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I'm opening a new bank account with Bank A; and currently have a checking account with Bank B. If I write a check made out to myself under Bank B, can Bank A deposit these funds into my new account with them?

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I do that frequently. Usually when I need to get money (for whatever reason) in a form other than a stack of twenties.

thok (May. 06, 2011 @ 4:16p) |

Yes. But consider what happened to me when I did this in January. I made a check out to myself from Bank B and took it... (more)

fedguy (May. 06, 2011 @ 5:17p) |

You need to ask the bank you are opening the new account with. Some let you write a check to your name, others want the ... (more)

alilley (May. 06, 2011 @ 7:00p) |

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Yes.

Am I the only one wondering WTF is up with these questions

xchange55 said:   I'm opening a new bank account with Bank A; and currently have a checking account with Bank B. If I write a check made out to myself under Bank B, can Bank A deposit these funds into my new account with them?Really? We've devolved to "Can I deposit my money into my own account?"

I've never had to deal with this particular circumstance and just wanted to be sure. If that makes me an idiot in your eyes than so be it. I would hope you have better things to do with your time such as posting helpful responses than ridicule others.

xchange55 said:   I've never had to deal with this particular circumstance and just wanted to be sure. If that makes me an idiot in your eyes than so be it. I would hope you have better things to do with your time such as posting helpful responses than ridicule others.
Why don't you ask your own bank instead of a bunch of strangers on an internet site?

If ridicule bothers you, I would suggest posting such questions in the flame-free thread.
In fact I would suggest doing that anyway.

xchange55 said:   I'm opening a new bank account with Bank A; and currently have a checking account with Bank B. If I write a check made out to myself under Bank B, can Bank A deposit these funds into my new account with them?

A friend of mine did this exact thing a few years ago. Before he even left the bank premises, heavily armed agents from the Department of Homeland Security wrestled him to the ground and threw him in the back of an unmarked black van. He was soon sent to an unspecified location in Eastern Europe, where he was waterboarded and forced to listen to Eminem's "Slim Shady" album 24 hours a day. After that he spent some hard time shackled to an eye bolt in the floor of a Guantanamo cell, sometimes being forced to stand for 30 hours at a time. It was in Gitmo that he developed a close friendship with a Justin Bieber bobblehead, a friendship he maintains to this day.

When he was finally released, he was just an empty shell of a human. I tried to help him get back on his feet but it's a lost cause. He just wanders around downtown streets with Justin, barking "take your stinking paws off me, you damn dirty ape!" to every person he meets.

xchange55 said:   I'm opening a new bank account with Bank A; and currently have a checking account with Bank B. If I write a check made out to myself under Bank B, can Bank A deposit these funds into my new account with them?

Better safe than sorry....
Call Bank A and ask: Am I allowed to give myself my own money or can I only give it to other people?
Call Bank B and ask: Can I deposit money I already own or does it need to be someone elses money?

Once you are able to get them to understand that yes, you really are asking such a question, you shall have your answer.

<deleted>

Yes.

I do it. To withdraw reimbursement money from my Health Savings Account I write a check and deposit it at my local credit union. (Not necessarily a true bank-to-bank situation, but more/less the same).

Bear in mind they could put a 'hold' on your deposit for a few days. Especially if Bank B is out of town.


Is your name Cash?

I think we've run out of different ways to say "yes," but at least the answer has been made clear.

Yes. Because my bank knows me I can write up to $1,000 and get immediate access to my just-deposited check funds from my other bank.

I have a couple of older family members who will write a check to THEMSELVES, then cash it at the bank that they have the account at. I've asked them why they just don't fill out a withdrawal slip (No,they do not use the ATM). They either say this method is easier, or just do not understand that you can withdraw money from a checking acct.

Is this behavior rooted in the way banks operated before I became an adult (the 80s)? Are my relatives just daft?

harlock001 said:   I have a couple of older family members who will write a check to THEMSELVES, then cash it at the bank that they have the account at. I've asked them why they just don't fill out a withdrawal slip (No,they do not use the ATM). They either say this method is easier, or just do not understand that you can withdraw money from a checking acct.

