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Pioneer SP-BS22-LR bookshelf speakers are on sale again, at both A.mazon and Best.Buy.

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B008NCD2LG/ref=ox_sc_imb_mini_d... 
and
http://www.bestbuy.com/site/4-bookshelf-speakers-pair/5086955.p?... 

All the reviews are extremely positive. Here's two:

http://www.stereophile.com/content/pioneer-sp-bs22-lr-loudspeake... 
http://www.audiocircle.com/index.php?topic=113182.0 

Several reviewers claim these sound better than some $1000 speakers. Anyone looking for a really cheap pair of bookshelf speakers should very seriously consider these.

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Pioneer SP-BS22-LR (12.93kB)
Thanks BMWLVR82
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Most Recent Posts
This piece of info may be very useful to you:  Written by Jim Salk, a very respected name in speaker design - To article... (more)

jumbi555 (Oct. 18, 2013 @ 9:54a) |

Thanks so much jumbi555 for taking the time to quote from Salk's article. Anyone who knows anything about good speakers ... (more)

cga (Oct. 18, 2013 @ 10:07a) |

Feel free to back up your posts with some evidence or information, as others have already done.  If it is just "elementa... (more)

khail19 (Oct. 18, 2013 @ 11:43p) |

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Just ordered them but from Amazon (to avoid the sales tax)

Great deal. I have the SP-BS21s which are less powerful. Got the pair from WalMart for $78 before tax (free ship to store). I'm very happy with the purchase, and am using the pair with a subwoofer for my home theater room (1080p Epson projector) onto drywall. Very cost-effective setup.

http://mobile.walmart.com/m/phoenix;jsessionid=9C11DDDF9B391E9D841014268522E781#ip/24311964

Sensitivity: 85dB and not magnetically shielded --> kills the deal for me.

Thanks OP—green for you. Please add "bookshelf" to the title.

borges said:   Sensitivity: 85dB and not magnetically shielded --> kills the deal for me.
  Could you please share why it's good to have these things?  Thanks.

FishHeads said:   
borges said:   Sensitivity: 85dB and not magnetically shielded --> kills the deal for me.
  Could you please share why it's good to have these things?  Thanks.

  
In general, the higher the sensitivity of the speakers the less power required to drive them, and the louder they will play. A high sensitivity is not always, or even that often, associated with quality speakers. My experience has been that speakers in the 85dB to 88dB sensitivity range are ideal. Now, if you're running a low wattage tube amplifier with only a few watts output, a speaker with high sensitivity is necessary. Not magnetically shielded merely means they can't be placed too close to the TV or the magnets will interfere with the TV image. A 50w/channel  amplifier/receiver will drive these Pioneer speakers very nicely. 

cga said:   
FishHeads said:   
borges said:   Sensitivity: 85dB and not magnetically shielded --> kills the deal for me.
  Could you please share why it's good to have these things?  Thanks.

  
In general, the higher the sensitivity of the speakers the less power required to drive them, and the louder they will play. A high sensitivity is not always, or even that often, associated with quality speakers. My experience has been that speakers in the 85dB to 88dB sensitivity range are ideal. Now, if you're running a low wattage tube amplifier with only a few watts output, a speaker with high sensitivity is necessary. Not magnetically shielded merely means they can't be placed too close to the TV or the magnets will interfere with the TV image. A 50w/channel  amplifier/receiver will drive these Pioneer speakers very nicely. 

  I assume you're talking about interference on tube TV's or analog signals, right?  Is there actual interference on flatscreen TV's with digital inputs?

>>>
 I assume you're talking about interference on tube TV's or analog signals, right?  Is there actual interference on flatscreen TV's with digital inputs?
<<<

I'm not really sure. But from experience, unless the unshielded speaker is large placing it six inches away from the TV (any TV) should suffice. However, if it's a large unshielded multi-driver speaker I'd say eighteen inches would be advisable.

cga said:   >>>
 I assume you're talking about interference on tube TV's or analog signals, right?  Is there actual interference on flatscreen TV's with digital inputs?
<<<

I'm not really sure. But from experience, unless the unshielded speaker is large placing it six inches away from the TV (any TV) should suffice. However, if it's a large unshielded multi-driver speaker I'd say eighteen inches would be advisable.

  
Seems right to me.

