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Fellow fatwalleters,

Your insight has been very helpful in the past, so I thought I'd probe you all for any advice you might have on contractor payouts. The situation at hand is as follows:

1) General Contractor hired to do roof replacement, masonary work, and some interior touchup
2) Roofing subcontractor didn't cover roof before major storm
3) ~$55,000 of damages occured to the property, of which insurance has issued a check to myself
4) I have received a lien notice from masons who completed work but weren't paid by the G.C.-lien will be placed on July 14th [The general contractor has paid out $0 of my 50% up front payment to the sub)
5) General Contractor has issued lien waiver forms to myself for all subcontractors and himself


The question I have for you all is legally can I pay the subcontractors the amount shown on their lien waiver forms, or do all payments have to go through the general contractor of which I have a signed contract with? For example for my masonry work, my contract amount is $6,000. The lien waivers show $1,000 to G.C. and $5,000 to mason. Rather then paying the G.C. $6,000 lump and risking no sub payout can I pay with two checks to each party? Could I still be liable for total contracted amount?

He wants the insurance payout for his subs paid to him in lump sum, my concern is if he doesn't distribute the funds I believe I'm still liable. Any insight anyone can share would be fantastic as I've never dealt with Mechanics Liens before, or such a shady contractor for that matter. Thanks!

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Did I miss something here or do you have an alleged 'lien waiver' from the masons in question?

I personally know of an instance where a GC forged the signatures of SCs on the waivers.

When it comes time to spend that $55k, I know what GC I wouldn't be hiring...

I see you've edited to add that the GC wants the insurance money to go to him to repair the damage that was due to his failure to monitor his subcontractor. You haven't already contracted with him for this work, have you?

If you have subs threatening to lien your home for previous work, that's a pretty strong signal that you don't want to deal with the GC in the future.

1. Absolutely, yes you can pay the subs or suppliers direct. I would just be confident of the amount that is actually owed to them. But if he's given you lien waivers for the subs or suppliers already, then they should have already been paid (since the subs or suppliers would have signed those waivers themselves).

2. Another, less desirable option would be payment with a joint check (a check made payable to the supplier/sub AND the contractor for the amount owed to the supplier/sub.

3. I hope that the insurance company making the payment isn't yours, and is actually the insurance held by the GC or sub.

4. Have you asked the GC why you are getting lien notices? If they are really about to file them (and not just sending a 1st notice), then the GC should be VERY aware of the problem.

5. I wouldn't pay the GC anything else until you confirm what happened to your 50% down (I'm guessing he used it to pay his prior project bills) and I would get a referral for a good local attorney (maybe someone who's skill is contracts/collections/construction law, etc.).

Thanks for the link Germanpope. I'm going to have to give it a solid re-read tonight as some of the legal jargin was a little over my head.

Taxman,

The general contractor sent me a packet of lien waivers from both himself and his subs. There was one from the mason, but there was no signature on the form. I've requested a signed copy over the weekend. The letter from the mason is an intention to file lien notice.

I have the money to pay out, and we agree on the final settlement amount, the issue is I don't trust the contractor to forward the payments. How do I cover my butt? One thought I had was writing the check to general contractor, but putting the subs signatures on the check so they have to co-sign as well. Any thoughts?


-Sean

taxmantoo said: I see you've edited to add that the GC wants the insurance money to go to him to repair the damage that was due to his failure to monitor his subcontractor. You haven't already contracted with him for this work, have you?

If you have subs threatening to lien your home for previous work, that's a pretty strong signal that you don't want to deal with the GC in the future.


Agreed. I will NEVER work with this GC again. After the roof leak the contractor wanted to "make everything right for me". I didn't contract the repairs through him, as much as he just started doing work and submitted an invoice to the insurance. He started immediate repairs. $10K of the insurance money I've received is to go to him to disperse to some of the subs he had to bring back in to fix the damages.

Why would you pay a GC 50% upfront? They don't pay the subs anything until the subs perform the work. My guess is you deposit paid of the subs on the job before yours.

