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1 oz Silver Buffalo Round 999 Fine Lot of 10 SKU 74758 | eBay
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silver
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Alternatively, Apmex is selling 1 oz. Sunshine Silver rounds (.999 silver) for $21.79 any quantity (or $22.44 w/ credit ... (more)

Plissken (Mar. 11, 2014 @ 5:18p) |

I look at it as being worse than that because you are at best going to get spot less 5% when you try to sell it.
  This r... (more)

fatgempler (Mar. 12, 2014 @ 12:21a) |

Typically the cost of these and similar coins is spot price + a fixed dollar amount (not percent) so that part doesn't f... (more)

Plissken (Mar. 12, 2014 @ 5:48a) |

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Good deal. Hate that they tax NY because that kills it.

Why do people buy these?
 

Just guessing, diversification and owning/collecting physical/tangible item?

They're a safe investment, safer than the stock market.

Mrbyte said:   They're a safe investment, safer than the stock market.
  That's a pretty broad statement to make.

They're also one of the few investments that actually increases in value when the economy gets worse.


Historical Silver Prices and Price Chart - InvestmentMine
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What great info here.  Silver is a commodity - and NO it is not safer then the stock market.  Check the last 10 year, surge from $5 to $45 and now about $20.  So volatile indeed

http://www.infomine.com/investment/metal-prices/silver/all/

 

Mrbyte said:   They're also one of the few investments that actually increases in value when the economy gets worse.
  That isn't necessarily true.

not really....silver will never go bankrupt and be worth nothing

not really....silver will never go bankrupt and be worth nothing

ALSO, targeted emails (I got one) to certain customers give 10% eBay bucks back on purchases over $200. Convenient because this isn't too much over that amount. That with the 1% FW CB, and CC rewards.

** edit: NO eBay bucks on bullion. **

nitesbane said:   ALSO, targeted emails (I got one) to certain customers give 10% eBay bucks back on purchases over $200. Convenient because this isn't too much over that amount. That with the 1% FW CB, and CC rewards.
 

~~Qualifying purchases exclude all items in the following categories:
Classifieds, Business & Industrial, Real Estate, eBay Gift Cards (within the Gift Cards & Coupons category), Bullion (within the Coins & Paper category), and eBay Motors

Mrbyte said:   They're a safe investment, safer than the stock market.
  Yea, and when silver plummeted from $40+/oz they were saying that too...

Totally missed the "no coin bullion" clause; nice catch, Doug.

nitesbane said:   Totally missed the "no coin bullion" clause; nice catch, Doug.

  I wonder if CashBack makes a distinction between bullion and coins?
[L=http://www.providentmetals.com/knowledge-center/bullion-vs-numis... said: http://www.providentmetals.com/knowledge-center/bullion-vs-numismatic-coins.html]Bullion[/L] vs. Numismatic Coins
A common question from novice investors of gold and silver is what in the heck is the difference between a bullion and a numismatic coin?

Unfortunately, unscrupulous precious metals dealers may exploit this “ignorance” to steer customers in the wrong direction – forcing them to spend more money for lower quantity. (We’ll revisit this fact in a bit).

First, let’s address the fundamental difference between bullion and numismatic coins.

Let’s begin with bullion coins. Well, they are gold and silver coins purchased for one of three reasons: investment, inflation hedge or survival.

Much of the time, all three purposes factor into the decision to invest in bullion coins.

A bullion coin’s weight is expressed as an even amount, such as 1-ounce, 1/2-ounce or even grams (for gold and silver bars).

With only a few exceptions, bullion coins are manufactured year-to-year and are purchased primarily as an investment.

Examples of bullion coins include:

U.S. Gold Eagles

Canadian Gold Maples

U.S. Silver Eagles

Canadian Silver Maples

South African Krugerrands

90% Junk Silver (pre-1965 half-dollars, quarters, dimes, etc...)

(Although 90% junk silver quarters are no longer produced, their value is strictly based on the coin’s silver content and not its condition.)

On the flip side, Numismatic coins are considered collectible and are not produced in modern times. These coins are are primarily valued for their rarity and not as much for their actual metal content.

In fact, Numismatic coins are generally worth more than their metal content. Incredibly rare and purchased mainly by collectors, they’re not an investment in the typical sense.

Examples of numismatic coins include:

Pre-1933 $20, $10 Eagle coins

Peace Silver Dollars

Swiss 20 Francs

British Sovereigns


 

 
227.98 / 10 = 22.28 per ounce,  current spot price is 20.83 per ounce.

So, the markup is almost 7%

 

If one was to go resell these eventually, do they typically demand any premium over spot?

robster said:   
 
227.98 / 10 = 22.28 per ounce,  current spot price is 20.83 per ounce.

So, the markup is almost 7%

 

 Check your math.  227.98 / 10 = 22.80, so the markup is 9.45% at your spot price

robster said:   
 
227.98 / 10 = 22.28 per ounce,  current spot price is 20.83 per ounce.

So, the markup is almost 7%

 

  
It is unlikely that you can buy at spot prices.  It is analogous to "wholesale" in terms of the average consumer.  So, yes... they've marked it up (as all businesses do).  The issue is at what the price you can buy THESE, is relative to the price you can buy someone else's comparable product.

How much can one sell that for after buying? and where/how -- someone from actual selling experience would add value....

