posting



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