• Go to page :
  • 1 2 34
  • Text Only
Gender: Male

Age: 30

Location: Texas

Occupation: Technical Sales Manager for a software company

Education: B.A. in Economics + IT certifications

2012 Compensation: $190K ($120K base + ~$70K in commission)

Future Salary Projection: $225K ($140K base + ~$85k in commission) if sales go well next year, which I imagine they will.

Benefits: Full medical, 401k, employee stock purchase plan, 3 weeks vacation + 2 weeks holiday, time off for volunteering, free food & drink.

What's the job like?
I manage a team of ~10 people (depending on the month) and help them figure out how to best sell our products and support our customers. My job is a LOT of meetings and a lot of dealing in a "matrixed organization" - AKA - dealing with people who I don't report to and who don't report to me, yet getting them all on the same page I want to be on so my team can do the best at their job. I also keep up with changes in our software stack as well as our competitors and run trainings for my team and other teams to keep everyone up to date.

Would you recommend the career to others?
Absolutely - if you like dealing with people (and I REALLY MEAN THAT) - this job is awesome. I get to keep a bit geeky, and at the same time help others become the best they can be. I get paid a lot to sit in an office and talk with people I like about software that helps our customers. To get into a job like mine - go get sales experience, then become technical, then LOVE people... you'll be here in ~8-10 years.

tbird1706 said:   First time participating and first post on fat wallet!

welcome aboard!

Gender: Female

Age: 38

Location: KC

Occupation: RN

Education: Associate's degree

2012 Compensation: Wildly fluctuated. My old unit closed, costing me my PRN wages (overnights on the weekend ran $40/hour, dayshift ran $35) but got regular full time gig with benefits and a fixed schedule. Time vs money; towards the end of 2012, time won. Benefits cost me over $10/hour, but I get to work one shift instead of combinations of first, second and third.

Future Salary Projection: typical annual raises based on years of experience

Benefits: Medical, dental, vision, 403B, set schedule, discount to fitness center on site ($10/month), severely discounted coinsurance for treatments @ the hospital I work at, starting at 20ish days of PTO a year

What's the job like? Working with people at their worst; some tedious documentation (If you don't document it, you didn't do it)

Would you recommend the career to others? Really depends on patience and gag reflex.

mewhojen said:   Gender: Female

Would you recommend the career to others? Really depends on patience and gag reflex.


Wait, what career are you talking about again?

Gender: Female
Age: 27
Location: Virginia
Occupation: Registered Nurse
Education: BSN

2012 Compensation: Base 29/hr (~55k) + night/weekend/holiday differentials (~10k). Bonus of $250.

Future Salary Projection: Outlook is poor; raises for next year were announced to be 0.5%-2% based on where you fall in the salary percentile matrix and dependent on resolution of fiscal cliff. If Medicare cuts via sequestration occur, we will not receive any raise in 2013. I also think Obamacare will lead to less staff in general being employed at lower wages and higher workloads, based on reading between the lines from corporate communications.

Benefits: 401k match of 3%, pension 3% of salary, typical medical/dental/vision benefits. 173 hours PTO/sick leave which is about 14.5 shifts.

What's the job like? I'm responsible for assessing patients, notifying MD of any changes, carrying out MD orders, giving medications, prepping patients for procedures and sometimes taking them off the floor (to MRI or OR), coordinating care with others fields (respiratory, physical therapy etc). Long 12 hour shifts and on your feet for most of it. Sometimes you are so busy you don't get a break or time to eat, other times you have lots of downtime- just depends on what's going on.

Would you recommend the career to others? Absolutely not. Between the general stress of the job itself (patient going down hill in room 1, medications due in room 2, call button buzzing in room 3 etc), catty coworkers, crummy pay and working strictly nights with many weekends and holidays required it's not worth it to me as I pretty much have no life. Working dayshift is an option, but you get paid just your base rate to do A LOT more work. Looking to get out ASAP.

