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The only positive thing about buying an overpriced house in a NYC/California/etc area is the chance/likelihood that the value increases while you own it.

Priorities do have an impact. Proximity to great health care becomes much more important as you get older. That's one of the reasons why Panama has become a popular, and now increasingly "expensive", place to live for ex-pats, due to the proximity of Canal Zone medical facilities.

tinlizzy said:   JaxFL said:   Instead of debating the varied diversity, and personal preference... That certainly is a part of the world, why not give personal examples of how each of you , in your own way, associate and relate to with the topic.

I'm a single female.
I live in a midwest city in Iowa, pop.110,000.
I own a 4 bedroom, 1700 sq. ft. Craftsman bungalow worth approx $100,000 (purchased for $40K in 1988 when I was 21) I paid off my house when I was 32. My property taxes are $1,200/yr
I have made over $50K/yr since my mid 20's ($92,000 last year).
I sent my child to parochial school and he is in his senior year in a state college and I pay half his tuition.
I have vacationed with my child on 4 continents (21 countries and dozens of cities), been to WDW and Hawaii. I've been on 13 cruises. We go to NYC every other year to shop and see Broadway shows. I can afford to bring my mother on vacations and also let my son bring a friend occasionally, on my dime.
I have managed to save $490,000 for retirement so far - no company 401K match but I will receive a pension.
I come home for lunch everyday.
I've never had a cell phone....or a cell phone bill
I bought a 1995 Nissan Altima in 1997 for $10,000 and still drive it - it has 96,000 miles on it now and still gets 24/mpg (and it doesn't matter if it gets hit in the winter)
I could care less what people think I'm worth.
I have to put up with snow, mosquitos, and humidity.
I plan on retiring at 53.
It's okay if my city doesn't have everything I love because I have the money to travel several times a year.


I absolutely LOVE Iowa - get to go there about every 3 years - nicest people and LITERALLY breathtaking manicured farms. Many people on the coasts - esp. those who have never tried to buy - would be shocked to know that farmland there is INSANAELY expensive .... and being bought up by foreigners

Back in the day all of my rural ancestors moved to the cities (Austin, Dallas, Houston) and ofter looked down on their siblings who "stayed at home" as they did not become sophisticated and comfortable in the big cities.

Now, strangely, the wealthiest family members generally live in the most rural of areas due to a little rock formation known as the Haynesville Shale. These nouveau riche now laught at thier city siblings/cousins overrun with debt. These rural folk were were forced to invest wisely and saved/invested with the mindset that they never would be able to rely on home appreciation as a wealth builder.

Just sayin

And PLEASE don't tell anyone living in a college towns in the South from Austin to Starksville and into South Carolina that these cities are not in hot demand.

Their are petitions being drawn up in South Carolina to stop the Ohio diaspora.

RedWolfe01 said:   

There are nice places all over, its just what you want in particular. I live in a Condo in Dallas that is around that 100K price point -- but property taxes are high here. I can walk to the Dallas Arts district as well as two different "bar" districts. I can bike to 3 others as well as a great coffee shop. The only issue here is size, its small. The work that I do now *could* be telecommuted but most employer/contracts want you working from the office. (and those are 20-35 minute commutes -- last two jobs were/are in the suburbs and not downtown.

I really hate commutes, but not really wanting to live in the 'burbs either. (see: likes to walk to entertainment, above)


Where in Dallas do you live? I wouldn't have thought that anyplace within walking distance to the Arts district and the two bar districts (which I'm assuming must be Uptown and maybe Deep Ellum, or maybe Cedar Springs) would have condos for $100k. A friend of mine bought a nice condo just off Wycliff St, a block away from Cedar Springs, and it was IIRC in the $200-300k range.

tony6730 said:   Perhaps buy a place in cash and then just live there forever and enjoy?

Living it. Moved from bright lights big city to a top 10 cheapest. Bought in cash a fixer upper mansion on 5 acre lot, so way more than $100K. Reason for moving wasn't cost but to get away from craziness and greedy fam. Love the life style - no commute except travel, drop off kids at school, PTA, eat at home, laid back, friendly honest people, clean air, trees, NO TRAFFIC. Except damned bugs but you can't have it all. Itch for city life once in a while - that's cue to fly out my fam for a vacation wherever. Friend asked me to join a startup in NJ. Relocation required. Visited. No thanks. At a certain point in life when you have enough means, more isn't as attractive as quality of life.

seems like this discussion has [at least] 2 central questions that are technically unrelated: "city versus rural", and "cheap versus expensive".

plenty of us live in cheaper cities (perhaps not in the toniest parts of them) and have access to all the big-city advantages...so the two concepts are not mutually exclusive at all.

