Northwestern Mutual interview

Archived From: Finance
  • Go to page :
  • 1 2
  • Text Only
Voting History
rated:
I have an interview with Northwestern Mutual coming up soon. I have read a lot of things about them, both good and bad. From reading it looks like a 100% commission job, buy glassdoor.com says salary plus commission. Guess I will find out during the interview. I would imagine that it is up to me to supply any and all leads for business. I understand that this will be a tough job, but could be lucrative of I can stick with it and be successful. If this was you interviewing, what questions would be top priority for you to ask?

Member Summary
Most Recent Posts
It is illegal if they are not insurance licensed. It is unethical if it isn't disclosed to the clients. It is also jus... (more)

BrodyInsurance (Dec. 04, 2012 @ 6:40p) |

A few friends of friends did the NM thing... was so annoying to get sales calls on my cell phone from people I met drunk... (more)

bigmarley4 (Dec. 04, 2012 @ 8:31p) |

Our first thought when someone calls us is, "Why is this person calling me?" This is true even when it is a good friend... (more)

BrodyInsurance (Dec. 05, 2012 @ 6:03a) |


From the people who have posted on FWF about it before, its a mix between cold calling and calling your family members and harassing them to buy insurance products. Its just a sales job - if you are good in sales, you can do far better.

It is 100% commission, but there may be a small draw or salary in the very beginning. It will be very tough. Most people fail. If you get hired and do what needs to be done on a daily basis, you will succeed. Most fail because they can't do what needs to be done.

One quickly runs out of friends and family to call. Whether one sells to F&F is immaterial to their success. What is very material is whether they can get F&F to refer them to others. It's too hard to succeed with cold calling. One must be able to use their F&F to turn their business into a referral business.

Northwestern Mutual (NML) is a great company, but that doesn't mean that they are a good fit for you as a salesperson and that doesn't mean that their products will be the best for your clients.

Do not take a job with them without also talking to local agencies for Guardian, MassMutual, and NY Life.

I started with NML and I'm glad that I did. I left NML and I'm glad that I did.

BrodyInsurance said:   It is 100% commission, but there may be a small draw or salary in the very beginning. It will be very tough. Most people fail. If you get hired and do what needs to be done on a daily basis, you will succeed. Most fail because they can't do what needs to be done.

One quickly runs out of friends and family to call. Whether one sells to F&F is immaterial to their success. What is very material is whether they can get F&F to refer them to others. It's too hard to succeed with cold calling. One must be able to use their F&F to turn their business into a referral business.

Northwestern Mutual (NML) is a great company, but that doesn't mean that they are a good fit for you as a salesperson and that doesn't mean that their products will be the best for your clients.

Do not take a job with them without also talking to local agencies for Guardian, MassMutual, and NY Life.

I started with NML and I'm glad that I did. I left NML and I'm glad that I did.


Can you tell me why you are glad you started then left there? PM is ok too.

It is a difficult business. When someone starts, it is near impossible to succeed without the backing of a good company and a good agency. NML is a very strong company with excellent training depending upon the agency.

I read boards like this one and Bogleheads and many people give the impression that insurance agents just care about making sales and earning as much money as possible. I read about how it is just about selling expensive insurance products, etc. Yet, if that is what I witnessed, I would have quit almost instantly. Instead, I was surrounded by agents and a management team that actually did care about helping the client.

I left because I no longer needed a strong agency behind me. I wanted to be in a position in which I could always do what is best for my client and not have to worry about a specific insurance company.

Most critical thing for success is having a network of centers of influence. Accountants and lawyers tend to be great sources of referrals, simply because their clients generally follow their recommendations. If they refer a client to you for insurance, you go in with a seal of approval from their trusted advisor. You can also create business opportunities through those accountants and lawyers. For example, you can tell your CPA about a great solution or concept, and ask which of his clients might benefit. He may not know "someone looking for insurance", but he will have some clients for your idea. It's not just accountants and lawyers. Anyone with the ear or trust of others is a center of influence and potential source of referrals. Having these sources is critical for long term success in this business.

