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I had 2 batches of checks. One from 1001 to 1025, and the other from 1026 to 1050. I forgot to use the first batch from 1001 to 1025. I used up 1026 to 1050. I ordered a new batch that came beginning with 1051. Now I want to start using the first batch from 1001 to 1025. My question is if I write a check with no. 1001, could it be returned since it could look suspicious because my last written check was 1050, and now it goes back to 1001? Could the bank return it?

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I write about one personal check a year, usually for a big home repair.

In my business, I try and use nothing BUT checks ... (more)

Crazytree (Aug. 01, 2011 @ 2:28a) |

I notice that may possible also.
Sometimes, bank even don't check the name and account name match or not.
I learn don't se... (more)

Cwolf2008 (Aug. 01, 2011 @ 10:47a) |

I remember many years ago when a "higher" number on the check sequence was considered "more acceptable" for certain merc... (more)

fedguy (Aug. 01, 2011 @ 5:20p) |

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You'll be fine. Unless the check looks suspicious for other reasons.

I've written checks that were out of sequence. From my experience, they never had an issue with it. The monthly statement does show an asterisk character next to check numbers that were processed out of sequence.

Specific example: Check number 1051 and Check number 008 posted on the same monthly period. The check number 008 is from a starter check book issued many years ago.

FWF is amazing. OP posts @ 2:29am, gets good answers. No need to wait until the bank opens to call and ask the question

the check number is really for your purposes, it has no relevance to anyone

skh12 said:   the check number is really for your purposes, it has no relevance to anyone

I work at a small credit union so YMMV. Part of my job is processing share draft exception items.

A check number wildly out of sequence will probably show up on my exception report. I generally wouldn't return it(ie bounce it) unless the signiture didn't match and/or it's for an unusual amount. I certainly would attempt to contact the member about it before even considering returning it.

So basically, I think you might receive a call from your bank to verify, but it shouldn't be a problem.

Your check will probably be flagged on your statement, so you know that it was out of sequence, but otherwise they don't really care.

Just fyi, the date is equally useless- post date a check for Aug 1 2835, and they will cash it today.

i've been doing this for years without any problems. my wife and i share checking accts and i give her a pad of checks and i grab another pad of checks for myself. when i order new checks i don't keep the original sequencing and usually order new checks beginning with the number 1001.

I've done it. It gets marked on the statement but it goes through.

FW10001 said:   FWF is amazing. OP posts @ 2:29am, gets good answers. No need to wait until the bank opens to call and ask the question

Questions like this are posted here to find out how others experienced the same problem. The person answering the question at the bank might have no idea & just be making up the answer.

Checks have numbers?


Check
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Bizatch said:   Checks have numbers?
Thanks for all the answers. I am referring to the 4-digit number on the upper-right corner. I have attached an image.

FW10001 said:   FWF is amazing. OP posts @ 2:29am, gets good answers. No need to wait until the bank opens to call and ask the question

Google is amazing. Type in question, get answer 2 seconds later and people don't have to answer the question at all.
Google

I've seen notes on statements stating a check number was missing but never had an issue with any clearing.

I used to carry one check around in my wallet, so as to not have to carry my checkbook. It was several years old when I eventually used it and definitely out of sequence. No harm done.

My checks don't even have a number on them.

I write so few checks, that I never ordered any. I keep a couple checks that the bank teller printed for me. If I use them, I will ask for a couple more next time I have to stop in their lobby. These checks have no pre-printed check number, account number, name, etc...

I have never had a problem. But I assume they get flagged for manual verification (my blank claims they will charge a fee if they see more than 5 in a given statement cycle)

Bizatch said:   Checks have numbers?

What's a "check"?

hsilman said:   A check number wildly out of sequence will probably show up on my exception report. I generally wouldn't return it(ie bounce it) unless the signiture didn't match and/or it's for an unusual amount. I certainly would attempt to contact the member about it before even considering returning it.

So basically, I think you might receive a call from your bank to verify, but it shouldn't be a problem.

Yup. I've gotten a call from the bank about a check wildly out of sequence (the business went through about 150 checks a month, and this one's number was off by about a thousand). Otherwise it's never been a problem. The people who receive your checks will almost never cash them in the same order you sent them.

TPaine said:   Just fyi, the date is equally useless- post date a check for Aug 1 2835, and they will cash it today.
This is more of a problem. When you put a stop payment on a check, the bank only keeps it in their computers for 6 months to a year. In theory, any check which is dated more than 3 months old is "stale" and the bank is supposed to refuse it. This is equivalent of a permanent stop payment, so they claim even 6 months is overkill for a real stop payment. But they rarely ever look at the date on a check and frequently will just cash it.

