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The DOG BONE 8-in-1 Wrench fits 8 SAE socket sizes: 3/8, 7/16, 1/2, 9/16, 5/8, 11/16, 3/4, and 13/16 - inch. Go-Thru swivel head allows easy access and fits any angle. Built in 8-pound magnet serves as an oil drain plug or nut holder. Cr-Mo Steel for strength and durability.
Reg. Price $24.99
SAE

This eight-in-one metric wrench from Dog Bone swivels on either end to offer eight different wrench sizes (12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18 and 19mm)
Metric

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Dog Bone Wrench SAE (8.23kB)
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psxzombie said:   The DOG BONE 8-in-1 Wrench fits 8 SAE socket sizes: 3/8, 7/16, 1/2, 9/16, 5/8, 11/16, 3/4, and 13/16 - inch. Go-Thru swivel head allows easy access and fits any angle. Built in 8-pound magnet serves as an oil drain plug or nut holder. Cr-Mo Steel for strength and durability.
Reg. Price $24.99
SAE

This eight-in-one metric wrench from Dog Bone swivels on either end to offer eight different wrench sizes (12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18 and 19mm)
Metric


What's the difference between the Standard and Metric? Sorry if this is a stupid question. I'm a girl just start to learn about tools.

niniss said:    What's the difference between the Standard and Metric? Sorry if this is a stupid question. I'm a girl just start to learn about tools.

Standard = US sizes in inches (in.)
Metric - Standard for rest of the world in millimeters (mm.)

Some nuts / bolts are in metric and some are standard sizes, so you will need a wrench to match (they are not compatible).

metric is measured in mm and standard is measured in inches.

cnvrtble98 said:   metric is measured in mm and standard is measured in inches.

So that was the only difference, the measurement?! I was thinking of the physical of the instrument itself, thought that they might be shaped or stuctured differently. lol

Thanks for the clarification!

I am completely baffled by the amount of green this post has received. IMO this is one of the worst tools ever created. I am grateful for the friend who gave me one as a gift, but maybe I can help someone from making a purchasing mistake. In the few cases where the large ends are able to fit within the working space, usage has been limited by the long handle length or lack of ratcheting. I suppose one could use it to loosen drain plugs and change oil, but a simple adjustable or open end wrench is much lighter and easier.

IgorSkovoroda said:   I am completely baffled by the amount of green this post has received. IMO this is one of the worst tools ever created. I am grateful for the friend who gave me one as a gift, but maybe I can help someone from making a purchasing mistake. In the few cases where the large ends are able to fit within the working space, usage has be limited by the long handle length or lack of ratcheting. I suppose one could use it to loosen drain plugs and change oil, but a simple adjustable or open end wrench is much lighter and easier.


AGREE with you. It's not such a great tool.

niniss said:   cnvrtble98 said:   metric is measured in mm and standard is measured in inches.

So that was the only difference, the measurement?! I was thinking of the physical of the instrument itself, thought that they might be shaped or stuctured differently. lol

Thanks for the clarification!

While there aren't any structural differences between SAE(Society of Automotive Engineers-standard) and metric, there are some structural differences to be aware of when buying tools. If you look carefully at the "sockets" in the "dog bone" wrench you will see they are "short" and 6-sided. Sockets also come in "deep" and 12-point (12-sided). A 6-sided socket provides more contact area and reduces the likelihood of "rounding the edges" of a nut or bolt-head when tightening or loosening. 12-point sockets come in handy if you have a tight working area with short rotational distances. Similarly, a deep socket may be too long to fit into the space available (and over a nut or bolt-head) and a short socket may be too-short to reach a nut threaded onto a long bolt. (I should mention that there are some other differences, but this should be enough to get you started.)