Do not see answers 

invisible said:   How much can one sell that for after buying? and where/how -- someone from actual selling experience would add value....

Do not see answers 

  
I have some actual experience, though I'm certainly no coin dealer.  In general, there is zero money to be made by "flipping" something like this.  You buy ABOVE spot, you sell BELOW spot... so unless silver jumps dramatically, you lose in the short run.  One exception I have found is the eBay game.  IF you position your product right, and IF the stars align, eBay bidders will overbid (as they often tend to do).  However, even then, after nearly 15% combined FVF/Paypal fees, you've got to get some pretty hefty bids to make any money.  

/2 cents

 

invisible said:   How much can one sell that for after buying? and where/how -- someone from actual selling experience would add value....

Do not see answers 

  
It depends on a lot of things. Mainly if the price of silver goes up or down after you buy it. I don't think you're going to get the answer you want.

labboypro said:   
invisible said:   How much can one sell that for after buying? and where/how -- someone from actual selling experience would add value....

Do not see answers 

  
I have some actual experience, though I'm certainly no coin dealer.  In general, there is zero money to be made by "flipping" something like this.  You buy ABOVE spot, you sell BELOW spot... so unless silver jumps dramatically, you lose in the short run.  One exception I have found is the eBay game.  IF you position your product right, and IF the stars align, eBay bidders will overbid (as they often tend to do).  However, even then, after nearly 15% combined FVF/Paypal fees, you've got to get some pretty hefty bids to make any money.  

/2 cents

 

  
And IF the buyer doesn't claim you sent them an empty package.

This is not a good deal. The coins quality could range drastically. Since the vendor currently offers these on their website, I'd guess these are low quality coins.

bateany said:   This is not a good deal. The coins quality could range drastically. Since the vendor currently offers these on their website, I'd guess these are low quality coins.
  Not sure what you mean.  You are buying these for the ounce of silver, not for the collectability.  I'd be willing to bet they are pretty shiny.

bateany said:   This is not a good deal. The coins quality could range drastically. Since the vendor currently offers these on their website, I'd guess these are low quality coins.
  While I completely agree this is not a good deal, what is your basis on the quality aspect?  And why would it even matter at long as the silver is the correct weight and fineness.  

If people are interested in silver they would do better buying actual sterling silver pieces (flatware etc) on eBay.  Once you know what you are looking for it isn't too difficult to find items that sell for below spot.  Just set up a sniping program and bid a set percentage below spot based on the weight.  You would be surprise the number of auctions you can win.  Just remember to factor in shipping.  And it is more impressive to guests to have a house filled with silver pieces, than a sock drawer filled with coins.

bateany said:   This is not a good deal. The coins quality could range drastically. Since the vendor currently offers these on their website, I'd guess these are low quality coins.
  
These aren't actually coins. it is bullion in the design of a coin. Instead of a silver bar this is circular and has the design of the old Buffalo nickels. Pretty much the standard is paying ~5% over spot. If you think silver will go up you buy and hold. If the economy ever does crash, precious metals will be one form of a new currency system or used to barter with.

Not a bad deal but I'm not a fan of bullion. I would much rather buy silver as "junk" silver. (us coins that were in circulation pre 1964)

lionheart4life said:   Good deal. Hate that they tax NY because that kills it.
  I thought silver and gold are not taxable? Or only the dollar coins that are not?

LiquidSilver said:   
If people are interested in silver they would do better buying actual sterling silver pieces (flatware etc) on eBay.  

  
Agreed, but people seem to overbid on this stuff.  Perhaps they think "sterling silver" = AG??  Or maybe they just really want someone else's silverware for their own.

Alternatively, Apmex is selling 1 oz. Sunshine Silver rounds (.999 silver) for $21.79 any quantity (or $22.44 w/ credit card payment) + $9.95 shipping.
Total price for $10 would be $227.85, but (excluding credit card perks) the deal is a little sweeter per oz.  if you plan on getting more than 10 considering the flat shipping and lower initial cost per oz.
extreme example... ~$22.00 each if you ordered 70 of them...

APMEX LINK 

DONT FLAME ME if you dont like my deal because you pay more for using a credit card... im just giving people another option.

Note:  These are tied to real time silver price, so they will fluctuate until you lock an order in.
Update --> Ends 3/12 at midnight (ET)

jammintomusic said:   
robster said:   
 
227.98 / 10 = 22.28 per ounce,  current spot price is 20.83 per ounce.

So, the markup is almost 7%

 

 Check your math.  227.98 / 10 = 22.80, so the markup is 9.45% at your spot price

  I look at it as being worse than that because you are at best going to get spot less 5% when you try to sell it.
  This represents a big up front cost to buying as you instantly loose a big percentage of your money in the hopes of future gains.  At least with the stock market you usually get to watch your investment dwindle in value over time

Typically the cost of these and similar coins is spot price + a fixed dollar amount (not percent) so that part doesn't fluctuate with the spot price (but will fluctuate from market demand). 
(Example, it is spot + $x.xx... not spot + x%)
There definitely is practical value to owning a coin over a solid bar (it is in smaller, recognizable increments for trading/etc) but there is actual market value as well.
You will retain the "per round over spot price" markup value when you go to resell.
Perfect example:  Current spot price bid: $20.84; ask: $20.94
Apmex will buy back American Silver Eagles for: $23.06 and selling them for $23.95 (at bulk price)



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