We made out a paycheck to an employee who was leaving the company and moving out of state.
2 months later she called to say she lost it.
We put a stop payment on it and issued a replacement check.
She cashed the replacement check.
At month 8 the stop payment expired.
At month 9 her mother found the missing original check while cleaning her room.
Mom didn't know we had issued a replacement check, and deposited it for her (daughter was out of the country).
The bank didn't notice / didn't care about the date and cashed it.

It took me 2 months to get that cleared up, and we were fortunate that the mother was honest and reimbursed us for the extra check out of her personal funds (her daughter had already spent the money).

i remember when check numbers where a big deal. When I got my first checking account people said to write a lot of small checks to get the count up quickly as larger numbers were trusted more than smaller ones. Now checks are easy to print, and the numbers and the dates are rarely used except in special cases as noted above.

I use both preprinted and handwritten checks in my business, which are about 500# off from each other. They get used interchangeably (depending on how many line items I need to pay). If its just 1 item, I handwrite the check, but if its to pay 20 invoices, I usually print it. They get mixed and matched. No issues in 4 years doing this so far-though I'm sure there have been some wtf moments in proof on these.

Bizatch said:   Checks have numbers?

People still hand write checks? That's what bill pay is for.

OT: using checks with prior address printed on them also seems fine with banks.

wilesmt said:   Bizatch said:   Checks have numbers?

People still hand write checks? That's what bill pay is for.

There are always exceptions. My Japanese rent is paid in US Dollars (cash or check only) and the amount is determined by the exchange rate(USD to JPY) for that day. So I have to write the check at the "rent" window for whatever the amount is on the day I pay it.

newgun said:   OT: using checks with prior address printed on them also seems fine with banks.

FWIW, using checks with "Queen Elizabeth" as the name printed on them also is fine.

I saw one once. The only problem was that it was NSF. I blamed it on the hardships of being a modern monarch.

fortezza said:   i remember when check numbers where a big deal. When I got my first checking account people said to write a lot of small checks to get the count up quickly as larger numbers were trusted more than smaller ones. Now checks are easy to print, and the numbers and the dates are rarely used except in special cases as noted above.

I remember back in the dark ages (late 80's) when I used to use checks (remember when grocery stores didn't take credit cards?), and places would get hinky about low numbered checks and checks without name and address. When I opened a new checking account, I took the small supply of starter checks the bank supplied without name or check number and ran them through a laser printer, printing my name and address and a made-up high check number. I'd save them for those occasions where someone objected to a low-numbered check.

More recently, I opened a checking account and didn't plan to ever order checks for it, since I now do everything electronically. But to set up direct deposit and direct debit for a few places, they insisted on having checks with my address printed on them. So again, I took the starter checks from the bank and ran 'em through the laser printer, putting my name & address on them. Like that makes them more official? People are stupid.

Chris.

Quikboy4 said:   I used to carry one check around in my wallet, so as to not have to carry my checkbook. It was several years old when I eventually used it and definitely out of sequence. No harm done.you must be old. all the old people i know do this, but i don't do this anymore after they invented the credit card!

newgun said:   OT: using checks with prior address printed on them also seems fine with banks.
Until recently I was still using my First Chicago Bank checks with Chase (First Chicago -> Bank One -> Chase). Everything on the check was wrong except my own name and the numbers at the bottom (I haven't lived at that address for decades, the area code of the phone number isn't even used for this area anymore, the second printed name isn't on the account anymore, even the bank's been out of existence for decades), and they still worked fine. Every time I'd walk into a Chase branch I'd ask if they would order a new checkbook for me for free, so that my checks didn't look this stupid, and they'd always decline, suggesting I keep using the old ones. (I use so few checks that I just couldn't justify the cost of printing a new book. It took them swallowing WaMu to get me Chase checks with up to date info.)

hmmm, maybe I should ask Chase to replace my WaMu checks.

I still use WaMu checks, I write 1 check a month to my landlord and still have 3 books untouched so I don't think I'm going to run out for quite a while.

olegos said:   newgun said:   OT: using checks with prior address printed on them also seems fine with banks.
Until recently I was still using my First Chicago Bank checks with Chase (First Chicago -> Bank One -> Chase). Everything on the check was wrong except my own name and the numbers at the bottom (I haven't lived at that address for decades, the area code of the phone number isn't even used for this area anymore, the second printed name isn't on the account anymore, even the bank's been out of existence for decades), and they still worked fine. Every time I'd walk into a Chase branch I'd ask if they would order a new checkbook for me for free, so that my checks didn't look this stupid, and they'd always decline, suggesting I keep using the old ones. (I use so few checks that I just couldn't justify the cost of printing a new book. It took them swallowing WaMu to get me Chase checks with up to date info.)
My National City checks with the wrong account number (old -- they changed them) still seem to work fine with PNC, without any delay. They must have some sort of mapping in their systems. I even use that old account number for ACH (since it's easily accessible) and it works fine.

kami333 said:   hmmm, maybe I should ask Chase to replace my WaMu checks.