Are the lien waivers final - meaning they waive all lien rights subject to payment of a specified amount?

I would work with the subs to find out what they would find acceptable, a joint pay check may be your best bet - but to be on the safe side I would arrange a meeting with the GC and the subs where the GC endorses it in front of you and hands it over.

slappycakes said: 1. Absolutely, yes you can pay the subs or suppliers direct. I would just be confident of the amount that is actually owed to them. But if he's given you lien waivers for the subs or suppliers already, then they should have already been paid (since the subs or suppliers would have signed those waivers themselves).

-That's good news to hear.

2. Another, less desirable option would be payment with a joint check (a check made payable to the supplier/sub AND the contractor for the amount owed to the supplier/sub.

-I have really been thinking about the joint check option. What would the downsides be to this other then the inconvience to the G.C. & Subs?

3. I hope that the insurance company making the payment isn't yours, and is actually the insurance held by the GC or sub.

-Definitely there insurance. Although I took over an $8,000 depreciation hit on the claim through there provider! Part of me wonders whether I should have paid my deductible, taken the rate increase, and maybe come out ahead.

4. Have you asked the GC why you are getting lien notices? If they are really about to file them (and not just sending a 1st notice), then the GC should be VERY aware of the problem.

-The GC said he spoke to the mason and told him not to place the lien. He did it behind his back. I kind of think they are just protecting there legal rights. If a lien is filed, per contract, no payout is made until liens are lifted... so he'd be screwing himself I think.

5. I wouldn't pay the GC anything else until you confirm what happened to your 50% down (I'm guessing he used it to pay his prior project bills) and I would get a referral for a good local attorney (maybe someone who's skill is contracts/collections/construction law, etc.).


-I think this is a good idea. Any suggestions on what type of "proof" I could ask for? Should I go as far as asking for a photocopied check receipt?


Thanks for the input!

BrlDsguise said: Why would you pay a GC 50% upfront? They don't pay the subs anything until the subs perform the work. My guess is you deposit paid of the subs on the job before yours.

-The 50% payout up front was required by the bank. The loan is an FHA streamline, and it's required in the bank contract.

Are the lien waivers final - meaning they waive all lien rights subject to payment of a specified amount?

-I believe so... The document is titled Final Waiver of Lien and has a contractor's affidavit on the bottom half of the page. It's stamped with an official seal, although tough to make out actual signatures.

I would work with the subs to find out what they would find acceptable, a joint pay check may be your best bet - but to be on the safe side I would arrange a meeting with the GC and the subs where the GC endorses it in front of you and hands it over.


-This is a great idea. I like having the GC endorse it infront of me. For all I know this guy might just forge the subs name and cash it himself.

llcwannabe said: taxmantoo said: I see you've edited to add that the GC wants the insurance money to go to him to repair the damage that was due to his failure to monitor his subcontractor. You haven't already contracted with him for this work, have you?

If you have subs threatening to lien your home for previous work, that's a pretty strong signal that you don't want to deal with the GC in the future.


Agreed. I will NEVER work with this GC again. After the roof leak the contractor wanted to "make everything right for me". I didn't contract the repairs through him, as much as he just started doing work and submitted an invoice to the insurance. He started immediate repairs. $10K of the insurance money I've received is to go to him to disperse to some of the subs he had to bring back in to fix the damages.


This sounds like a really bad situation. He just started doing work without a contract? Get rid of this guy. Tell him the work for which he submitted an invoice to the insurance co. was not authorized and to get lost. Get somebody who knows what they are doing.

Modern said:
This sounds like a really bad situation. He just started doing work without a contract? Get rid of this guy. Tell him the work for which he submitted an invoice to the insurance co. was not authorized and to get lost. Get somebody who knows what they are doing.