Is this behavior rooted in the way banks operated before I became an adult (the 80s)? Are my relatives just daft?


One of my banks prefers the "writing a check to yourself" method... it's possible that they were asked to do it that way, FWIW.

harlock001 said:   I have a couple of older family members who will write a check to THEMSELVES, then cash it at the bank that they have the account at. I've asked them why they just don't fill out a withdrawal slip (No,they do not use the ATM). They either say this method is easier, or just do not understand that you can withdraw money from a checking acct.

Is this behavior rooted in the way banks operated before I became an adult (the 80s)? Are my relatives just daft?
Banks don't typically have counter slips anymore, so you have to see the teller, ask for the slip, verify your account number, fill out the slip, verify ID, etc. Then the teller has to do all the same to make sure there aren't any typos on slip, make sure your name is associated with the account number, etc. Even harder if you should happen to come to the drive through window.

It's a whole lot easier to just walk up to the teller with your check made out to yourself, endorse it, and hand over the check and ID to the teller.

dcwilbur said:   harlock001 said:   I have a couple of older family members who will write a check to THEMSELVES, then cash it at the bank that they have the account at. I've asked them why they just don't fill out a withdrawal slip (No,they do not use the ATM). They either say this method is easier, or just do not understand that you can withdraw money from a checking acct.

Is this behavior rooted in the way banks operated before I became an adult (the 80s)? Are my relatives just daft?
It's a whole lot easier to just walk up to the teller with your check made out to yourself, endorse it, and hand over the check and ID to the teller.
Even easier if you can stick it in an ATM or just take a picture of it.

dcwilbur said:   harlock001 said:   I have a couple of older family members who will write a check to THEMSELVES, then cash it at the bank that they have the account at. I've asked them why they just don't fill out a withdrawal slip (No,they do not use the ATM). They either say this method is easier, or just do not understand that you can withdraw money from a checking acct.

Is this behavior rooted in the way banks operated before I became an adult (the 80s)? Are my relatives just daft?
Banks don't typically have counter slips anymore, so you have to see the teller, ask for the slip, verify your account number, fill out the slip, verify ID, etc. Then the teller has to do all the same to make sure there aren't any typos on slip, make sure your name is associated with the account number, etc. Even harder if you should happen to come to the drive through window.

It's a whole lot easier to just walk up to the teller with your check made out to yourself, endorse it, and hand over the check and ID to the teller.


You can actually just walk up to the teller in a jacket with your hood up and slip them a note asking for money. They will just hand it to you, usually in some sort of bag to make it convenient to carry, and then walk out.

Why waste a check to make a withdrawal?

I typically use the ATM.

But when I do go inside I simply tell the cashier I would like to withdraw XX amount from account number xxxx, I show my drivers license and they hand over the cash. Other then my receipt no paperwork is involved.

harlock001 said:   I have a couple of older family members who will write a check to THEMSELVES, then cash it at the bank that they have the account at. I've asked them why they just don't fill out a withdrawal slip (No,they do not use the ATM). They either say this method is easier, or just do not understand that you can withdraw money from a checking acct.

Is this behavior rooted in the way banks operated before I became an adult (the 80s)? Are my relatives just daft?


I do that frequently. Usually when I need to get money (for whatever reason) in a form other than a stack of twenties.

Yes. But consider what happened to me when I did this in January. I made a check out to myself from Bank B and took it to Bank A to deposit it. Bank A processed it and then got a "deposit returned action" from Bank B and then billed me a fee for a rejected deposit item. Neither bank account was recently opened and I had money in Bank B to cover the check amount. The online check image on Bank B's website showed "RETURNED" stamped on it.

You need to ask the bank you are opening the new account with. Some let you write a check to your name, others want the check to be made out to the bank's name (for deposit in your account).



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