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One of the better LED bulb on the market.
http://www.bestbuy.com/site/Insignia%26%23153%3B---800-Lumen%2C-...
Reg. Price: $17.99
Sale: $12.99 Shipped

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^ the question was why LED bulb has huge heat sinks. And many replied saying it work best at low temperature. There is... (more)

WorkerAnt (May. 09, 2013 @ 4:02p) |

I can get about 25 CF's for this price, use 18w. YOu can get CFs in various temperatures.

LED someday, if the price gets... (more)

handyguy (May. 09, 2013 @ 4:18p) |

DEAD now

matrikab (May. 19, 2013 @ 2:57p) |

Staff Summary

Seems to be a bad link. Try this.

I bought 2 of these last week. Really like the light that they give off and the immediate on when you hit the switch.

If these use 13W, just curious why people would buy them when you can get two dimmable CFL's of the same wattage for this price? Because of lifespan?

These are 800 lumen, which at $13 is a good price. The Utilitech 7.5W (40W) 450 lumen at Lowes is $10. I have them and wish they were brighter. So am interested in the Insignia. And then being able to dim them when 800 lumens isn't needed would be nice. But, what color temperature are these? The Utilitech 7.5W are 3000K and are a decent enough white color, and I wouldn't want it any more blue.
Oddly, another Utilitech 7.5W (40W) is only 490 lumen and is 5000K (blue), yet is $15. Also odd, there's a Utilitech 13.5W (60 W) 800 lumen 3000K "Decorative" bulb for $20, but another one that's not "Decorative" but with the same specs is $25.

Also the Insignia bulb has two heatsinks up the whole side of the bulb. The Utilitech bulbs have a heatsink around the entire 1/3 of the bottom. Wonder which puts out a better light pattern? The Insignia would allow more light to shine down, but will you see the blocked light from the heatsinks on the side?
I always heard LED's put out a lot less heat than other types. If even incandesent bulbs don't need heatsinks, why do LED's need such huge heatsinks?

I won't put CFL in my house because of the UV, plus they just aren't as efficient.

wantonsoup said:   I won't put CFL in my house because of the UV, plus they just aren't as efficient.

Tell me more about the UV.

Edit: I was going to purchase a couple of these to try out, but it won't let me select shipping. Kind of pointless for them to shout "Free Shipping" on the item page, when they won't even ship the item.

I would use these because I don't want CFLs in my house. None of them are instant-on, regardless of what anyone claims.

I hate the color from the CFLs. I want to try LEDs. Is it harsh? Thanks.


I still think they are to expensive except for perhaps a special application.
I can wait a few years till the pricing gets better.

notnow said:   I still think they are to expensive except for perhaps a special application.
I can wait a few years till the pricing gets better.


Agree on the price.

But u should at least get one for the bathroom. The 1 min pee is too short for CFL to turn full brightness, while these LED has a full bright almost instantly.

Both LED and CFL are about the same electrical efficiency, both have different, but approximately equal environmental impact. LED light is closer to incandescent light. LEDs start instantly and do not have warm-up periods. LEDs will likely come down in price for two reasons: 1) manufacturing scale, as more are produced and more competitors enter the market, and more government inducements are added, they will cost less to make, and 2) LED efficiency is not at its peak. New LED diodes are being developed all the time, with better brightness and color.

LEDs do also have additional advantages which are somewhat in evidence in some bulbs. They have the ability to change color or even have multiple colors or light effects, to respond to programming directly, to incorporate logic and sensors, etc... While many LEDs now only dim a small percent (100-->75%) like CFLs, CFLs will likely never be fully dimmable, while some LEDs are already fully dimmable (100-->0%). LEDs also have the ability to have directed light, take different non-standard shapes (i.e. a lampshade that is actually the light, a flat plate light, flexible rope lights, etc...

Price is not a really a reason to purchase LEDs when compared to CFLs, even considering the entire lifespan of the bulb, they will likely get replaced in several years for different reasons. But for the investment, it provides better light, more durability, and the same efficiency.

Slickone said:   
I always heard LED's put out a lot less heat than other types. If even incandesent bulbs don't need heatsinks, why do LED's need such huge heatsinks?


LEDs work best at low temperature, theoretically if not practically, they are most efficient at 8 degrees above absolute zero. As their temperature increases, their light output drops. Also, the temperatures that a high wattage LED might encounter in an enclosure without a heat sink may permanently damage them.

Incandescent lights have to be very hot to work at all. The filaments operate at around 3000 degrees Celsius. It makes little difference if the glass vacuum enclosure is 50, 100 or 500 degrees so long as it doesn't melt or the metal base and conductors don't corrode or melt.

VirtuaL said:   wantonsoup said:   I won't put CFL in my house because of the UV, plus they just aren't as efficient.

Tell me more about the UV.



Here's some more about UV.

ssdanywaz said:   LEDs work best at low temperature because they are small in they size and spread the it can work in small quantity.

That is why they all have such significant incorporated heat-fins. It is not because they get hot, but because they will lose lifespan if they are allowed to get hot.

One thing I'm still sussing out, however is the actual electricity usage of LEDs and CFLs when dimmed. I've read some things that are ambiguous about whether the lowering of the dimmer actually reduces the wattage sent to the bulb or just signals the bulb to produce less light. Anyone who knows better on this, I would be glad to be educated on that part of the bulb efficiency.

wantonsoup said:   I won't put CFL in my house because of the UV, plus they just aren't as efficient.They've also been known to leak coolant.

