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gatzdon said: Sending a notice via Certified Mail with NO return receipt will document that the
notice arrives at the specified address while leaving the recipient no option
to ignore or reject the notice.
Certified Mail always requires a signature. When you request a return receipt, the post office sends you a copy of the signature. If you don't request it, then they just keep the signature on file.

munkyxtc said: You could also (at the expense of more postage due to a larger box) locate a box for a LCD TV* seal it back up and mail that to him.

*Replace with box of any high priced item.


Way back when I worked for a company that used that tactic frequently and almost always effectively. Made for great surveillance video footage, too.

Gotta love the magical power of greed.

gatzdon said: If I'm not mistaken, the lease should contain a specified LEGAL address for the landlord.

If mailing to that address, why would one need a return receipt? I always
assumed that Return Receipt was needed when you needed to prove that a
specific individual received the envelope. When you have an address specified
for legal service, either via contract or registered with the state, then in
theory you should only have to prove that the mailing made it to that address.

Sending a notice via Certified Mail with NO return receipt will document that the
notice arrives at the specified address while leaving the recipient no option
to ignore or reject the notice.

Can someone correct me if I'm wrong in my logic?



The Certified mail receipt stamped by the post office is your proof of mailing. The return receipt comes into play if you are serving court papers as the return receipt ends up being proof of service. Two separate issues.

Our leases have an address listed for both parties and you each agree to accept items mailed certified as good service.
Any notice which either party may or is required to give, shall be in writing and may be given by mailing the same, by certified mail, and shall be deemed sufficiently served upon Tenant if and when deposited in the mail addressed to the leased premises, or addressed to Tenantís last known post office address, or hand delivered, or placed in Tenantís mailbox to Tenant at the premises. If Tenant is more than one person, then notice to one shall be sufficient as notice to all. The Landlord, any person managing the premises and anyone designated by the Landlord as agent are authorized to accept service of process and receive other notices and demands, which may be delivered to:

The Landlord, xxxxxxxx or xxxxxxxx, at the following address:

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
Telephone: xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

BEEFjerKAY said: munkyxtc said: You could also (at the expense of more postage due to a larger box) locate a box for a LCD TV* seal it back up and mail that to him.

*Replace with box of any high priced item.


Way back when I worked for a company that used that tactic frequently and almost always effectively. Made for great surveillance video footage, too.

Gotta love the magical power of greed.


Sending a heavy item to someone on disability, and then videotape watching them easily lift the item?

slappycakes said: Nothing that you can do to ensure that someone does something in the future (and court won't help at this stage because the landlord hasn't (not) done anything yet), but a recommendation:

1. Whenever you send a cert letter, send a non cert copy in a separate envelope. Some people, as a rule, NEVER accept certified mail (even though it doesn't matter that they didn't accept it, only that you sent it), some people assume what it is and don't bother going to the Post Office to pick it up, etc. A non cert copy gives them the chance to read it w/out them having to actually accept the cert mail. Extra cost - @ 50 cents.

2. Call the landlord up and confirm with him what you are expecting and see if there are any disagreements.


This is good advice. I don't normally accept certified letters unless I am expecting them. Send along a normal notice so it can at least possibly be addressed. Although as a landlord it seems like it should accept them, or maybe because he is a landlord he does not accept them.

Anyways, I would again agree with this advice.

SUCKISSTAPLES said: yep, 100x more likely to sign for it, especially if think theyre getting an online purchase/eBay item

You rarely get "bad news" in a padded paypal envelope , unlike a certified letter... it catches people off guard


I have to mark this down for future reference. It is a good idea.

Update:

It's June 22 - 22 days after the lease ended, and still no security deposit.

I called him today and he said to call back tomorrow afternoon. He has used this line EVERY time I have tried to call him about anything. When I call him tomorrow, I'm betting he won't answer, or tell me to call back. Etc Etc.

What are my options?

SUCKISSTAPLES said: Besides certified, you can send Priority or First Class Mail with Delivery Confirmation, as well as UPS or Fedex...all will give you documented proof of delivery and do not require a signature.

Many people refuse certified letters since they are NEVER good news


You can start by simply sending an email and requesting confirmation of receipt from the recipient. If that doesn't work, you can follow up with the above.

vnuts21 said: Update:

It's June 22 - 22 days after the lease ended, and still no security deposit.

I called him today and he said to call back tomorrow afternoon. He has used this line EVERY time I have tried to call him about anything. When I call him tomorrow, I'm betting he won't answer, or tell me to call back. Etc Etc.

What are my options?


Take him to small claims! He probably doesn't have the money and is waiting for the next tenant's SD to pay you!

vnuts21 said: Update:

It's June 22 - 22 days after the lease ended, and still no security deposit.

I called him today and he said to call back tomorrow afternoon. He has used this line EVERY time I have tried to call him about anything. When I call him tomorrow, I'm betting he won't answer, or tell me to call back. Etc Etc.

What are my options?


Go directly to Small Claims Court. Sue for double the security deposit plus court costs. Do not pass Go, hopefully collect more than $200.

RI Security Deposit Legal Guide



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