I'm thinking 1/2 hr free consult with an attorney to consider Modern's proposal and review other ramifications of this mess.

llcwannabe said: slappycakes said: 1. Absolutely, yes you can pay the subs or suppliers direct. I would just be confident of the amount that is actually owed to them. But if he's given you lien waivers for the subs or suppliers already, then they should have already been paid (since the subs or suppliers would have signed those waivers themselves).

-That's good news to hear.

2. Another, less desirable option would be payment with a joint check (a check made payable to the supplier/sub AND the contractor for the amount owed to the supplier/sub.

-I have really been thinking about the joint check option. What would the downsides be to this other then the inconvience to the G.C. & Subs?

3. I hope that the insurance company making the payment isn't yours, and is actually the insurance held by the GC or sub.

-Definitely there insurance. Although I took over an $8,000 depreciation hit on the claim through there provider! Part of me wonders whether I should have paid my deductible, taken the rate increase, and maybe come out ahead.

4. Have you asked the GC why you are getting lien notices? If they are really about to file them (and not just sending a 1st notice), then the GC should be VERY aware of the problem.

-The GC said he spoke to the mason and told him not to place the lien. He did it behind his back. I kind of think they are just protecting there legal rights. If a lien is filed, per contract, no payout is made until liens are lifted... so he'd be screwing himself I think.

5. I wouldn't pay the GC anything else until you confirm what happened to your 50% down (I'm guessing he used it to pay his prior project bills) and I would get a referral for a good local attorney (maybe someone who's skill is contracts/collections/construction law, etc.).


-I think this is a good idea. Any suggestions on what type of "proof" I could ask for? Should I go as far as asking for a photocopied check receipt?


Thanks for the input!


My responses to your questions:

#2 The biggest downside (aside from the hassle to those receiving the check) are #1 who do you give it to? If you give it to the GC, maybe he just runs it through his bank and the bank never catchs it; #2 It can be hard to get a bank to exchange a joint check for a cashier's check (important if you are looking to get this resolved ASAP and the sub/supplier wants guaranteed funds). The supplier/sub will give you a copy of your invoice for your job and a paid receipt - they are worried about getting paid and WILL work with you - nobody wants to file liens (or even notices of intent), they are expensive, a hassle, and not a guarantee of payment.

#3 Regarding the insurance payment... I would think that you should be kept whole on any issues, regardless of depreciation. Once again, this is an attorney area.

#4 You are correct, the mason has legally required deadlines that he must follow, otherwise that lien is worthless. Your GC sounds like he spent your 50% money down on paying off another project and you need to hope that he gets another project after yours so that he can get yours paid off. Although this is more common than it should be, it doesn't sound good, and I'd be concerned if I were you.

#5 Yes, any proof would be nice.

The summary of my thoughts:

This sort of thing (GC not paying the sub or suppliers) is VERY common, they are often a project behind in cash flow and they use the next project to pay off the last one. It is kind of like a ponzi scheme - but as long as you are NOT their last customer, it will often be resolved, but with a bunch of work. However, you are in a spot where you could get royally shafted if the GC decides to jump ship. I hope you have a reputable guy.

TIP - talk to whoever deals with CREDIT/AR at this mason or other sub/supplier, explain your situation and ask them how long and what kind of experience they have with this GC - ideally they should know that you are thinking of paying them directly.

If it were me, I would NOT PAY ANYONE, ANYTHING ELSE until I took out some "insurance" by meeting with an attorney or someone knowledgeable in these types of situations (maybe another GC that you trust).

Fellas,

Thank you for all the fantastic input. Quick update. Things escalated quite a bit this evening with the General Contractor. I had what started as a civil conversation about wrapping up the final payment arrangements. I mentioned that I would like to have the ability to payout the subs for the amount shown on their final lien waivers directly, due to some concerns of previous payment not being forwarded.

The contractor flipped out. They claim that the Final Lien Waivers are the end all of liability, and no further actions could come against me if I pay them. (From what people mentioned here, and what I've read elsewhere I believe I still own some risk even with the Waiver right?) He claimed if I paid his subs directly I would be breaching my contract with him and would still owe him the original amount contracted for. I spoke to each subcontractor before hand, all are obviously for my plan and furious at the G.C. for mudding up the process.

