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The CISPA bill, which was just passed in the House of Rep, just caught my attention. Out of curiosity, I had a look at who was supporting it, and was shocked to find many financial institutions listed.

Below are the consumer-facing banks and insurance companies that are supporting CISPA. I hope some find this useful for deciding whether to support or remove support from their bank:

  • AEGON
  • Allianz Life Insurance Co.
  • Allstate (bailout)
  • American Express (bailout)
  • Bank of America (bailout)
  • Barclays PLC
  • Capital One (bailout)
  • Charles Shwab
  • CIGNA
  • Citigroup, Inc. (bailout)
  • Discover Financial Services (bailout)
  • E*Trade
  • Fidelity Investments
  • Fifth Third Bankcorp (bailout)
  • The Hartford (bailout)
  • HSBC
  • Ing
  • JPMorgan Chase (bailout)
  • Liberty Mutual
  • M&T Bank (bailout)
  • MasterCard
  • MetLife, Inc.
  • Nationwide (bailout)
  • The PNC Financial Services Group, Inc. (bailout)
  • Prudential Financial Inc.
  • RBS Americas
  • State Farm Insurance
  • SunTrust Banks, Inc. (bailout)
  • TD Bank
  • Wells Fargo & Company (bailout)
  • Visa


The "(bailout)" indicates FIs that also took a government bailout. Some of them are sadly also in the top 5 highest spenders on political contributions (Citibank, BofA, Chase, Wells Fargo).

Member Summary
Most Recent Posts
Not without penalty. It's all about penalty. AT&T monitored customers and voluntarily disclosed their communications t... (more)

bonghead (May. 06, 2012 @ 12:45p) |

I haven't had a chance to read the bill yet but was hoping someone could answer these basic questions.

So are the banks o... (more)

jetsfan92588 (May. 06, 2012 @ 11:37p) |

Just had a look at the Chase bailout figures along with the NASA budget. Results:

Chase bailout: $94.7 billion
NASA histo... (more)

bonghead (Jun. 09, 2012 @ 11:40a) |


How about an overview of CISPA for the unenlightened?

RedCelicaGT said:   How about an overview of CISPA for the unenlightened?
It's a means to give the government broader surveillance powers, to get information without a warrant. Here is the CNet article on it.

The big corps are supporting it. It seems to be opposed by all the mainstream civil liberties and privacy groups (e.g. ACLU, EFF).

Here's a video of Richard Stallman talking about it.

It will get veto'd by the white house. Link: http://mashable.com/2012/04/29/where-cispa-stands-now/

ymarker said:   It will get veto'd by the white house. Link: http://mashable.com/2012/04/29/where-cispa-stands-now/qui

I hope you're right. I don't have quite the faith you have.

TexAgg99 said:   ymarker said:   It will get veto'd by the white house. Link: http://mashable.com/2012/04/29/where-cispa-stands-now/qui

I hope you're right. I don't have quite the faith you have.
The senate will make some minor change that doesn't really solve anything, the house will moan but pass it, and the president will make a nice speech on how that small change fixed everything and sign the bill. (no, I don't know what the small change will be, but I know what pattern to expect...)

Although I would tend to agree with psm321, I think the white house has taken grief over supporting the "Patriot" Act, and will probably have too much pressure to stick with intent to veto.

Regardless, it's the thought that counts, and a failing bill does not excuse the FI's above that supported it. At a minimum, I will boycott the banks that support CISPA.

My approach to a boycott:

I will not open new accounts at those banks, and I will keep only minimum balances in existing accounts held at the banks that support CISPA. They will be marked in Quicken as CISPA supporters to serve as a constant reminder. I won't use credit cards from those banks (if not close the accounts). It's the least I can do.

ymarker said:   It will get veto'd by the white house. Link: http://mashable.com/2012/04/29/where-cispa-stands-now/

Obama also promised to veto the NDAA, then passed it. I wouldn't hold your breath.

So, how long until we are only allowed to build our houses out of clear, incombustible glass; can't turn our televisions off; take our Soma daily; pick our newborn kids up at the hatchery; etc....

On another note though, how would one boycott Visa????

I dont think you can boycott this many of these organizations... too big and widespread.

This requires letters to Obama, senators, and the companies

This is just further encouraging me to switch my BoA accounts over to my credit union PatelCo.