It is very difficult. But, if successful, it is very lucrative. Successful experienced agents have very high incomes, enjoy great lifestyles, and control their own day to day activities. It often takes many years to become an overnight success.

RBirns said:   It is very difficult. But, if successful, it is very lucrative. Successful experienced agents have very high incomes, enjoy great lifestyles, and control their own day to day activities. It often takes many years to become an overnight success.I've always been curious: how much do successful life insurance agents make?

Most critical thing for success is having a network of centers of influence. Accountants and lawyers tend to be great sources of referrals,

Absolutely. They are the only people who I proactively call. The key to having an accountant or lawyer be a good center of influence is to turn them into a personal client.

geo123 said:   RBirns said:   It is very difficult. But, if successful, it is very lucrative. Successful experienced agents have very high incomes, enjoy great lifestyles, and control their own day to day activities. It often takes many years to become an overnight success.I've always been curious: how much do successful life insurance agents make?

There are some superstar agents who sell more insurance than many companies, and those agents make tens of millions, but those aren't the ones who you are talking about.

As a good guess, the last agency with which I had an association with probably had 6 guys making $500,000+

Considering the commission on a WL policy can be $10k or more , $500k for a superstar agent seems easily doable - it's just 50 large WL policies

Agents who hold those "living trust seminars " seem to get at least 2-3 sales out of a room of people

SUCKISSTAPLES said:   Considering the commission on a WL policy can be $10k or more , $500k for a superstar agent seems easily doable - it's just 50 large WL policies

Agents who hold those "living trust seminars " seem to get at least 2-3 sales out of a room of people


One thing that I found interesting was the varied ways in which people were making their money.

I interviewed with them when I graduated college just to see what it is all about. If you tell them you have a large network of friends and family in the area, you'll be hired on. I get the feeling they'll hire just about anyone. You'll be selling overpriced insurance and investment products to financially illiterate people, most of whom are your friends and family.

I knew it wasn't a good fit for me- I subscribe to the Boglehead philosophy and did at the time- I wouldn't be able to sell their products with good conscience.

They'll hire anyone who they think has a legitimate chance to succeed. If a person doesn't have some sort of natural network, they have very little chance to succeed. If a person doesn't have good people skills, they have very little chance to succeed. If a person doesn't have a good work ethic, they have very little chance to succeed. If someone has all three, they most likely will get hired. The odds are still against success.

You won't be selling overpriced insurance products to financially illiterate people if you are trying to succeed in the business. The NML target market is just the opposite of the that. Successful life insurance agents tend to be successful because of their ability to work with people who are financially successful. The target market for NML is attorneys, CPAs, doctors, business owners, and executives.

Their insurance products are not overpriced. Their term insurance (for non-smokers) is more expensive than other carriers. This is because of the ability to convert it to their whole life insurance without evidence of insurability. This makes it inappropriate for those who don't care about this feature, but if a person wants this feature, it is not overpriced.

There is nothing about the Boglehead philosophy that would prevent a person from using Northwestern Mutual. Certain voices just drowned out others. In fact, the Boglehead philosophy should be very favorable towards using a mutual company.

BrodyInsurance said:   geo123 said:   RBirns said:   It is very difficult. But, if successful, it is very lucrative. Successful experienced agents have very high incomes, enjoy great lifestyles, and control their own day to day activities. It often takes many years to become an overnight success.I've always been curious: how much do successful life insurance agents make?

There are some superstar agents who sell more insurance than many companies, and those agents make tens of millions, but those aren't the ones who you are talking about.

As a good guess, the last agency with which I had an association with probably had 6 guys making $500,000+
What about non-superstars? How much would a reasonably successful non-superstar agent make?