IgorSkovoroda said:   I am completely baffled by the amount of green this post has received. IMO this is one of the worst tools ever created. I am grateful for the friend who gave me one as a gift, but maybe I can help someone from making a purchasing mistake. In the few cases where the large ends are able to fit within the working space, usage has been limited by the long handle length or lack of ratcheting. I suppose one could use it to loosen drain plugs and change oil, but a simple adjustable or open end wrench is much lighter and easier.

I like this wrench specifically for oil changes. It saves time. looking for the correct size wrench. As far as using an adjustable wrench, i find it can round the edges trying to remove a drain plug that is tight.

I have resisted the temptation many times to buy this and posts above have helped me do that again. I have so many wrenches and sockets-- why would I ever want a product that reduces my need for them?!

IgorSkovoroda said:   niniss said:   cnvrtble98 said:   metric is measured in mm and standard is measured in inches.

So that was the only difference, the measurement?! I was thinking of the physical of the instrument itself, thought that they might be shaped or stuctured differently. lol

Thanks for the clarification!

While there aren't any structural differences between SAE(Society of Automotive Engineers-standard) and metric, there are some structural differences to be aware of when buying tools. If you look carefully at the "sockets" in the "dog bone" wrench you will see they are "short" and 6-sided. Sockets also come in "deep" and 12-point (12-sided). A 6-sided socket provides more contact area and reduces the likelihood of "rounding the edges" of a nut or bolt-head when tightening or loosening. 12-point sockets come in handy if you have a tight working area with short rotational distances. Similarly, a deep socket may be too long to fit into the space available (and over a nut or bolt-head) and a short socket may be too-short to reach a nut threaded onto a long bolt. (I should mention that there are some other differences, but this should be enough to get you started.)


Thanks for the education. I appreciate that!

IgorSkovoroda said:   I am completely baffled by the amount of green this post has received. IMO this is one of the worst tools ever created. I am grateful for the friend who gave me one as a gift, but maybe I can help someone from making a purchasing mistake. In the few cases where the large ends are able to fit within the working space, usage has been limited by the long handle length or lack of ratcheting. I suppose one could use it to loosen drain plugs and change oil, but a simple adjustable or open end wrench is much lighter and easier.

Oil and transmission drain bolts is what I bought it for. Serves this purpose well. With 3 vehicles I don't always remember the head sizes, so I just drag this under the car with me.

niniss said:   
What's the difference between the Standard and Metric? Sorry if this is a stupid question. I'm a girl just start to learn about tools.


Usually where this comes into play is with your vehicle. If you're working on an American make, then bolts and nuts are usually SAE or Standard. If you're working on an Import make, then the bolts and nuts are going to be metric.

kimgkimg said:   niniss said:   
What's the difference between the Standard and Metric? Sorry if this is a stupid question. I'm a girl just start to learn about tools.


Usually where this comes into play is with your vehicle. If you're working on an American make, then bolts and nuts are usually SAE or Standard. If you're working on an Import make, then the bolts and nuts are going to be metric.


It makes sense. Don't work on cars so i guess i don't need this one. I think some open mouth/adjustable wrench will suit better for around the house.

This tool is crap. You will never see a real mechanic use a wrench like this because it is CRAP!

delzy said:   This tool is crap. You will never see a real mechanic use a wrench like this because it is CRAP!
Please correct me if I'm wrong, Delzy, but what I think your trying to say is that a professional mechanic needs dependable tools that are more aligned with specific tasks. Pro brands like Mac and Snap-On are made with better alloys to optimize strength and weight. They are also built to closer tolerances so they can transfer loads more evenly and are less likely to deform under load, break, corrode, or otherwise change dimensions. Other time-saving advantages include available accessories, marking, indexing, and ease of cleaning. (I've been generalizing here, and some mechanics might take exception regarding impact-sockets.)

if you really need one, get it at Harbor Freight for $9.99

SAE
Thorsen - Item#65498

metric
Pittsburgh - Item#65497

It's still a waste of money.

but use a 20% off HF coupon and it's almost worth it to get it for 8 bucks.



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