RE flatscreen effects:  I would not expect any issues at all.  I've placed LCD flat screens on the edge of the 5 Gauss line of an NMR/MRI magnetic field with no issue, where ray tubes would distort like nobody's business.

Always wanted to install a back to the future sized driver in one of those babies...pretty sure it wouldn't have blown...just perforate an eardrum or two...thumpity thump!

cga said:   
FishHeads said:   
borges said:   Sensitivity: 85dB and not magnetically shielded --> kills the deal for me.
  Could you please share why it's good to have these things?  Thanks.

  
In general, the higher the sensitivity of the speakers the less power required to drive them, and the louder they will play. A high sensitivity is not always, or even that often, associated with quality speakers. My experience has been that speakers in the 85dB to 88dB sensitivity range are ideal. Now, if you're running a low wattage tube amplifier with only a few watts output, a speaker with high sensitivity is necessary. Not magnetically shielded merely means they can't be placed too close to the TV or the magnets will interfere with the TV image. A 50w/channel  amplifier/receiver will drive these Pioneer speakers very nicely. 
 

 maybe 85dB to 88dB is ideal for you, however all high end  speakers have much higher sensitivity.

borges said:   
cga said:   
FishHeads said:   
borges said:   Sensitivity: 85dB and not magnetically shielded --> kills the deal for me.
  Could you please share why it's good to have these things?  Thanks.

  
In general, the higher the sensitivity of the speakers the less power required to drive them, and the louder they will play. A high sensitivity is not always, or even that often, associated with quality speakers. My experience has been that speakers in the 85dB to 88dB sensitivity range are ideal. Now, if you're running a low wattage tube amplifier with only a few watts output, a speaker with high sensitivity is necessary. Not magnetically shielded merely means they can't be placed too close to the TV or the magnets will interfere with the TV image. A 50w/channel  amplifier/receiver will drive these Pioneer speakers very nicely. 

 maybe 85dB to 88dB is ideal for you, however all high end  speakers have much higher sensitivity.

Wow. That's just flat out wrong. There are so many examples I'm not even going to bother listing any.

 

  

cga said:   
borges said:   
cga said:   
FishHeads said:   
borges said:   Sensitivity: 85dB and not magnetically shielded --> kills the deal for me.
  Could you please share why it's good to have these things?  Thanks.

  
In general, the higher the sensitivity of the speakers the less power required to drive them, and the louder they will play. A high sensitivity is not always, or even that often, associated with quality speakers. My experience has been that speakers in the 85dB to 88dB sensitivity range are ideal. Now, if you're running a low wattage tube amplifier with only a few watts output, a speaker with high sensitivity is necessary. Not magnetically shielded merely means they can't be placed too close to the TV or the magnets will interfere with the TV image. A 50w/channel  amplifier/receiver will drive these Pioneer speakers very nicely. 

 maybe 85dB to 88dB is ideal for you, however all high end  speakers have much higher sensitivity.

Wow. That's just flat out wrong. There are so many examples I'm not even going to bother listing any.

 

  

  go ahead, prove it.

Magneplanar 1.7. There's hundreds more. Look up the specs yourself.

cga said:   Magneplanar 1.7. There's hundreds more. Look up the specs yourself.
is it a "high end"?
pathetic, they charge mostly for a chick look not for a sound
it is against a law of physics to create a high-end sound from front panel membrane... go ahead and name .... BOSE as a high end...
and.. here they call them  "budget"   ---> http://news.cnet.com/2300-13645_3-10016793-7.html

Mission M64I. That's another one. I could go on to list a hundred more, but I fear I'm cluttering up the thread with off topic posts. 

borges said:   
cga said:   Magneplanar 1.7. There's hundreds more. Look up the specs yourself.
is it a "high end"?
pathetic, they charge mostly for a chick look not for a sound
it is against a law of physics to create a high-end sound from front panel membrane... go ahead and name .... BOSE as a high end...
and.. here they call them  "budget"   ---> http://news.cnet.com/2300-13645_3-10016793-7.html

 

  TThe Mag 1.7 are $2k pair and are on most everyone's list of best speakers in the $2k range. I'm currently on my Ipad and can't link, otherwise I'd point to  reviews .

And then there's the Vandersteen Model 3A Signature speakers, a very high end speaker, indeed. 