JJWG - fixer-upper mansion or McMansion? got pics? sounds like you are speaking OP's language with the lifestyle though.

It's all about understanding person-specific tradeoffs, values, and performance measurements. I work in downtown Chicago. I got a lot of flak from coworkers when I bought my townhouse almost 10 years ago, because I bought it near a freeway instead of near a commuter rail line. It costs me a fair amount to drive to work, including $300/month in parking. But it doesn't cost me nearly as much as it would to live on the near north side, because my townhouse costs 1/3 to 1/4 of the city (try getting 1700 sf, 2 car attached in Lincoln Park). I am fortunate that I have a job that lets me work a slightly flexible schedule (telework for an hour, drive in, work 9:30-6 at the office) in exchange for being on the road 7-9 days a month. I don't get all of the benefits of the city, but I'm also no longer in my 20s and chasing tail most nights.

That being said, I'm looking for a lower COL place for my retirement. Once my parents are gone, I have no need to live in a state like Illinois where my property taxes are considered low at 2% of market value, and I still have a 5% income tax and when I'm in the city the sales tax on restaurants is 10.5%! I have four major requirements, none of which would have been requirements when I finished graduate school 20 years ago:
- The same amount and quality of home space I have now, for 30% less per month
- Access within an hour by car to a similar level of medical care in the specialties which I need (emphasizes university towns with medical schools and teaching hospitals)
- Access to travel easily - near an Interstate, lots of cities within five hours by car, a serious airport within 100 miles; and
- Very few days under 40 degrees. I don't need the low 90s, but I don't mind them either. Over 96-97, however, and I start to take issue (ruling out much of Texas)

So about three years ago, I started researching in the wide triangle between Raleigh, Birmingham, and Nashville. I've pretty much ignored Atlanta, however. I have another five trips to the region planned for 2013, as it helps to have buckets of free flights, hotels, and one-way rental car days. Each day of each trip, I spend an hour or preferably two visiting neighborhoods in my price range to see how they live. By the end of 2013, I plan on narrowing my list down to two cities in the Carolinas and one along I-65.

I really feel like several posters in this thread are trying to prove how much they enjoy high/low COL areas, as if one is inherently better than the other.

I'm going to suggest that if you require internet validation on your choice of living then there's a strong chance you may not be enjoying it as much as you perpetuate that you do.

tony6730 said:   

The area I personally would be going to is either Northern Delaware, or Albany NY. Jobs in my field are not THAT difficult to get in those locaitons

I am sure I could get laid, but will I be happy? That I don't know. Really depends if I were able to make friends with some good people or not. If I were to make this move I would want to enjoy the extra money and go out a lot


You think Albany is a low cost of living? Compared to what? Albany is pretty high for housing. Then on top of that, there is the taxes which in NY state are pretty high wherever you go. I have family in Albany and it is certainly not cheap. On the other hand, I live out by Binghamton, NY which is about 2 hours west of Albany and this are is a very low cost of living. Back in 2006 I bought a 3 bedroom, 2 full bath house with a 2 car attached garage and 1/3 of an acre of land for $72,500. The house was built in 1987 too, so it is not like it is an old house.

The whole area out here on average is very low cost of living and the type of people that live in the area reflect that. That is not to say that there are no good jobs though, I work at Lockheed Martin which is 4 miles from my house and there are a few hospitals in the area and a SUNY college in Binghamton so there are plenty of high paying jobs. I make more money per year than what I paid for my house just as an example (that isn't a ton of money by any stretch, but it is a pretty good living, especially out here).

clemente21 said:   It's all about understanding person-specific tradeoffs, values, and performance measurements. I work in downtown Chicago. I got a lot of flak from coworkers when I bought my townhouse almost 10 years ago, because I bought it near a freeway instead of near a commuter rail line. It costs me a fair amount to drive to work, including $300/month in parking. But it doesn't cost me nearly as much as it would to live on the near north side, because my townhouse costs 1/3 to 1/4 of the city (try getting 1700 sf, 2 car attached in Lincoln Park). I am fortunate that I have a job that lets me work a slightly flexible schedule (telework for an hour, drive in, work 9:30-6 at the office) in exchange for being on the road 7-9 days a month. I don't get all of the benefits of the city, but I'm also no longer in my 20s and chasing tail most nights.

