Where do I find my US savings bonds?

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I remember growing up that my grandparents, aunts & uncles, and parents would give me savings bonds as gifts for my birthday and other holidays. Where, or how, could I go about finding out how many savings bonds are under my name? If my memory serves me right, I should have a decent amount of cash in those bonds. Has anyone found themselves in my situation before and recovered their bonds?

Any help would be much appreciated - thanks!

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The treasury can look them
Up using your ssn

ellory said:   I undestand that google is very hard to use

Already used google, directed me to the treasury direct website... entered my social.... no beans.

Thanks though.

Ask mommy and daddy?

woowoo2 said:   Ask mommy and daddy?

If only it where that easy....

ScarletKnight22 said:   ellory said:   I undestand that google is very hard to use

Already used google, directed me to the treasury direct website... entered my social.... no beans.

Thanks though.

Funny I thought you had to make a written request by mail. That's what the link says

ScarletKnight22 said:   ellory said:   I undestand that google is very hard to use

Already used google, directed me to the treasury direct website... entered my social.... no beans.

Thanks though.


Where did you enter your social?

" ...What should I do if my paper savings bond has been lost, stolen, or destroyed?

Simply fill out the form for Lost, Stolen, or Destroyed U.S. Savings Bonds (Form PD F 1048) and mail it to the address provided on the form.

If you don't have a listing of your savings bonds' issue dates and serial numbers, write to Savings Bonds, Parkersburg, WV 26106-7012. Provide as much information on the bond as possible and request a search of our records. We will replace your savings bonds if we can establish that a person entitled to cash the bonds hasn't done so..."

ScarletKnight22 said:   Already used google, directed me to the treasury direct website... entered my social.... no beans.

Thanks though.
I think I've seen the online search you're talking about. If my memory is correct, it only searches for "lost" bonds, such as bonds that have matured but were not cashed in, were returned to sender, etc. It's not the same as what you need in your situation.

http://www.treasuryhunt.gov/

is the service that lets you search online but it is limited....
http://abcnews.go.com/Business/unclaimed-money-savings-bond-trea...

Q: I received savings bonds as a gift. Should I search under my social security number or the person's who gave me the bonds?

A: Both. In 1974, the Treasury started asking for a social when issuing a bond. Gift bonds are allowed to be listed in the name of the giver or the receiver.

Q: I think I bought bonds before 1974. How do I search for those?

A: The Treasury Hunt website only lists savings bonds purchased from 1974 to the present, because it is organized by social security number, and that is when socials started being required. If you believe you may be owed money from an older bond, you can request a hand search by filling out a form here or by calling 1-800-553-2663.

Conspiracy theories aside about why the government is ending paper-saving bonds, the actual reason is because of people like the OP who waste the Treasury's time and resources looking for old bonds they lost or think they may have had 20 years ago.

Your parents may have cashed in the bonds to use for your college needs or other reasons over the years. If there were bonds in your name in the family files, you probably would have received them long ago.

My ex cashed in my daughter's savings bonds that she received from relatives just after she moved out on me. This money was used for god knows what. She already had over $1000 per month from me.

I remembered winning $100 as an award at a Science Fair back in the late 80s, early 90s. I left at my parent's house when I moved out, was subsequently lost to Hurricane Katrina. Do you think those bonds are recoverable?

broquer said:   Conspiracy theories aside about why the government is ending paper-saving bonds, the actual reason is because of people like the OP who waste the Treasury's time and resources looking for old bonds they lost or think they may have had 20 years ago.

While the press dollar coins all day long so they can pay $100 to overnight ship them and people cash in on the rewards. I think you are off on why they are getting rid of paper bonds. They don't want to make them as easy to attain. Not everyone is going to go online to buy them and as it was you could buy 5k at the bank and at TD - I wonder if they won't lower this to 5k total.

broquer said:   Conspiracy theories aside about why the government is ending paper-saving bonds, the actual reason is because of people like the OP who waste the Treasury's time and resources looking for old bonds they lost or think they may have had 20 years ago.

Please never post in this thread again. Thanks.

IrishTomBunny said:   Your parents may have cashed in the bonds to use for your college needs or other reasons over the years. If there were bonds in your name in the family files, you probably would have received them long ago.

My ex cashed in my daughter's savings bonds that she received from relatives just after she moved out on me. This money was used for god knows what. She already had over $1000 per month from me.


Parents did not pay for my college and did not cash in my bonds, so I asked if they knew where they were. We took a ride over to the vault and found ~30 in there, still not as many as I was expecting. Went to my aunts house today where we used to live before we bought our own house and BOOM they where there. Thank you jesus.

If only more "where did my savings bonds go" stories ended this well.

Congrats OP.

There really are not government records on bonds that were issued by paper. My Dad made me keep track of each serial number in a ledger book stored away from the bonds. If the bonds were ever lost you can provide the serial number and they can reissue the bond as long as it was not cashed. There is a computer program with the government that will tell you what your bond is worth. The series EE bonds quit earning interest after 30 years. Remember that all of the interest on the bonds is deferred. This may be taxable to you if you did not pay tax on the bonds each year. These are a couple of things to consider.

ScarletKnight22 said:   IrishTomBunny said:   Your parents may have cashed in the bonds to use for your college needs or other reasons over the years. If there were bonds in your name in the family files, you probably would have received them long ago.

My ex cashed in my daughter's savings bonds that she received from relatives just after she moved out on me. This money was used for god knows what. She already had over $1000 per month from me.


Parents did not pay for my college and did not cash in my bonds, so I asked if they knew where they were. We took a ride over to the vault and found ~30 in there, still not as many as I was expecting. Went to my aunts house today where we used to live before we bought our own house and BOOM they where there. Thank you jesus.


Congratulations on your happy ending!

ScarletKnight22 said: .... Thank you jesus.remember to give him 10%



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