• Page :
  • 1
  • Text Only
Voting History
rated:

Lodge Logic Preseasoned Cast-Iron Professional 12" Square Grill Pan
Disclaimer
http://1saleaday.com/flash/p12sgr3/

Condition: New
Packaging: Brown Box
Warranty: Original Manufacturer
Manufacturer: Lodge
Model: P12SGR3

Features Include:
12 square cast-iron grill pan
Long handle and helper handle for extra stability
Handle has a hole in the center for hanging
The raised ridges allow fat to drain
Cast iron retains heat superbly and evenly
Made of preseasoned cast-iron
Hand wash only
Cleans easily with hot water and stiff brush
Oven safe to 500 F
Dimensions: 11.5 x 10.5 x 1.8

1Sale.com
See 1Sale.com discounts that earn 1.5% FatWallet Cash Back.
Member Summary
Staff Summary
Thanks for visiting FatWallet.com. Join for free to remove this ad.

They also have the 10" by 20" reversible grill/griddle for 30

machineheadg2r said:   They also have the 10" by 20" reversible grill/griddle for 30

Link

They are selling this through Newegg.com for $27.99 - free shipping.

what does everyone use to reduce splatter with these type of skillets? I love how they cook, just usually a big mess afterwards

Back in the 90's, stores used to sell a very close woven wire mesh screen, usually with a plastic handle. It was available in a fairly large size to cover the splatter of multi-sized skillets. They worked pretty well and weren't bad to clean.

buxtong said:   Back in the 90's, stores used to sell a very close woven wire mesh screen, usually with a plastic handle. It was available in a fairly large size to cover the splatter of multi-sized skillets. They worked pretty well and weren't bad to clean.

They still sell these at kitchen supply stores. I have a set and just through them in the dishwasher when they need to be cleaned.

rootbear said:   buxtong said:   Back in the 90's, stores used to sell a very close woven wire mesh screen, usually with a plastic handle. It was available in a fairly large size to cover the splatter of multi-sized skillets. They worked pretty well and weren't bad to clean.

They still sell these at kitchen supply stores. I have a set and just through them in the dishwasher when they need to be cleaned.


Handwashing is reccommended

archena said:   rootbear said:   buxtong said:   Back in the 90's, stores used to sell a very close woven wire mesh screen, usually with a plastic handle. It was available in a fairly large size to cover the splatter of multi-sized skillets. They worked pretty well and weren't bad to clean.

They still sell these at kitchen supply stores. I have a set and just through them in the dishwasher when they need to be cleaned.


Handwashing is reccommended


Sorry, not the frying pan. I meant the mesh splatter screens are what I throw in the dishwasher. I have never put any of my pans in a dishwasher.

archena said:   rootbear said:   buxtong said:   Back in the 90's, stores used to sell a very close woven wire mesh screen, usually with a plastic handle. It was available in a fairly large size to cover the splatter of multi-sized skillets. They worked pretty well and weren't bad to clean.

They still sell these at kitchen supply stores. I have a set and just through them in the dishwasher when they need to be cleaned.


Handwashing is reccommended


Handwashing the wire mesh is a pain in the you-know-what. Dishwasher is just fine.

Lowest according to camel $27.34

psxzombie said:   Lowest according to camel $27.34

So is this not supposed to be a better deal than at $25 shipped?

all the other Lodge items have already sold out this morning

  • Toadster said:   what does everyone use to reduce splatter with these type of skillets?buxtong said:   Back in the 90's, stores used to sell a very close woven wire mesh screen, usually with a plastic handle. It was available in a fairly large size to cover the splatter of multi-sized skillets. They worked pretty well and weren't bad to clean.The mesh 'Splatter Shields' were available as a set of 2 (i.e. different sizes) for ~$10 @ WalMart last time I walked down the 'Kitchen Utensils' aisle. Possibly Target too...

  • Toadster said:   ...I love how they cook, just usually a big mess afterwards I bought one years ago for burgers but compared to my Forman Grill, which itself is kind of a PITA to clean, the Lodge is worse. You have to FLIP what you're cooking, TEMPORARILY removing the shield and splattering at least some grease that you have to clean from the stove, clean both the pan and the shield and the pan is HEAVY to hold. I've reverted back to my Forman Grill - just be sure to clean it RIGHT AFTER cooking, while it's still hot and the boiling water from the soaked paper towel easily dislodges the grease and burnt food particles.

TakeTheActive said:   
  • Toadster said:   what does everyone use to reduce splatter with these type of skillets?buxtong said:   Back in the 90's, stores used to sell a very close woven wire mesh screen, usually with a plastic handle. It was available in a fairly large size to cover the splatter of multi-sized skillets. They worked pretty well and weren't bad to clean.The mesh 'Splatter Shields' were available as a set of 2 (i.e. different sizes) for ~$10 @ WalMart last time I walked down the 'Kitchen Utensils' aisle. Possibly Target too...

  • Toadster said:   ...I love how they cook, just usually a big mess afterwards I bought one years ago for burgers but compared to my Forman Grill, which itself is kind of a PITA to clean, the Lodge is worse. You have to FLIP what you're cooking, TEMPORARILY removing the shield and splattering at least some grease that you have to clean from the stove, clean both the pan and the shield and the pan is HEAVY to hold. I've reverted back to my Forman Grill - just be sure to clean it RIGHT AFTER cooking, while it's still hot and the boiling water from the soaked paper towel easily dislodges the grease and burnt food particles.




I agree with you for when it comes to burgers being better in a GF but I like these Lodge raised ridge grill pans better for steaks and chicken breast.

The obvious question: What are these seasoned with?

thebigo said:   The obvious question: What are these seasoned with?

Cooking oil (most likely vegetable). Cast iron is uneven and has voids/pores. It is coated with oil and then baked which smooths out the surface and creates a somewhat non-sticking surface. Don't wash them with soap or you will remove the oil/grease that keeps the cast iron sealed. I have been cooking a lot with cast iron in my son's Boy Scout troop and we simply use salt and a damp cloth to wipe them clean. The salt acts as an abrasive to scrape the crud off but leaves the coating on. On our campout last weekend I told one of the scouts to simply grab a chunk of hardened snow/ice and use that (same effect with abrasive ice crystals).

We have always just put some water in the pan and let it cook for a bit - drain the water - wipe down with a towel. It does not require that much work. Just make sure it is dry when done.


Look it up and you will see an overwhelming majority of people do this and have had their pans around for 20-30 years with no issues. No use fighting it scrubbing too much - after boiling it with water you can wipe and be done.



Disclaimer: By providing links to other sites, FatWallet.com does not guarantee, approve or endorse the information or products available at these sites, nor does a link indicate any association with or endorsement by the linked site to FatWallet.com.

Thanks for visiting FatWallet.com. Join for free to remove this ad.

TRUSTe online privacy certification

While FatWallet makes every effort to post correct information, offers are subject to change without notice.
Some exclusions may apply based upon merchant policies.
© 1999-2014

It's time for an upgrade!

After a decade on our current platform, we're upgrading our plumbing. The site will be down for a few hours starting at 1:30AM CST tonight.

At FatWallet we strive to bring you the best coupons, deals and Cash Back. So please come back and check us out.