That being said, I'm looking for a lower COL place for my retirement. Once my parents are gone, I have no need to live in a state like Illinois where my property taxes are considered low at 2% of market value, and I still have a 5% income tax and when I'm in the city the sales tax on restaurants is 10.5%! I have four major requirements, none of which would have been requirements when I finished graduate school 20 years ago:
- The same amount and quality of home space I have now, for 30% less per month
- Access within an hour by car to a similar level of medical care in the specialties which I need (emphasizes university towns with medical schools and teaching hospitals)

- Access to travel easily - near an Interstate, lots of cities within five hours by car, a serious airport within 100 miles; and
- Very few days under 40 degrees. I don't need the low 90s, but I don't mind them either. Over 96-97, however, and I start to take issue (ruling out much of Texas)

So about three years ago, I started researching in the wide triangle between Raleigh, Birmingham, and Nashville. I've pretty much ignored Atlanta, however. I have another five trips to the region planned for 2013, as it helps to have buckets of free flights, hotels, and one-way rental car days. Each day of each trip, I spend an hour or preferably two visiting neighborhoods in my price range to see how they live. By the end of 2013, I plan on narrowing my list down to two cities in the Carolinas and one along I-65.


South Carolina was uber-hot for a while before the recession. If you pick the right town like Savannah, I see growth - like NC has already seen - over the next 20 years.

I hear some of the new resorts in SC are out of this world.

Once you move out of a high COL area, it is very hard to move back. You many not have the money, or everything would seem too expensive and could not justify moving back. Yet, real estate booms tend to happen more in high COL areas around the world.

clemente21 said:   It's all about understanding person-specific tradeoffs, values, and performance measurements. I work in downtown Chicago. I got a lot of flak from coworkers when I bought my townhouse almost 10 years ago, because I bought it near a freeway instead of near a commuter rail line. It costs me a fair amount to drive to work, including $300/month in parking. But it doesn't cost me nearly as much as it would to live on the near north side, because my townhouse costs 1/3 to 1/4 of the city (try getting 1700 sf, 2 car attached in Lincoln Park). I am fortunate that I have a job that lets me work a slightly flexible schedule (telework for an hour, drive in, work 9:30-6 at the office) in exchange for being on the road 7-9 days a month. I don't get all of the benefits of the city, but I'm also no longer in my 20s and chasing tail most nights.

That being said, I'm looking for a lower COL place for my retirement. Once my parents are gone, I have no need to live in a state like Illinois where my property taxes are considered low at 2% of market value, and I still have a 5% income tax and when I'm in the city the sales tax on restaurants is 10.5%! I have four major requirements, none of which would have been requirements when I finished graduate school 20 years ago:
- The same amount and quality of home space I have now, for 30% less per month
- Access within an hour by car to a similar level of medical care in the specialties which I need (emphasizes university towns with medical schools and teaching hospitals)
- Access to travel easily - near an Interstate, lots of cities within five hours by car, a serious airport within 100 miles; and
- Very few days under 40 degrees. I don't need the low 90s, but I don't mind them either. Over 96-97, however, and I start to take issue (ruling out much of Texas)

So about three years ago, I started researching in the wide triangle between Raleigh, Birmingham, and Nashville. I've pretty much ignored Atlanta, however. I have another five trips to the region planned for 2013, as it helps to have buckets of free flights, hotels, and one-way rental car days. Each day of each trip, I spend an hour or preferably two visiting neighborhoods in my price range to see how they live. By the end of 2013, I plan on narrowing my list down to two cities in the Carolinas and one along I-65.


Don't live in Nashville. Tornado alley. Was there a 4 years ago when that big Tornado wiped out a town.
Happens many times there...

HumDoHamaraDo said:   Once you move out of a high COL area, it is very hard to move back. You many not have the money, or everything would seem too expensive and could not justify moving back. Yet, real estate booms tend to happen more in high COL areas around the world.

Not just the booms, but the RE value crashes from 2005-2008 seem to have been concentrated in the high COL living areas as well. Yeah San Francisco was spared, but Miami, NJ, and plenty of other areas were not.

Not all of San Francisco was spared . The less desirable zip codes like 94124 94134 and 94112 saw declines of 50%+

Nashville's not bad although prices have gone up in the last few years. Good place to live as long as you buy into the idea of needing to drive everywhere, which is a common thread among all the cheap COL places.

lonestarguy said:   People do it all the time here in Central Texas. Here is a nice 4-bedroom outside Austin for $95,000: http://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/107-Wegstrom-St...