Dp

I'd imagine the incomes mimic a mlm structure and how a small number do well while most make nothing or less than minimum wage

SUCKISSTAPLES said:   I'd imagine the incomes mimic a mlm structure and how a small number do well while most make nothing or less than minimum wageThat was my impression as well. My understanding is that the vast majority of life insurance agents make peanuts and don't last in the industry and that even the reasonably successful non-superstar ones don't make all that much (as in lower 6 figures after they've been in business for 20 years).

Obviously, most people fail out of the business. If we go back to my last agency, we probably had 6 guys making $500,000 + and another 6 making $250,000+. I would guess that there were another 10 who were making $100,000+.

This is out of 70 career agents. Of the remaining 50, probably 40 of these guys were too young in their career to make a decent living even if ultimately they would end up successful. Of those 40, probably 35 will probably fail out.

I did an internship there 7 years ago. I actually created my FW account around the time of doing it, hence the username.

The internship basically mimics the actual job of being a "Financial Representative". It required me to do a 1 week sales training and then work alongside a seasoned representative to peddle products. Basically my day was to call up several individuals I know and say something along the lines of "Hi ____, this is ____, I'm currently working for a NMFN and was hoping you had some time to meet up to tell you a little about what I do." I had to set 5 appointments a week, in the hopes that 2-3 will actually follow through and 1 will buy.

First off, most of the people in my network know that I don't talk that way. They know I'm a straight shooter and would cut the BS and get to the point of why I'm calling which made these calls very uncomfortable for me.

Second, most of the people in my network were 20-30 and didn't need life insurance. It got to the point of me calling them and just telling them "Hey, I'm doing this internship where I need friends and family listen to a guy try and sell them life insurance for an hour. Can you come out and meet up so that I hit my appointment quota and I'll buy you lunch?"

Third, the high commissions are only on whole life policies and variable universal life policies, somewhere around 50%. The rest of the products such as term life and disability insurance would not result in a large enough check to pay for groceries for that week. Since my network was on the younger end of the spectrum, the latter two products were the only ones worth it to them.

To be successful, you have to already have a network of a few high net worth individuals that will refer you to their rich friends. Once you start that gravy train, you can do really well since you make residual commissions upon each renewal. There were several guys that had large books of business built out that were basically cash cows. Some of them presented to us at the sales training and told us that they were about to go on their 6th vacation of the year and never miss their kids soccer games. They were talking about how you can make Ibanking income without the lifestyle sacrifice. It all sounds appealing, but these types of results are few and far between. Quite a few of the interns quit before it was officially over.

The reason I went through with it was to basically get a known company on my resume prior to graduation. It helped me get my full time position elsewhere upon graduation so it served its purpose for me.

The internship mimics the job, but it is very different because it is the type of career in which one can only be successful if they are willing to be overworked and underpaid in the beginning.

When one is doing it as an intern, they typically have too few appointments to ever figure out what they are doing, so they only make money if they get lucky with a friend or relative.

As for your points, if you weren't comfortable talking that way, you should tailor the phone call to a way in which you were comfortable.

People in their 20's do buy life insurance and disability insurance. If they didn't buy it from you, they eventually purchased it from someone. If the focus is building a career, it is actually irrelevant whether someone buys from you when you first meet them.

For a first year NML agent, the commissions are higher than 80% for whole life. NML isn't in the VUL market. They sold VL. Regardless, one can make a decent buck on term insurance and DI. The typical DI policy should result in a $700+ commission. That's a lot of groceries for a young single guy to eat in a week.

Here's the secret to being successful from the very beginning as an NML (or similar company) salesperson:

Accept the fact that you will suck at what you are doing. Turn yourself into an appointment setter. Call quality people and bring along someone more experienced. Shut up at the meetings and let the experienced person talk. Split the business 50/50. 50% of something is far superior than 0% of nothing. Unlike the investment business, insurance agents don't need individuals to have a high net worth. They only need someone with positive cash flow.