I offered direct checks to subs, GC/sub co-signed checks, a face to face meeting of subs and GC to exchange certified checks, all options denied with no good explanation. After talking in circles for about an hour I reiterated that my final offer was to pay everyone directly, the G.C. included, the amounts shown on the liens waiver and if this wasn't reasonable to contact me tomorrow in writing and we can move on to arbitration as listed in our contractor agreement.

I hope I didn't push things to far, but it seems there is no middle ground for the GC. As you all mentioned my only leverage is the money I have and once dispersed leverage is lost.

Anyone have any experience with arbitration? Am I insane for even considering this as an option to move forward with? Looks like it might be time to hunt around for an attorney. I wish Angie's List had attorneys. For anyone bored or interested, I've been running a little blog with pictures and excerpts from this "fun" adventure. Feel free to check it out, I'll have to give Fatwallet a shoot out on my next writeup. Thanks fellas, and ladies...

http://strippeddown2flat.blogspot.com

Then don't pay him a dime. I think the GC's original plan was to ding the subs by part of the money. Let him come after you. It is not that hard to defend against a frivolous lien. I have a friend who did it by himself but you probably need a lawyer if it comes to that.

I'd at least consult an attorney experienced in construction contracts and get some advice prior to arbitration. There's a lot of money involved, the GC seems overly contentious/defensive, and he probably has far more experience than you in these situations. Just because he says you will have no liability gives you no protection if he's wrong. His over-reaction to everything - even compromises such as co-signed checks - is a red flag, and sure makes it look like there's potential dishonesty ahead. By the way, did you get references or check reviews from other customers to see if the GC had issues/complaints on previous jobs?

llcwannabe said: Fellas,

Thank you for all the fantastic input. Quick update. Things escalated quite a bit this evening with the General Contractor. I had what started as a civil conversation about wrapping up the final payment arrangements. I mentioned that I would like to have the ability to payout the subs for the amount shown on their final lien waivers directly, due to some concerns of previous payment not being forwarded.

The contractor flipped out. They claim that the Final Lien Waivers are the end all of liability, and no further actions could come against me if I pay them. (From what people mentioned here, and what I've read elsewhere I believe I still own some risk even with the Waiver right?) He claimed if I paid his subs directly I would be breaching my contract with him and would still owe him the original amount contracted for. I spoke to each subcontractor before hand, all are obviously for my plan and furious at the G.C. for mudding up the process.

I offered direct checks to subs, GC/sub co-signed checks, a face to face meeting of subs and GC to exchange certified checks, all options denied with no good explanation. After talking in circles for about an hour I reiterated that my final offer was to pay everyone directly, the G.C. included, the amounts shown on the liens waiver and if this wasn't reasonable to contact me tomorrow in writing and we can move on to arbitration as listed in our contractor agreement.

I hope I didn't push things to far, but it seems there is no middle ground for the GC. As you all mentioned my only leverage is the money I have and once dispersed leverage is lost.

Anyone have any experience with arbitration? Am I insane for even considering this as an option to move forward with? Looks like it might be time to hunt around for an attorney. I wish Angie's List had attorneys. For anyone bored or interested, I've been running a little blog with pictures and excerpts from this "fun" adventure. Feel free to check it out, I'll have to give Fatwallet a shoot out on my next writeup. Thanks fellas, and ladies...

http://strippeddown2flat.blogspot.com


There are different types on lien waivers - conditional and unconditional. Conditional lien waivers state that the contractor or subcontractor waives their lien rights in consideration of payment of a certain sum or money or invoice - so obviously a subs conditional waiver is worthless if the GC never pays them. There are also partial and final lien waivers - partial waiver liens for a partial invoice invoice or through a certain period of time and final lien waivers weigh all lien rights. So the only waiver that completely protect you from a sub lien would be an unconditional final waiver.