That is a horrible example. Yes, it's an inexpensive house but you are GUARANTEED to have foundation problems with the expansive clay soil in that area.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture Natural Resources Conservation Service has determined that most of the land in
Hutto is made up of the most expansive type of clay. According to the department, the soil is “very limited for building,”
with weaknesses that “generally cannot be overcome without major soil reclamation, special design, or expensive
installation procedures.” link

Now I'm ready to start my own thread. "Have you lived in small towns all your life and thought about moving to a tiny NYC apartment?"

cr3s said:   Don't live in Nashville. Tornado alley. Was there a 4 years ago when that big Tornado wiped out a town.
Happens many times there...
I have had clients in Nashville for over 15 years, and have probably spent 150 days there and put on about 3000 miles driving around the area. There's something that I just don't like about the city.

I have been thinking about moving to low COL area for a while, glad to see so many positive responses from different people.

I would like to move to Thailand, I have a few questions for all the FWF, first, a little bit of my background:

I'm 28 male, pro poker player, I have an Accounting degree but 0 experience. I'm a simple person, I have saved up about $400k, used $127k to buy a house in Columbus 4 days ago, in the process of renting it out, planning to buy 2 more, rent them out and move to Thailand to get a teaching job/retire, I will make about $1000/ month and another $2300/month from rental incomes, I have lived in Thailand for 2 months and I loved it!

Here are the pros and cons:
Pros:
Living expenses will go way down, which mean my purchasing power will go way up.(average Thai teacher salary is about $500/month)
I will have an amazing social life.
Stress from poker will disappear.
I will more likely to be a happier person.

Cons:
I will slowly lose my poker skills, which means I will not be able to compete and make more money in the future.
My future income will completely depends on rent growth and occupancy in Columbus, so far the area I'm investing in has been very healthy in both areas.
Because I have 0 experience in Accounting, my future opportunities will diminish when I'm 40, things dont work out and I have move back to the states.
I will slowly lose my language skill.
I will have to rely solely on my property manager to handle my investments, so far he seems to be a good pick(he is FWF type, has 8 properties himself and has a family to raise)
I wont have a pension, retirement account or social security benefits,

My question is should I move to Thailand?

By amazing social life, do you mean the abundance of young wonen who are willing to sleep with you thinking that you are their ticket out if there?

I think its rather sad.

I'm Asian myself, moved here when I was 16, I think I have accomplished more than the majority of the people in the last 12 years.
I enjoy living in Asia and I love Asian women, people in Asia are not as judgmental and close minded as some of the people in this country.

Responding to the negative questions will only give it too much credibility, so please approach the question with a logical mind and not focus on the little things.

HumDoHamaraDo said:   Once you move out of a high COL area, it is very hard to move back. You many not have the money, or everything would seem too expensive and could not justify moving back. Yet, real estate booms tend to happen more in high COL areas around the world.

That may be true if you don't save and invest the difference you have freed up by living in a lower cost of living area. I could afford to move back to DC area today if I had too and in fact I think there is a fairly good chance my wife and I might retire to a higher cost of living area than we live today (though we'd downsize our living arrangements). I don't see it as a one way street.

xceebeex said:   

You think Albany is a low cost of living? Compared to what? Albany is pretty high for housing. Then on top of that, there is the taxes which in NY state are pretty high wherever you go.


Yeah a relative of mine just retired from Albany to western Mass. and he was surprised how much taxes (particularly property taxes) were lower for him in Mass. than NY. Which is interesting since Mass. doesn't exactly have a low tax reputation.

secstate said:   xceebeex said:   

You think Albany is a low cost of living? Compared to what? Albany is pretty high for housing. Then on top of that, there is the taxes which in NY state are pretty high wherever you go.


Yeah a relative of mine just retired from Albany to western Mass. and he was surprised how much taxes (particularly property taxes) were lower for him in Mass. than NY. Which is interesting since Mass. doesn't exactly have a low tax reputation.


NY state certainly does not have a low tax reputation either

SUCKISSTAPLES said:   Once you get your head out of the sand and realize the world doesnt revolve around NYC SF LA Boston etc., you'll find the rest of the country is quite affordable . When I buy rentals , I look to these affordable areas.

A large population of the world will disagree with you.