As an example, the young attorney making $90,000 is a great prospect for an insurance agent, but is terrible for an investment advisor.

There was a prior thread about this company, but the posts here all hit it on the head.

I interviewed for an internship position back in college. The interview was very strange as she was talking as if i was going to get the offer regardless of what i said. Seemed like they just wanted me for my contacts - which seems accurate based off of the earlier posts.

Best of luck during your interview

Aagiants said:   There was a prior thread about this company, but the posts here all hit it on the head.

I interviewed for an internship position back in college. The interview was very strange as she was talking as if i was going to get the offer regardless of what i said. Seemed like they just wanted me for my contacts - which seems accurate based off of the earlier posts.

Best of luck during your interview


This is close, but not quite right. They don't want you for your contacts because your contacts are worthless without you. Your contacts are needed because without good contacts, you have very little chance to succeed. It makes no sense to hire people who can't succeed. By the way, your ability to sell to your contacts has very little relevance as to your chance to succeed or not. On the other hand, your ability to get referrals from your contacts has very much to do with your ultimate success or failure.

There is something that I need to make clear because it is probably easy to read this thread and think that I'm positively pushing in favor of Northwestern Mutual. That actually isn't the case. I do think that they are a good company, but the local agency is much more important than the actual company. This job is not appropriate for most people and nobody should take a job with any of the big mutual companies without also interviewing with their competition.

BrodyInsurance said:   The internship mimics the job, but it is very different because it is the type of career in which one can only be successful if they are willing to be overworked and underpaid in the beginning.

When one is doing it as an intern, they typically have too few appointments to ever figure out what they are doing, so they only make money if they get lucky with a friend or relative.

As for your points, if you weren't comfortable talking that way, you should tailor the phone call to a way in which you were comfortable.

People in their 20's do buy life insurance and disability insurance. If they didn't buy it from you, they eventually purchased it from someone. If the focus is building a career, it is actually irrelevant whether someone buys from you when you first meet them.

For a first year NML agent, the commissions are higher than 80% for whole life. NML isn't in the VUL market. They sold VL. Regardless, one can make a decent buck on term insurance and DI. The typical DI policy should result in a $700+ commission. That's a lot of groceries for a young single guy to eat in a week.

Here's the secret to being successful from the very beginning as an NML (or similar company) salesperson:

Accept the fact that you will suck at what you are doing. Turn yourself into an appointment setter. Call quality people and bring along someone more experienced. Shut up at the meetings and let the experienced person talk. Split the business 50/50. 50% of something is far superior than 0% of nothing. Unlike the investment business, insurance agents don't need individuals to have a high net worth. They only need someone with positive cash flow.

As an example, the young attorney making $90,000 is a great prospect for an insurance agent, but is terrible for an investment advisor.


I did end up changing the script, which is how I ended up getting appointments. The problem is that when I would call people the conversation would go like this: "Hey Bob, this is Bill, I hope everything is going well", "Holy $%#@ Bob I haven't talked to you in forever, whats going on?", "Well I just got a new job and was wondering if you had some time to grab lunch and talk"

They went in with expectations of catching up about old times and my financial representative went in trying to sell them something. I never quite nailed the best way to set the appointment.

You are correct about the commissions and VUL, I couldn't quite remember the specifics. However I did sell 1 term life policy and 1 disability policy. The term life was an $800 paycheck and the DI was $200. Since all of my contacts were 20 to 30, they all had student loans, and made between 30-60k at the time. Most were barely participating in their 401ks let alone having money to put into an "investment" such as whole life. My financial rep would still try to sell it to them regardless, which made things very uncomfortable for me and the person I invited to the meeting. Every meeting I set, I had a seasoned rep come with me and split the business 50/50.

The secret is to get enough referrals far enough out of your own network that you have no emotional involvement in what you're selling and who you're selling it to. I could not make this moral sacrifice and therefore I was doomed to fail from the start.