Out of curiousity does the GCs lien waiver make any acknowledgement they have paid the subs? If so and they have not it would be a false document.

I think you are doing the right thing, legally the fact that you have knowledge there is a payment problem will in some states give you more of a duty to insure the subs are paid (in some states you can be on the hook for paying the subs even if you paid the GC, other states do not have this type of double jeopardy but may if you pay the GC with knowledge the subs have not been paid).

At this point I would agree you probably need an attorney to step in. The GC could file his own lien or as farfetched as it may sound claim you are interfering in his business by contacting the subs.

Edit: Typo

Revike said: I'd at least consult an attorney experienced in construction contracts and get some advice prior to arbitration. There's a lot of money involved, the GC seems overly contentious/defensive, and he probably has far more experience than you in these situations. Just because he says you will have no liability gives you no protection if he's wrong. His over-reaction to everything - even compromises such as co-signed checks - is a red flag, and sure makes it look like there's potential dishonesty ahead. By the way, did you get references or check reviews from other customers to see if the GC had issues/complaints on previous jobs?


I agree completely. Something smells fishy. In the process of searching for the right attorney to council here in Chicago. Any ballpark idea of what arbitration costs could run? Trying to do some opportunity cost evaluations here in my head. $1,000 - $5,000 - $10,000 - $20,000? I've never hired legal council and have no clue what to expect. I have one who has ask for me to give him a call to "chat", but mentioned he is not a construction specialist. Do I need to mention right off that bat, that the initial discussion is not billable time?

As for the references, yes... This is a classic nightmare example. Called his references, went to several building locations around town to see first hand work, he has a nice office in the City, was very polite and seemed like a great guy to do the work. I've learned that I will never hire another contractor that isn't on Angie's List. All my angie's contractors have been FANTASTIC- they're actually held accountable for screwing customers.

Brl-

You brought up an excellent point! I just reviewed one of the initial Final Waiver of Lien forms signed by the GC. He shows a total contract price to mason of $5,050, "amount paid" of $3,575, "this payment" $1,475, and "balance due" $0. The document is signed and notorized. The actual Lien Waiver coming directly from the Mason shows $0 paid (Contradicts). I found the masons phone number and called to confirmed the mason has received $0. From your description the GC's initial Final Waiver sounds like a false legal document correct? What kind of implications does this have or mean?



BrlDsguise said: llcwannabe said: Fellas,

Thank you for all the fantastic input. Quick update. Things escalated quite a bit this evening with the General Contractor. I had what started as a civil conversation about wrapping up the final payment arrangements. I mentioned that I would like to have the ability to payout the subs for the amount shown on their final lien waivers directly, due to some concerns of previous payment not being forwarded.

The contractor flipped out. They claim that the Final Lien Waivers are the end all of liability, and no further actions could come against me if I pay them. (From what people mentioned here, and what I've read elsewhere I believe I still own some risk even with the Waiver right?) He claimed if I paid his subs directly I would be breaching my contract with him and would still owe him the original amount contracted for. I spoke to each subcontractor before hand, all are obviously for my plan and furious at the G.C. for mudding up the process.

I offered direct checks to subs, GC/sub co-signed checks, a face to face meeting of subs and GC to exchange certified checks, all options denied with no good explanation. After talking in circles for about an hour I reiterated that my final offer was to pay everyone directly, the G.C. included, the amounts shown on the liens waiver and if this wasn't reasonable to contact me tomorrow in writing and we can move on to arbitration as listed in our contractor agreement.

I hope I didn't push things to far, but it seems there is no middle ground for the GC. As you all mentioned my only leverage is the money I have and once dispersed leverage is lost.