I moved from a large northeastern metropolitan area to the southwest. It has been nothing but regret since then. Sure, the cost of living a lower, but I need a car. I have to pay for gas, insurance. Crime is MUCH higher (especially of the property kind) there are drunks, addicts and thugs everywhere, poverty is rampant, the education system is garbage, there is absolutely NOTHING to do here except outdoors stuff, and being single, social life is nonexistent - the percentage of professionals in their twenties and thirties is basically nonexistent.

Thankfully I am not stuck here, I can't wait to get back to a real city. Doesn't have to be huge, but the premise of this thread is false at best. You lose a LOT when you move from the city to the middle of nowhere (and yes,even cities with populations in the hundreds of thousands can be nowhere) - the benefits of a huge city are more than financial.

StudioTraffic said:   I have been thinking about moving to low COL area for a while, glad to see so many positive responses from different people.

I would like to move to Thailand, I have a few questions for all the FWF, first, a little bit of my background:

I'm 28 male, pro poker player, I have an Accounting degree but 0 experience. I'm a simple person, I have saved up about $400k, used $127k to buy a house in Columbus 4 days ago, in the process of renting it out, planning to buy 2 more, rent them out and move to Thailand to get a teaching job/retire, I will make about $1000/ month and another $2300/month from rental incomes, I have lived in Thailand for 2 months and I loved it!

Here are the pros and cons:
Pros:
Living expenses will go way down, which mean my purchasing power will go way up.(average Thai teacher salary is about $500/month)
I will have an amazing social life.
Stress from poker will disappear.
I will more likely to be a happier person.

Cons:
I will slowly lose my poker skills, which means I will not be able to compete and make more money in the future.
My future income will completely depends on rent growth and occupancy in Columbus, so far the area I'm investing in has been very healthy in both areas.
Because I have 0 experience in Accounting, my future opportunities will diminish when I'm 40, things dont work out and I have move back to the states.
I will slowly lose my language skill.
I will have to rely solely on my property manager to handle my investments, so far he seems to be a good pick(he is FWF type, has 8 properties himself and has a family to raise)
I wont have a pension, retirement account or social security benefits,

My question is should I move to Thailand?

Yes! I have contacts in Columbus and we are thinking of going to Thailand . We should talk. If you don't like it come back to Columbus . There's no need to pick the place and set it in stone forever.

MaxRC said:   By amazing social life, do you mean the abundance of young wonen who are willing to sleep with you thinking that you are their ticket out if there?

I think its rather sad.

Thai women don't want a ticket out of their country. That's the Filipina strategy.

SUCKISSTAPLES said:   StudioTraffic said:   I have been thinking about moving to low COL area for a while, glad to see so many positive responses from different people.

I would like to move to Thailand, I have a few questions for all the FWF, first, a little bit of my background:

I'm 28 male, pro poker player, I have an Accounting degree but 0 experience. I'm a simple person, I have saved up about $400k, used $127k to buy a house in Columbus 4 days ago, in the process of renting it out, planning to buy 2 more, rent them out and move to Thailand to get a teaching job/retire, I will make about $1000/ month and another $2300/month from rental incomes, I have lived in Thailand for 2 months and I loved it!

Here are the pros and cons:
Pros:
Living expenses will go way down, which mean my purchasing power will go way up.(average Thai teacher salary is about $500/month)
I will have an amazing social life.
Stress from poker will disappear.
I will more likely to be a happier person.

Cons:
I will slowly lose my poker skills, which means I will not be able to compete and make more money in the future.
My future income will completely depends on rent growth and occupancy in Columbus, so far the area I'm investing in has been very healthy in both areas.
Because I have 0 experience in Accounting, my future opportunities will diminish when I'm 40, things dont work out and I have move back to the states.
I will slowly lose my language skill.
I will have to rely solely on my property manager to handle my investments, so far he seems to be a good pick(he is FWF type, has 8 properties himself and has a family to raise)
I wont have a pension, retirement account or social security benefits,

My question is should I move to Thailand?

Yes! I have contacts in Columbus and we are thinking of going to Thailand . We should talk. If you don't like it come back to Columbus . There's no need to pick the place and set it in stone forever.


Thanks, glad to hear that!
PM sent!

madcowdisease said:   I moved from a large northeastern metropolitan area to the southwest. It has been nothing but regret since then. Sure, the cost of living a lower, but I need a car. I have to pay for gas, insurance. Crime is MUCH higher (especially of the property kind) there are drunks, addicts and thugs everywhere, poverty is rampant, the education system is garbage, there is absolutely NOTHING to do here except outdoors stuff, and being single, social life is nonexistent - the percentage of professionals in their twenties and thirties is basically nonexistent.