I have the same notion about Chase.. this is the nudge I needed. I'll support my credit union from now on.

gatzdon said:   So, how long until we are only allowed to build our houses out of clear, incombustible glass; can't turn our televisions off; take our Soma daily; pick our newborn kids up at the hatchery; etc....

On another note though, how would one boycott Visa????


Cash

hirenrp said:   gatzdon said:   
On another note though, how would one boycott Visa????


Cash

If you are willing to give up whatever rewards you're getting, there is cash as mentioned, and also debit cards. MC/Discover/AMEX would normally be options, but they happen to also support CISPA.

Some may not realize that it's often possible to opt-out of the visa/mc networks on their debit card. You can tell your bank you do not want a visa/mc logo on your debit card, and you'll get the old fashioned debit/atm card, often with a different number of digits than 16. This will ensure your debit card does not use or sponsor the credit card network. I do this anyway as a security measure, since I never intend to use my debit card as a visa card, whereas a thief would gladly do so.

Hmm.. there is that Japanese credit card network, JCB I think.. is that in the US?

bonghead said:   Although I would tend to agree with psm321, I think the white house has taken grief over supporting the "Patriot" Act, and will probably have too much pressure to stick with intent to veto.

Regardless, it's the thought that counts, and a failing bill does not excuse the FI's above that supported it. At a minimum, I will boycott the banks that support CISPA.

My approach to a boycott:

I will not open new accounts at those banks, and I will keep only minimum balances in existing accounts held at the banks that support CISPA. They will be marked in Quicken as CISPA supporters to serve as a constant reminder. I won't use credit cards from those banks (if not close the accounts). It's the least I can do.


Do you also plan to boycott the companies mentioned in the CNET article as supporters?

the House Intelligence committee proudly lists letters of support from Facebook, Microsoft, Oracle, Symantec, Verizon, AT&T, Intel, and trade association CTIA, which counts representatives of T-Mobile, Sybase, Nokia, and Qualcomm as board members.

arktc said:   
Do you also plan to boycott the companies mentioned in the CNET article as supporters?

Yes, but for me that's easy. Incidentally, I don't tend to support many of these companies anyway (at least to the extent that I'm aware). I don't even use Windows and wouldn't touch Facebook with a barge pole anyway. And I don't use any of those mobile phone providers.

BTW, I only listed finance related companies in this thread, but there is a very big list of CISPA supporters here.

Some of the big monopolistic broadband providers like Time Warner might be difficult to avoid. A little known option is to find a WISP (wireless providers are often understated, poorly advertized, and tend to go unnoticed).

There is a petition to the WH to veto it. Though doesn't look like enough people from the community have voted for it yet and would likely fall off if it doesn't hit the 25k mark by may 20.
Link
Here is one for ACTA
Link

About the JCB card I mentioned.. they are available to residents of California, Connecticut, Illinois, Nevada, New York, New Jersey, Oregon, Washington and Hawaii.

They have a 1% CashBack rebate as well.

bonghead said:   About the JCB card I mentioned.. they are available to residents of California, Connecticut, Illinois, Nevada, New York, New Jersey, Oregon, Washington and Hawaii.

They have a 1% CashBack rebate as well.


But JCB can go through DFS processing network. Just FYI.

ymarker said:   It will get veto'd by the white house. Link: http://mashable.com/2012/04/29/where-cispa-stands-now/ Yeah, like with the NDAA?... BHO has passed GWB in terms of overall suck. Something I didn't think possible.

sgogo said:   I dont think you can boycott this many of these organizations... too big and widespread.

This requires letters to Obama, senators, and the companies


Obama administration has already threatened to veto it. But it passed in the house. Hopefully the senate will not make the same mistake.

I've updated the list to mark the CISPA banks that took a government bailout.

This will highlight the banks whose poor banking practices got them in trouble, and who then used taxpayer money to recover, just prior to supporting a bill that reduces the civil liberties of the consumers who bailed them out.

IOW, "bailout" designates the back-stabbing CISPA supporters.

TheFinalProphecy said:   This is just further encouraging me to switch my BoA accounts over to my credit union PatelCo.I'm not sure how effective that action will be. The legislation is supported by the Credit Union National Association and the National Association of Federal Credit Unions.

A VP for Symantec wrote a letter of support for CISPA. In part, she wrote, "In order for information sharing to be effective, information must be shared in a timely manner, with the right people or organizations, and with the understanding that so long as an entity shares information in good faith, it will not be faced with legal liability. Your bill elegantly addresses these critical success factors."