I apologize for continuing to prove my point that there are TONS of very expensive speakers with not particularly high efficiency (sensitivity) specs. I could go on and on with many more examples, but I'll stop.

Sensitivity and quality of speakers have no direct correlation. Many high end speakers are not very sensitive, because they don't need to be. Most consumers looking to spend a lot of money on speakers already have high wattage amps to power them. Not many people spend thousands of dollars on speakers and try to push them with a low powered HTIB (home theater in a box) receiver.

khail19 said:   Sensitivity and quality of speakers have no direct correlation. Many high end speakers are not very sensitive, because they don't need to be. Most consumers looking to spend a lot of money on speakers already have high wattage amps to power them. Not many people spend thousands of dollars on speakers and try to push them with a low powered HTIB (home theater in a box) receiver.
  wrong answer, it is not true.There is direct correlation with this parameter among others.

The speakers in the ///M3 are high sensitivity and they're awesome. The crown vic, however, has low sensitivity speakers and they're crappy.

correlation != causation

</trolling>

As noted by the OP:  from Stereophile.com: "Every audiophile—even well-heeled investment bankers—should listen to the Pioneer SP-BS22-LR, to hear what's possible for the fiscally challenged music lover."

Also: from Soundandvision.com:"Once again, Andrew Jones has delivered a gift to the surround audiophile on a budget."

The AbsoluteSound states: "I would never have guessed at the outset that I’d be taking the BS22 so seriously when it came time to write this review, but in the right room this game little compact has in many areas turned in a performance worthy of speakers well beyond its almost laughably low price point...The BS22 is simply one of the great buys out there, without reservation."

From Steve Guttenburg at CNET: "In its price class, nothing can touch these speakers"

I would trust these reviews over someone quibbling about sensitivity!  Heading to BB today!

Of course, people who do not understand elementary physics do trust to reviews by others, who want to add a vapor into the process and create some sort of art to proof that they are irreplaceable, hence justifying own existence.

Hi,

Is the $89.99 for the pair or for one unit?

Thanks,
gard

gard said:   Hi,

Is the $89.99 for the pair or for one unit?

Thanks,
gard

  

it's for the pair.

borges said:   Of course, people who do not understand elementary physics do trust to reviews by others, who want to add a vapor into the process and create some sort of art to proof that they are irreplaceable, hence justifying own existence.
  This piece of info may be very useful to you:  Written by Jim Salk, a very respected name in speaker design - To article  

" If you find yourself obsessed about sensitivity, here are some things to consider.

  • The ability of any system to produce exceptional sound will be limited mainly by the capability of the speakers
  • Today’s highly-accurate, cutting-edge drivers tend to be low sensitivity
  • If you want a speaker using these cutting-edge drivers, it will tend to be a low sensitivity design
  • Watts are cheap – high power amps are readily available ..."

It's not just a matter of "grasping elementary physics" - such as the efficiency in converting power to sound waves.

Thanks so much jumbi555 for taking the time to quote from Salk's article. Anyone who knows anything about good speakers understands that efficiency (sensitivity) has nothing to do with quality. Actually, as the article implies, perhaps the opposite is true, namely that the really good speakers are not that efficient, for various reasons.

It probably won't make a difference to you know who, however.

I have a policy of almost never greening or redding posts in threads that I start. Otherwise, I'd give you a big green. And would have given several others greens or reds.

Thanks again, jumbi555.

borges said:   
khail19 said:   Sensitivity and quality of speakers have no direct correlation. Many high end speakers are not very sensitive, because they don't need to be. Most consumers looking to spend a lot of money on speakers already have high wattage amps to power them. Not many people spend thousands of dollars on speakers and try to push them with a low powered HTIB (home theater in a box) receiver.
  wrong answer, it is not true.There is direct correlation with this parameter among others.

 
Feel free to back up your posts with some evidence or information, as others have already done.  If it is just "elementary physics" I'm sure I can wrap my little brain around the concept.  Or just keep trolling, making cryptic posts, and getting red.  Sensitivity has no bearing on the quality of sound that speaker produces (entirely a subjective matter anyways.)  While the brain does perceive a louder speaker as sounding better, it is nothing other than a difference in volume.  The same effect can be had by turning up the volume a bit on these lower sensitivity Pioneers.  Unless you are playing them at levels high enough to induce distortion, of course.



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