I still use WaMu checks, I write 1 check a month to my landlord and still have 3 books untouched so I don't think I'm going to run out for quite a while.

Yes, do it quickly, while it's still free -- see this. I too still have many original WaMu checks left, and use them interchangeably with the new Chase checks, speaking of using checks out of sequence.

wilesmt said:   Bizatch said:   Checks have numbers?

People still hand write checks? That's what bill pay is for.


You must not have kids in school. Always writing checks to: PTA/PTO, after school clubs, field trips, sports, etc.

larryc said:   wilesmt said:   Bizatch said:   Checks have numbers?

People still hand write checks? That's what bill pay is for.


You must not have kids in school. Always writing checks to: PTA/PTO, after school clubs, field trips, sports, etc.


I mainly write checks like that too for school and to pay local property taxes, or federal taxes -- Texas has no state income or property tax.

fortezza said:   i remember when check numbers where a big deal. When I got my first checking account people said to write a lot of small checks to get the count up quickly as larger numbers were trusted more than smaller ones. Now checks are easy to print, and the numbers and the dates are rarely used except in special cases as noted above.
Whenever I've opened a checking account in-branch, the banker has asked what check number we'd like to start with. Apparently, people switching banks often don't want to duplicate numbers they used on their old account in order to simplify record-keeping. So, it'd be easy for someone who cares to just ask that the checks start at 8300 (making anyone who bothered looking wonder how a 20-year old had written so many checks). I actually did this for my last business - I ordered checks starting at 5000 just in case anyone looked.

Unless a bank offers free checks, it's dramatically cheaper to order elsewhere. (I've been very happy with the checks from Costco's partner.) In that case, you actually have to specify what number to start with.

What would happen if you had two checks with the same number? Like if you accidentally used the wrong starting number. Are those "duplicate" checks still valid?

jetsfan92588 said:   What would happen if you had two checks with the same number? Like if you accidentally used the wrong starting number. Are those "duplicate" checks still valid?

Yes they're still valid. Check numbers are for your records only. If you have two checks with the same number cashed in the same statement period, your bank should make a notation on your statement, just as they would when checks are cashed out of order. But they'll both be processed and will not bounce.

If they're not cashed in the same statement period, you might get a notation for having checks cashed out of order, depending on other checks that have been cashed in a similar time frame, but that's it.

AugustFour said:   My question is if I write a check with no. 1001, could it be returned since it could look suspicious because my last written check was 1050, and now it goes back to 1001? Could the bank return it?Let me check...

ThePessimist said:   fortezza said:   i remember when check numbers where a big deal. When I got my first checking account people said to write a lot of small checks to get the count up quickly as larger numbers were trusted more than smaller ones.
Whenever ...


I think fortezza is referring to the era before you were allowed to go elsewhere to get your checks. What s/he describes was very very common practice in the up until the late 70s ... when checks were king and merchants had few ways or information to use to confirm a check's validity.

Those times were so different from today, it probably would take several pages to explain to most younger members here except to say today is better.

BEEFjerKAY said:   ThePessimist said:   fortezza said:   i remember when check numbers where a big deal. When I got my first checking account people said to write a lot of small checks to get the count up quickly as larger numbers were trusted more than smaller ones.
Whenever ...


I think fortezza is referring to the era before you were allowed to go elsewhere to get your checks. What s/he describes was very very common practice in the up until the late 70s ... when checks were king and merchants had few ways or information to use to confirm a check's validity.

Those times were so different from today, it probably would take several pages to explain to most younger members here except to say today is better.


Green for BEEFjerKAY. I was in college when my roommate from San Francisco showed up with (GASP) CHECKS WITH PICTURES ON THEM!!! Wells Fargo put stagecoaches on their checks. Other banks quickly followed suit!

I use credit or bankcards exclusively, and not just because of the rewards. Do you get as frustrated as I do when after waiting in the checkout line at the supermarket, someone pulls out their checkbook and takes five minutes to fill it out?

Skipping 4 Messages...
BEEFjerKAY said:   ThePessimist said:   fortezza said:   i remember when check numbers where a big deal. When I got my first checking account people said to write a lot of small checks to get the count up quickly as larger numbers were trusted more than smaller ones.
Whenever ...


I think fortezza is referring to the era before you were allowed to go elsewhere to get your checks. What s/he describes was very very common practice in the up until the late 70s ... when checks were king and merchants had few ways or information to use to confirm a check's validity.

Those times were so different from today, it probably would take several pages to explain to most younger members here except to say today is better.


I remember many years ago when a "higher" number on the check sequence was considered "more acceptable" for certain merchants to deposit them. It was felt that the account would have a longer period of existence which makes for a more "stable" financial history of the check writer. Checks with low numbers (especially starting with 0001) were associated with accounts that were in existence for a very small time period (making them more "risky").

Is there a check sequence number for electronic checks? I would not think so, but I don't generate electronic checks.



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