Thankfully I am not stuck here, I can't wait to get back to a real city. Doesn't have to be huge, but the premise of this thread is false at best. You lose a LOT when you move from the city to the middle of nowhere (and yes,even cities with populations in the hundreds of thousands can be nowhere) - the benefits of a huge city are more than financial.


One place in the southwest doesn't mean all low cost of living areas are the same in the U.S. There are plenty of lower cost of living cities with young professionals, night life and good education systems. That said if you really love where you live then you probably should stay there. You are certainly not describing my low cost of living location (other than the fact you do "need" a car but that can be done cheap too). I spend less on my car and gas than my co-workers in NY (I am a remote employee) spend on mass transit. That said I do agree there are many benefits to living in a large city such as NYC or SF that are frequently under estimated by those who live in a smaller city. That said there are also great variations in the cost of living of large cities too.

jaytrader said:   SUCKISSTAPLES said:   Once you get your head out of the sand and realize the world doesnt revolve around NYC SF LA Boston etc., you'll find the rest of the country is quite affordable . When I buy rentals , I look to these affordable areas.

A large population of the world will disagree with you.


So what and when did you get points on fatwallet for following the herd? There are in fact many benefits to living in a major high cost of living city but that doesn't not make alternative choices any less valid either as some folks don't need or desire those benefits.

There are also plenty of places in large 'northeastern metropolitan area' with very high crime; drunks, addicts and thugs everywhere, rampant poverty, etc...

I will grant you can't beat the Museums and Shows to be had in a place like NYC however!

TravelerMSY said:   Now I'm ready to start my own thread. "Have you lived in small towns all your life and thought about moving to a tiny NYC apartment?"
Pretty much every time I visit.

Me too, Simmias. However I have come to the realization that I'm better off just visiting frequently and staying in a hotel. Once you need a high-powered job to finance the NYC apartment, the honeymoon's over. The sweet spot is just visiting frequently via miles/points FW tactics.

I'm moving to Auburn CA from Bay Area CA. I will not have a mortgage, we will have a bigger house, and we will not have to pay stable fees for our horses. It will save us around $2500/month every month for 30 years. Thats about a million dollars. We will still be in northern Ca. and in a community with restaurants and other big city stuff we like. The only downside is leaving friends, but thats why we are paying a little more to stay in northern ca, a 3 hour drive from our old life.

As silly as it may seem I purchased a home about two years ago just near the border of Scottsdale but within Phoenix city limits. Quite literally similar floor plans from similar construction periods were regularly going for 30% higher less than three blocks from me... We even have the Scottsdale mailing address...which seems to matter to some people.

School districts can cause disparities in pricing like that, Dawgswin.

JTausTX said:   RedWolfe01 said:   

There are nice places all over, its just what you want in particular. I live in a Condo in Dallas that is around that 100K price point -- but property taxes are high here. I can walk to the Dallas Arts district as well as two different "bar" districts. I can bike to 3 others as well as a great coffee shop. The only issue here is size, its small. The work that I do now *could* be telecommuted but most employer/contracts want you working from the office. (and those are 20-35 minute commutes -- last two jobs were/are in the suburbs and not downtown.

I really hate commutes, but not really wanting to live in the 'burbs either. (see: likes to walk to entertainment, above)


Where in Dallas do you live? I wouldn't have thought that anyplace within walking distance to the Arts district and the two bar districts (which I'm assuming must be Uptown and maybe Deep Ellum, or maybe Cedar Springs) would have condos for $100k. A friend of mine bought a nice condo just off Wycliff St, a block away from Cedar Springs, and it was IIRC in the $200-300k range.


I live right next to Deep Ellum station, 700-800 sq ft for the small units. I can acutally see the arts district from my window over the highway.

StudioTraffic said:   I'm Asian myself, moved here when I was 16, I think I have accomplished more than the majority of the people in the last 12 years.So what are you saying, that you are above average?

I enjoy living in Asia and I love Asian women, people in Asia are not as judgmental and close minded as some of the people in this country. I disagree with this assessment. Women in under-developed/developing (compared to first world countries) Asian countries are far more opportunistic in my experience. The traditional female role in a relationship in these countries are much more dependent and subservient to the male role. Women in these countries will do what it takes to secure a better life and are subject to an alarming amount of exploitation by those who prey on this weakness.



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