"Hey Bob, this is Bill, I hope everything is going well", "Holy $%#@ Bob I haven't talked to you in forever, whats going on?", "Well I just got a new job and was wondering if you had some time to grab lunch and talk"

They went in with expectations of catching up about old times and my financial representative went in trying to sell them something. I never quite nailed the best way to set the appointment.


You are bringing up a great point and is one of the major problems that people have when dealing with friends and family.

This is something that I learned early in my career and it carries over to this day. Ultimately, most of my friends have become clients and many of my clients have become friends. EVERY time that I am calling a friend or family member for business purposes, the first words out of my mouth are, "Hello Friend, this is a business call."

I never transition from personal stuff to business. It is always business stuff first. I never want a friend to be thinking in the back of his mind, "Brody Insurance never calls just to chat. What does he really want."

My advice to a newby would be to do friend and family (F&F) appointments on their own. The purpose is not to sell. The purpose of a F&F appointment is twofold.
1)Come across professionally so that in a few years when you aren't a rookie, you can get their business.
2)Get referrals! It is these referrals that will allow you to make money. Let a senior agent sell to these people.

I've had friends go down the financial advisor/insurance sales route. They lost all their friends because they were no longer able to just be friends. It turned into "hey we need to catch up" which always leads to a sales pitch and then when you repeatedly shut then down "which of your coworkers or family members can I talk to?"

I gave a sympathy look at some of the financial products one was selling. Mutual funds with 2%+ expense ratios. Disgusting, but this guy wasn't bright enough to know how much he was screwing people.

Whole life insurance is as big of a scam. I have no respect for anyone who pushes it.

BrodyInsurance said:   

This is something that I learned early in my career and it carries over to this day. Ultimately, most of my friends have become clients and many of my clients have become friends. EVERY time that I am calling a friend or family member for business purposes, the first words out of my mouth are, "Hello Friend, this is a business call."

I never transition from personal stuff to business. It is always business stuff first. I never want a friend to be thinking in the back of his mind, "Brody Insurance never calls just to chat. What does he really want."



All young professionals should learn this immediately. One of the most important things to know.

I am both friends and clients of a lot of different people. It is very important the other person knows which hat you are wearing for this conversation.

Kevo171 said:   I've had friends go down the financial advisor/insurance sales route. They lost all their friends because they were no longer able to just be friends. It turned into "hey we need to catch up" which always leads to a sales pitch and then when you repeatedly shut then down "which of your coworkers or family members can I talk to?"

I gave a sympathy look at some of the financial products one was selling. Mutual funds with 2%+ expense ratios. Disgusting, but this guy wasn't bright enough to know how much he was screwing people.

Whole life insurance is as big of a scam. I have no respect for anyone who pushes it.



Here are some questions for Kevo only. If whole life is a scam, why do banks and corporations purchase so much of it? If it is a scam, how does a company, like NML, thrive when their target market is the financially sophisticated? Why are my best clients and biggest source of referrals attorneys who specialize in estate planning?

There is no question that it is often sold/purchased when it shouldn't be. That is an indictment against unscrupulous agents, but not against the product.

My experience is that people who think that whole life is the greatest thing ever AND people who think that it is a scam have one thing in common. They are both ignorant of how the product truly works and when it is or is not appropriate. They both tend to fit into the, "a little knowledge is dangerous" category.

thats not gonna fly. if you want to have a personal conversation with him then PM him. Otherwise others like myself are going to step in. The reason you put those comments on this site is bc you dont like it when people point out the reality of what happens to most whole life policies. Im sure you do a fine job but its really not that much of a stretch to say at least most people are scammed into whole life.

Whole life companies thrive bc they have a very safe model. They invest in treasuries and bonds primarily and only occasionally pay a death benefit b/c the vast majority of all permanent policies either lapse or are surrendered. They take in tons of money and pay very little out. It doesnt matter why banks purchase it. They cant even get home loans correct so who cares.

