• Page :
  • 1
  • Text Only
A career change is harder than it looks. You almost have to lose your current job to make it worthwhile.

malasv said:   I have been programming in java/unix/oracle/app servers/middleware last 13 years and now I don't want to do it anymore . I want to start a new career in ERP implementation preferably in SAP or Oracle apps initially as technical person and later as functional . Has anyone done it . I may have to start at a lower level to begin with . what are the potential risks . Anyone in IT would like to add any comments ? . I see rapid growth as ERP consultant as compared to programmer / architect .

Do you travel a lot with your current job? Any product specialty usually requires traveling, unless you live in a very large metropolitan area with many large companies implementing ERP packages.

It is a potentially higher paying job than your garden variety developer, but I would not consider it more interesting. Just different set of challenges. With your background, you should be able to handle the technical side. The challenge is getting training. It is very expensive. At your level, you probably are getting decent salary. You'd have to join a consulting company, probably at a lower salary, with an explicit expectation of being a part of SAP/Oracle practice and getting in-class or on the job training.

Are you ready to travel 100% of time? Then move into consulting with ERP cosulting BIG5's else, its better to stick to programming in JAVA etc....another thing, there are too many folks form India that can do anything under the sun!(not sure how though ) If you have any other special skills list them..if your heart likes to something that you love.. think about that... just saying..

cognoscube said:   another thing, there are too many folks form India that can do anything under the sun!(not sure how though )

As with anything, it depends. In my module (HR), a lot of times companies don't want outsourced work directly because they either can't communicate well with the outsourced team, or have had previous sour grapes experience with outsourced work. If you are good at what you do, there will always be companies that are willing to pay decent rates. If not, there are companies that are willing to go the outsourcing route.

Al3xK said:   With a Java background, I would probably stay away from SAP...have you ever seen ABAP? Oracle sounds Java like so that'd make sense. Never seen what you work with in JD Edwards. Dynamics AX is C#/Java like and is a RAD language you could pick up.

ABAP is a breeze to learn. Only took me a couple months doing part time work my last semester in college.

malasv said:   how do i start out as functional consultant when i do not have any functional knowledge . I guess try something in FI/CO or SD or CRM .

When I first started working with SAP, I would do exactly what was asked of me, technically. Since I wasn't too familiar with it, took pretty much all my time to just get that done. Once I started getting more of the hang of it, then I would investigate why something was being done a certain way, which would usually lead to me getting some insight on the functional need for X Y or Z. While it probably isn't the most efficient way, seems like starting off from a technical perspective and moving into functional once your knowledge is firmed up is something to look into.

malasv said:   I am learning bi / bw / hana in sap to begin with since it does not need domain expertise . I am unable to keep up with fast changing pace of java/cloud/mobile that is why I want to get out of programming
That is ironic because both Oracle and SAP are undergoing major changes as far as I can see. And any IT job that can be standardized would be at risk of potentially being outsourced.
Being in IT myself I feel the pressure every day to keep up with all the changes, too. But I see that having those changes is one of the key reasons we still have jobs.
This actually makes changing career to a different IT area difficult---unless to very closely related areas.
Because you will have to learn not only what others in the new area already know but also the new things.
In this case you will very likely have to take a pay cut in order to get in. I know people who have made such changes that did have to start with a lower salary.
I'm honestly not sure if it's worth it unless for people who are working with declining technologies.

cognoscube said:   Are you ready to travel 100% of time? Then move into consulting with ERP cosulting BIG5's else, its better to stick to programming in JAVA etc....another thing, there are too many folks form India that can do anything under the sun!(not sure how though ) If you have any other special skills list them..if your heart likes to something that you love.. think about that... just saying..

Just so you know, the OP seems to be an Indian.... so he already has that head start :-p

pthor1231 said:   cognoscube said:   another thing, there are too many folks form India that can do anything under the sun!(not sure how though )

As with anything, it depends. In my module (HR), a lot of times companies don't want outsourced work directly because they either can't communicate well with the outsourced team, or have had previous sour grapes experience with outsourced work. If you are good at what you do, there will always be companies that are willing to pay decent rates. If not, there are companies that are willing to go the outsourcing route.



This is very true, my old company offshored a lot of their remotable skillsets. They promply lost almost all the support contracts with their largest customer over the next year. Their third largest customer isn't that happy with the support from Mexico and India. (I am working for them indirectly providing backup support for the third largest at the moment)

Most good consulting firms do offer you the ability to move around in domain/expertise etc. If you are able to join one of them (Big4, Accenture, bunch of niche consulting firms, may be even IBM/Accenture), and pay your dues, i.e. work with them for a year or so in an area you are an expert at - then there are good chances you may be able to switch to another area.

Some firms are more uptight about these types of mobility and some others are not, so you need to do your research.

Please make sure you want to switch for the right reason though. If you spend 5 years catching up on a new technology, and discover you have the same problem as before - that's not a good place to be.



Disclaimer: By providing links to other sites, FatWallet.com does not guarantee, approve or endorse the information or products available at these sites, nor does a link indicate any association with or endorsement by the linked site to FatWallet.com.

Thanks for visiting FatWallet.com. Join for free to remove this ad.

TRUSTe online privacy certification

While FatWallet makes every effort to post correct information, offers are subject to change without notice.
Some exclusions may apply based upon merchant policies.
© 1999-2014