Anyone have any experience with arbitration? Am I insane for even considering this as an option to move forward with? Looks like it might be time to hunt around for an attorney. I wish Angie's List had attorneys. For anyone bored or interested, I've been running a little blog with pictures and excerpts from this "fun" adventure. Feel free to check it out, I'll have to give Fatwallet a shoot out on my next writeup. Thanks fellas, and ladies...

http://strippeddown2flat.blogspot.com


There are different types on lien waivers - conditional and unconditional. Conditional lien waivers state that the contractor or subcontractor waives their lien rights in consideration of payment of a certain sum or money or invoice - so obviously a subs conditional waiver is worthless if the GC never pays them. There are also partial and final lien waivers - partial waiver liens for a partial invoice invoice or through a certain period of time and final lien waivers weigh all lien rights. So the only waiver that completely protect you from a sub lien would be an unconditional final waiver.

Out of curiousity does the GCs lien waiver make any acknowledgement they have paid the subs? If so and they have not it would be a false document.

I think you are doing the right thing, legally the fact that you have knowledge there is a payment problem will in some states give you more of a duty to insure the subs are paid (in some states you can be on the hook for paying the subs even if you paid the GC, other states do not have this type of double jeopardy but may if you pay the GC with knowledge the subs have not been paid).

At this point I would agree you probably need an attorney to step in. The GC could file his own lien or as farfetched as it may sound claim you are interfering in his business by contacting the subs.

Edit: Typo

This lien waiver was signed by the GC but not by the mason?

The purpose of this document is for the mason to waive his right to take an ownership interest in your property.
1. If he hasn't signed it, the 'waiver' doesn't waive anything.
2. If somebody other than him signed it claiming to be him, that would be fraud.

taxmantoo said: This lien waiver was signed by the GC but not by the mason?

The purpose of this document is for the mason to waive his right to take an ownership interest in your property.
1. If he hasn't signed it, the 'waiver' doesn't waive anything.
2. If somebody other than him signed it claiming to be him, that would be fraud.


Agreed - not sure what form of waiver would have the GC signing for the mason. A typical final waiver would have the mason signing with the contract price, amount paid to date and balance (although I have seen GC affadavits where they state what they have paid subs and usually require the subs waiver to be attached as backup). The important thing at this point is you have conflicting data on who has been paid what so be very clear with the GC and sub that there has to be agreement between both of them on what has been paid and more importantly what is still owed before you will be in a position to make any payments.

Yes, the second half of the page is a GC affidavit. So the way it was submitted was:

GC Final Waiver Form Signed by GC(Umbrella like?)for 1K+5K+10K=16K:
affidavit lists-
Sub A-1K
Sub B-5K
Sub C-10K

Sub A Final Waiver Form Signed by Sub for 1K


Sub B Final Waiver Form Signed by Sub for 5K


Sub C Final Waiver Form Signed by Sub for 10K

The way the papers were sent it makes it seem as though I still owe him the money directly, or he maintains the right to lien my property.


BrlDsguise said: taxmantoo said: This lien waiver was signed by the GC but not by the mason?

The purpose of this document is for the mason to waive his right to take an ownership interest in your property.
1. If he hasn't signed it, the 'waiver' doesn't waive anything.
2. If somebody other than him signed it claiming to be him, that would be fraud.


Agreed - not sure what form of waiver would have the GC signing for the mason. A typical final waiver would have the mason signing with the contract price, amount paid to date and balance (although I have seen GC affadavits where they state what they have paid subs and usually require the subs waiver to be attached as backup). The important thing at this point is you have conflicting data on who has been paid what so be very clear with the GC and sub that there has to be agreement between both of them on what has been paid and more importantly what is still owed before you will be in a position to make any payments.

llcwannabe said: Yes, the second half of the page is a GC affidavit. So the way it was submitted was:

GC Final Waiver Form Signed by GC(Umbrella like?)for 1K+5K+10K=16K:
affidavit lists-
Sub A-1K
Sub B-5K
Sub C-10K

Sub A Final Waiver Form Signed by Sub for 1K


Sub B Final Waiver Form Signed by Sub for 5K


Sub C Final Waiver Form Signed by Sub for 10K


So, you have a waiver 'signed' by Sub B, and a letter from Sub B threatening the act which the waiver has already waived, because he still wants his $5k? When you talked to Sub B, did he claim that signature was not his? (where I'm going with this is a few years ago a GC in my county built a house, forged all the subs' signatures on the waivers, and sold the house without paying the subs. Sometimes insolvent contractors do the strangest things)

Taxman,

I called the mason, Sub B, he said he was in the office yesterday and did sign the paperwork.