When the product fails to produce even a permanent death benefit over 80% of the time (which really is its primary intention and only good reason to purchase it is a need for a permanent death benefit), i think people can say its a bad product. The majority of people who purchase whole life lose money especially when you consider inflation. I have plenty of knowledge on whole life. Much more than the typical agent who actually is the person who is the most dangerous.

dhodson, step in all that you'd like. It doesn't change the fact that if he is going to call something a scam, he should have enough knowledge to back up what he's saying.

you actually dont know that he doesnt....you want to try to prove he has less than you so you can make his opinion look less valuable. Scam might be too hard of a word for how it is routinely sold but not by much.

I know nothing of his knowledge level which is why I am asking the question. I do know that my personal experience has been that people who refer to it as a scam tend to not know much about the subject. Hopefully, he will be an exception and can speak intelligently enough to back up his viewpoint.

dhodson said:   thats not gonna fly. if you want to have a personal conversation with him then PM him. Otherwise others like myself are going to step in. The reason you put those comments on this site is bc you dont like it when people point out the reality of what happens to most whole life policies. Im sure you do a fine job but its really not that much of a stretch to say at least most people are scammed into whole life.

Whole life companies thrive bc they have a very safe model. They invest in treasuries and bonds primarily and only occasionally pay a death benefit b/c the vast majority of all permanent policies either lapse or are surrendered. They take in tons of money and pay very little out. It doesnt matter why banks purchase it. They cant even get home loans correct so who cares.

When the product fails to produce even a permanent death benefit over 80% of the time (which really is its primary intention and only good reason to purchase it is a need for a permanent death benefit), i think people can say its a bad product. The majority of people who purchase whole life lose money especially when you consider inflation. I have plenty of knowledge on whole life. Much more than the typical agent who actually is the person who is the most dangerous.


Given the facts you stated, wouldn't investing in some of these companies, (e.g., met, prudential) be a wise choice?

dup

Do you mean in their stocks for the non mutuals?

BrodyInsurance said:   Kevo171 said:   I've had friends go down the financial advisor/insurance sales route. They lost all their friends because they were no longer able to just be friends. It turned into "hey we need to catch up" which always leads to a sales pitch and then when you repeatedly shut then down "which of your coworkers or family members can I talk to?"

I gave a sympathy look at some of the financial products one was selling. Mutual funds with 2%+ expense ratios. Disgusting, but this guy wasn't bright enough to know how much he was screwing people.

Whole life insurance is as big of a scam. I have no respect for anyone who pushes it.



Here are some questions for Kevo only. If whole life is a scam, why do banks and corporations purchase so much of it? If it is a scam, how does a company, like NML, thrive when their target market is the financially sophisticated? Why are my best clients and biggest source of referrals attorneys who specialize in estate planning?

There is no question that it is often sold/purchased when it shouldn't be. That is an indictment against unscrupulous agents, but not against the product.

My experience is that people who think that whole life is the greatest thing ever AND people who think that it is a scam have one thing in common. They are both ignorant of how the product truly works and when it is or is not appropriate. They both tend to fit into the, "a little knowledge is dangerous" category.


Brody you state most of your business comes from attorneys referring their estate planning clients - so presumably these older wealthier clients are the proper market to be buying WL.

Yet these insurance interviews are saying to round up your friends and family so we can pitch to them (these people are likely NOT the proper buyers of WL, but are having it "hard sold" to them under the guise of helping get the friend /family members career started as an agent ). Precisely the wrong group and wrong way to sell insurance to

dhodson said:   Do you mean in their stocks for the non mutuals?

Yes

Brody you state most of your business comes from attorneys referring their estate planning clients - so presumably these older wealthier clients are the proper market to be buying WL.