Cheri F. McGuire
VP Global Government Affairs and Cybersecurity Policy
Symantec Corporation
cheri_mcguire@symantec.com

Here are some alternatives to the CISPA supporters:

Bank: ----
Brokerage: Scottrade
Anti-virus: Kaspersky
Computer: Asus, Acer, Toshiba (Microsoft and Intel support CISPA)
Cell phone: NONE, unless you have a regional provider that is not on the list (e.g. MetroPCS) Or you could use a company that piggybacks on one of the main providers but you're still indirectly supporting the Sprint, VZW, ATT, or T-Mobile.
Television: Dish Network

Here's a more comprehensive list of CISPA supporters.

caterpillar123 said:   TheFinalProphecy said:   This is just further encouraging me to switch my BoA accounts over to my credit union PatelCo.I'm not sure how effective that action will be. The legislation is supported by the Credit Union National Association and the National Association of Federal Credit Unions.
If the credit unions are supporting CISPA, that's a good point and thanks for pointing that out. But would you mind giving your source for that? My searches are coming up dry.

BTW, TheFinalProphecy is still making a good ethical move. Sometimes the lesser of evils is the only option.

BofA is clearly the a greatest evil here -- BofA engaged in unethical banking and got into a position of needing a bailout, then they took bailout money from the taxpayer, then they contributed over $1M to political candidates (so in effect they blew taxpayer money to influence politics, thus dissipating the influence of individual human beings), then back-stabbed the people who bailed them out by supporting CISPA.

Letters of Support

The Credit Union associations are listed under "04-25-12 11 Financial Trade Associations Support CISPA."

Since when are search warrants or court orders required to get big corporations to turn information over to the gestapo government that exists in this country? They've always done whatever they want without penalty. This doesn't change anything. I've been assuming that everything I do and say on the internet or with credit cards is being tracked. The 4th and 5th amendments haven't been properly enforced for decades. CISPA is just about the most redundant, useless piece of legislation ever. It would be like congress finally admitting that the 16th amendment was never properly ratified, and now, in 2012, getting the four states that voted against it to vote in favor, and then claiming that it's now a legitimate law. What Richard Stallman said first in that interview is highly relevant - it's not the motive of a law, but its effect, that's important. Taking it a step further, it's not the legitimate passing of a law, but its enforcement, that's important. Effectively, CISPA has been in full force for quite some time already, as has the 16th amendment. The formality of actually passing these laws in a legitimate way is basically irrelevant. The golden rule is that he who has the gold (or in this case, the guns, tanks, shields, body armor, tear gas, and military prisons set up and ready for incoming "combatants"), rules.

It's funny how the government, along with big business and mass media are all in bed together, frightening the public on a massive scale with their fear mongering, and then people who respond by building bunkers and buying gas masks get ridiculed for being paranoid.

DTASFAB said:   Since when are search warrants or court orders required to get big corporations to turn information over to the gestapo government that exists in this country? They've always done whatever they want without penalty.
Not without penalty. It's all about penalty. AT&T monitored customers and voluntarily disclosed their communications to the gov, without warrant. This was prior to the Patriot Act, and AT&T was rightly sued for it. The Patriot Act was brought in to make companies immune to damages resulting from unwarranted surveillance. CISPA will further remove liability, so companies do not have to be responsible or diligent with protecting customer data. Under CISPA, they can share it with reckless disregard, and not be held accountable.

Also from a criminal standpoint, LEAs already violate the 4th amendment to some extent, doing general searches on non-suspects to fish for something, but the evidence that's gathered illegally cannot be used in court, which makes the collection less interesting. CISPA will enable unwarranted data collection to be used against their victim. This will have the effect of encouraging the unwarranted surveillance against the masses, because the illicitly gathered data can be used. So non-criminals caught in the crossfire can then become subject to unreasonable searches.

I haven't had a chance to read the bill yet but was hoping someone could answer these basic questions.

So are the banks only supporting this because it absolves them of liability? Is their goal to actually share information with the government, or do they just want to have the option to? Does CISPA in any way require banks to share information that they are currently not required to share?

Just had a look at the Chase bailout figures along with the NASA budget. Results:

Chase bailout: $94.7 billion
NASA historical peak annual budget (2011): <$18.5 billion

I find this insanely disgusting. Taxpayers paid 4+ years worth of NASA budget (i.e. investing in the future) to save a backstabbing CISPA-supporting bank. What a lousy investment Chase turned out to be.



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