LED generally does not seem to be financially better than CFL right now. It has been improving steadily and significantly, that may not be the case in a few years. But LED use no mercury, CFL has a little and requires special disposal. CFL is still better than incandescent in this regard, because they use so much less energy that there's less mercury produced by power plants. LED do promise significantly longer lives than CFL, and so far in my experience they are much better. I've got about 100 LED bulbs installed. Three were bad right out of the box, and easy returns at Costco and Lowe's. Otherwise, no failures yet. If they do reach the advertised life, they probably are a better deal than CFL right now. I've got some rated for 45 years at 3 hours a day! For me, the big functional advantage for LED is the fast lighting up to full strength (I do have a few that show a brief pause). I also had a bunch of MR60 halogen spot bulbs, and those are so small there will probably never be CFL models. They're also great for outdoor lights. They work well in cold - CFL seem especially bad and slow to get to full power there.

But mostly I've geeked out and certainly gone beyond rational spending in converting every bulb I can to LED.

These look like pretty good bulbs. I've seen cheaper, but always for less light and the cheapest are usually not dimmable (a combination that is fine for some uses).

So the heatsinks are so the LED can be overdriven and not burn out, so they normally don't put out enough light?

I don't know about lighting dimmers or LED's but with RC airplane linear ESC's (electronic speed controls), when you reduce the throttle, the ESC pulses the signal to the motor, and the ESC runs hotter because it has to dissipate the extra current that would have been sent to the motor. Switching ESC's don't have that problem.
So I wonder if LED dimmers work this way. And as someone asked above, when dimming LED's, are they still using the same wattage?
I've noticed some flashlights when run in lower power mode, are just pulsing the LED.

I'm always amazed at the people that complain about CFL's not being full brightness when turned on. Personally, that's a plus in my book. Who in the world needs 100% light instantly? It starts out at probably 75%(?) anyway and only takes a few seconds to fully brighten up, and personally I like the "feature" so my eyes can get used to light before it's fully bright (the cats like the feature too, LOL). This is especially great in the bathroom after waking up!

Also, my CFL's put out much warmer light than any LED A19 that I've seen. Even my 3000K LED is very white (and slightly blue), so my room looks like a giant reef tank.

I thought about buying one of these Insignia bulbs just for one room where I need more light, but the more I think about it, even at $13, it's not worth it yet. The only reason I got the 7.5W Utilitech LED bulbs is I used coupons a year or two ago and they ended up $2. And I have about ten of the 4-packs of CFL's from Home Depot that were $.01 each last year.

Slickone said:   So the heatsinks are so the LED can be overdriven and not burn out, so they normally don't put out enough light?

I don't know about lighting dimmers or LED's but with RC airplane linear ESC's (electronic speed controls), when you reduce the throttle, the ESC pulses the signal to the motor, and the ESC runs hotter because it has to dissipate the extra current that would have been sent to the motor. Switching ESC's don't have that problem.
So I wonder if LED dimmers work this way. And as someone asked above, when dimming LED's, are they still using the same wattage?
I've noticed some flashlights when run in lower power mode, are just pulsing the LED.


ESCs don't dissipate the extra power that would have been sent to the motor. Pulsing ESCs ARE switching ESCs and they both interrupt the current frequently to approximate an output power which would be produced by putting in a lower continuous current.

The excess heat is because in the moment the ESC is switching, the ESC is dissipating a lot of power. But before and after that moment (more like 1ms) it isn't dissipating much power.

What I'm trying to say is that with ESCs you really are using less power because when it is off, the circuit is interrupted and so no power is dissipated. Only for the moment it is switching is there power lost in the ESC.

The same is true of LED bulbs. They really do use less power when dimming. Much less. If they didn't they would overheat (among other things).

Slickone said:   I always heard LED's put out a lot less heat than other types. If even incandesent bulbs don't need heatsinks, why do LED's need such huge heatsinks?
Because physics. Consider that the emission efficiency of a heatsink increases proportionally with temperature (for an ideal blackbody, it is proportional to the fourth power). The consequences is that the hotter you run your heatsink, the smaller it has to be to dump a given power load; incandescents can be thought of as a devices that run their "heatsink" (a tiny filament of metal) at thousands of degrees F.

Human psychology says LED heatsinks are huge, therefore they must be hot. In fact, they are huge because they do cannot be allowed to be hot (200F would already be hot enough to seriously reduce an LED's life expectancy).

Everyone is a genius. Sure... LED doesn't produce heat, here is a recall on LED.

http://www.cpsc.gov/en/Recalls/2013/LED-Light-Bulbs-Recalled-by-...

Hazard: The bulbs can overheat during use, posing a fire hazard.

Has anyone here suggested that LEDs do not produce heat? I don't see it, but maybe it's only apparent to an actual genius.

^ the question was why LED bulb has huge heat sinks. And many replied saying it work best at low temperature. There is "low temp" and there is "room temp" and than there is "too much heat that it can burn itself out so it need a heat sink to bring back closer to room temp".

Work best at low temperature is not the same as to avoid burn out.

BTW, be an actual genius all you want I just want to set things right.

Slickone said:   If these use 13W, just curious why people would buy them when you can get two dimmable CFL's of the same wattage for this price? Because of lifespan?



I can get about 25 CF's for this price, use 18w. YOu can get CFs in various temperatures.

LED someday, if the price gets better.

DEAD now



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