Let me try to clarify some of this which has nothing to do with your main point. It is not accurate to say that the majority of my business comes from attorneys referring their estate planning clients. What is accurate is that every year approximately 90% of my business comes from a combination of these 5 places. 1)Attorneys 2)CPAs 3)Referrals from attorneys 4)Referrals from CPAs 5)Business owners

If I'm picking up the phone to cold call someone, it is an attorney or CPA who I am calling. If I have time between appointments, I walk in to businesses and try to introduce myself to the owner. One of the things that I learned is that there are only a few ways to get referrals from attorneys/CPAs: 1)Make them your personal client 2)Use them as your attorney/CPA 3)Send them business. Since I only have the need for one attorney and one CPA and I can only send business to a handful of them, my efforts are spent making them personal clients.

We also need to redefine what you are calling "estate planning". Too often, we think of estate planning as something that only is done by wealthy individuals, but attorneys in the field will tell you that simple wills and basic planning is part of estate planning and is something that is needed by most adults. To put it another way, estate planning is about much more than just federal estate taxes. Also, with many states decoupling the federal estate taxes from state estate taxes, it may only take $1,000,000 until taxes become an issue. Having over $1,000,000 at death including real estate and insurance doesn't make anybody wealthy.

Attorneys/CPAs send business my way because they know that I'll recommend what is in the client's best interest. It often is not whole life.

Yet these insurance interviews are saying to round up your friends and family so we can pitch to them (these people are likely NOT the proper buyers of WL, but are having it "hard sold" to them under the guise of helping get the friend /family members career started as an agent ). Precisely the wrong group and wrong way to sell insurance to

Let's use Jim, Jack, and Charlie as examples of new agents. All three of them have 100 people who know them who would agree to meet with them.

Jim meets with them and does really well for a new guy with selling them insurance. He turns 10 of them into clients and makes a couple pretty nice sales and earns $30,000 in commissions. He gets referrals from the people who become clients and gets 25 total referrals.

Jack meets with them and sells very little insurance. He only sells 3 policies and earns $800. His focus is on getting referrals and turns these 100 meetings into 500 referrals.

Charlie doesn't want to call his friends and families and tries to get started by cold calling.

End result:
Jim is out of the business by the end of his first year.
Jack is on his way to a great career.
Charlie is out of the business by the end of his second month.

As for all of the sales that Jack didn't make, he'll make them eventually. He'll sell them term insurance, disability insurance, and some whole life insurance, but not until after he figures out what he is doing and after his friends have a need and after his friends understand that this isn't just a new job for him, but a serious career.

The F&F is about getting referrals and learning how to do the job. It is not about selling to F&F. If it is, it isn't a good agency.

Skipping 40 Messages...
bigmarley4 said:   A few friends of friends did the NM thing... was so annoying to get sales calls on my cell phone from people I met drunk at a party once, acting like my best friend and trying to sell me crap they didn't even understand. If you do go to that firm please don't be this obnoxious.

bigM

ps-they all failed out in 9-12 months and are working crap jobs now.

edit: I totally forgot I actually interviewed there when I was finishing college. The recruiter was pretty creepy, calling me long after I declined to work there to ask how I was doing in my job, etc...


Our first thought when someone calls us is, "Why is this person calling me?" This is true even when it is a good friend. Guys almost never call just to chat. That is why it bothers us when some salesman calls and starts chit chatting. For that reason, I firmly believe that the first words of the conversation to friends and acquaintances need to be, "This is a business call." Non-business calls should never be turned into business calls.

bigM, am I correct that although you, like most people don't like to be called, the bigger problem was that you got contacted in an unprofessional manner?



Disclaimer: By providing links to other sites, FatWallet.com does not guarantee, approve or endorse the information or products available at these sites, nor does a link indicate any association with or endorsement by the linked site to FatWallet.com.

Thanks for visiting FatWallet.com. Join for free to remove this ad.

TRUSTe online privacy certification

While FatWallet makes every effort to post correct information, offers are subject to change without notice.
Some exclusions may apply based upon merchant policies.
© 1999-2014