Maybe I'm being to anal? Here is the weird part to me. I have all these waivers, but haven't submitted final payment. So essentially they have waived their right to file a lien, without receiving a payment yet? I'm an honest man and will certainly pay out the money owed, but what if the person never receives money. Does the Final Waiver become void?



taxmantoo said: llcwannabe said: Yes, the second half of the page is a GC affidavit. So the way it was submitted was:

GC Final Waiver Form Signed by GC(Umbrella like?)for 1K+5K+10K=16K:
affidavit lists-
Sub A-1K
Sub B-5K
Sub C-10K

Sub A Final Waiver Form Signed by Sub for 1K


Sub B Final Waiver Form Signed by Sub for 5K


Sub C Final Waiver Form Signed by Sub for 10K


So, you have a waiver 'signed' by Sub B, and a letter from Sub B threatening the act which the waiver has already waived, because he still wants his $5k? When you talked to Sub B, did he claim that signature was not his? (where I'm going with this is a few years ago a GC in my county built a house, forged all the subs' signatures on the waivers, and sold the house without paying the subs. Sometimes insolvent contractors do the strangest things)

llcwannabe said: Taxman,

I called the mason, Sub B, he said he was in the office yesterday and did sign the paperwork.

Maybe I'm being to anal? Here is the weird part to me. I have all these waivers, but haven't submitted final payment. So essentially they have waived their right to file a lien, without receiving a payment yet? I'm an honest man and will certainly pay out the money owed, but what if the person never receives money. Does the Final Waiver become void?


Go back to my post on the different types of waivers - I will bet the final waivers are conditional on them receiving the payment (look for the words "in consideration" on them). That is the industry norm - I give you a waiver and it is effective when I receive payment.

Hi Mate

I think you can legally pay them individually instead of paying lump sum to the General Contractor.There would be a legal problem if the General contractor does not pay to mason and subcontrators.There is no need to pay thorough through General Contractor.


conveyancing quotes

My response is not directly related to this thread but reading this thread I have a few questions regarding an additional bathroom we had put. I had a contractor come and do work for me and things were all good and I even paid him $450 more since he went over 2 days and he was supposed to come back and do finish work but he wont return my calls and stuff. The work left is not major but still would require different skill trade workers to finish such as Fixing the new walls, small leaks in water lines as well as the vent pipes in the roof, trim and molding work. I have tried calling him numerous times but to no avail.

1) People mentioned checking for contractor reviews; where and is there a site to do this?
2) I know everyone mentions the pain of suing a contractor but I really want to look into this especially since I helped the contractor quite a bit during the process and really thought that we were on good terms.
3) Should I file a BBB complaint or would have give him a chance to do other things?

Thanks,

Shahhere

shahhere said: My response is not directly related to this thread but reading this thread I have a few questions regarding an additional bathroom we had put. I had a contractor come and do work for me and things were all good and I even paid him $450 more since he went over 2 days and he was supposed to come back and do finish work but he wont return my calls and stuff. The work left is not major but still would require different skill trade workers to finish such as Fixing the new walls, small leaks in water lines as well as the vent pipes in the roof, trim and molding work. I have tried calling him numerous times but to no avail.

1) People mentioned checking for contractor reviews; where and is there a site to do this?
2) I know everyone mentions the pain of suing a contractor but I really want to look into this especially since I helped the contractor quite a bit during the process and really thought that we were on good terms.
3) Should I file a BBB complaint or would have give him a chance to do other things?

Thanks,

Shahhere


You're a day late and oh, about $450 dollars short. You never pay a contractor anywhere near in full until the job is done. You pay upfront for materials and that's ONLY if they are delivered on site. Labor gets paid at the end.



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