Infinion_2011 said: Gender: Male

Age: 26

Location: IN (Small city with rural cost of living)

Occupation: Electrical/Computer Design Engineer

Education: BS Computer Engineering, nearby private university with close ties to current employer

2011 Compensation: ~54K + 7k Bonus

Future Salary Projection: 2012 - Just shy of $60k, plus expected bonus of 4-6k. Bonuses have been annually between 5-10%. In the next few years, my job title may change, allowing me to bill clients at a higher rate and allowing my employer to pay me more. I would expect a 10-15% raise that year from what other employees have mentioned.

Benefits: 3% match dollar-for-dollar SIMPLE IRA. 50% employee health, vision premiums paid + 15% of deductible in cash to my HSA, which means my net health insurance costs are roughly $0 annually. Decent dental insurance offered, employee pays. $20,000 Life. Free drinks, food sometimes, some mostly-for-fun travel included. Extremely flexible scheduling, will discuss time off below.

What's the job like?
Pretty great in my view. Very much not like a real job in a lot of ways. My work is mostly interesting, engaging, and mentally challenging. We strive to have a bare minimum of menial tasks, worthless meetings, and encumbrances. Guidance provided as needed, but the boss isn't over my shoulder all the time. In fact, my boss is an engineer, which helps things go much better as compared to some others I know in the same field. Very low stress, we answer to our clients, so if I miss a deadline, it's my fault for not estimating it appropriately.

...

Would you recommend the career to others?
Of course. My pay might seem low, but given the local cost of living, and the tangible and intangible benefits I have, I'm not complaining much. Comparatively, I work in a much lower stress environment, with great benefits, as compared to some people I graduated with. A few relocated to the coasts, and are making some more money, but I tend to value the work-life balance more than the extra money. The work can be rewarding depending on what kinds of project you get to work on.


Age: 27

Location: IN (Small city with rural cost of living)

Occupation: Electrical/Computer Design Engineer

Education: BS Computer Engineering

2012 Compensation: $60K + $6k Bonus

Future Salary Projection: 2013 - Salary goes to $62500. Bonuses have been trending down somewhat because we have more people to split it among. Our profit margins look to be diminished some. Hopefully we'll revise our billable rates and increase revenue, but I don't have any control or knowledge of this.

Benefits: Basics the same as above. Not the greatest, but we keep employee costs low. Employees have input on all benefits offered. Because of the company structure there is incentive to maximize the value for both employees and the company as a whole. We've been able to continue to offer a high deductible HSA-eligible plan with very low costs that makes a lot of sense for most of our employees. That will likely change for 2014.

What's the job like?
Same as last year. I still enjoy it. Even though I could go somewhere else (likely relocate) and make more money, it's not worth the possible quality of life changes. Company culture hasn't changed even though we've been growing at a fairly significant rate. Some of the new people aren't as interesting as the old group. But, we've only had one person leave (to go to grad school), so everyone else must be pretty satisfied too. I've continued to work with a smaller team within the company that is highly flexible and works with smaller, more interesting, and more dynamic projects. That's something I really appreciate about my current position.

Would you recommend the career to others?
Same answer as last year.

I must say I am quite impressed with the salaries of FWF members. I did some quick math with the 38 posts so far and the Median salary is 85K and the Average salary is 111K. Even if I take out the top 3 and bottom 3 outliers the Median stays at 85K and the AVG drops marginally to 101K, still quite impressive given the Median family income in 2009 was 49K.

Also intersting with the same 38 data points the median age is 28 and the average age is 30.

Would be interesting to see how things play out as more data points come in...

MaxRC said:   bigdinkel said:   
I feel underappreciated, and don't have a strong desire to stay at my employer. The problem I've found while searching at other employers is that they want 60+ hours a week and I won't get paid that much more. I want more experience and problem-solving, but I'm not going to work 60-70 hours a week in my mid-20s to break my back for a few extra grand per year. During my days off I'm learning more about software programming and hope to get into this industry later.
If mid twenties isn't the time to put in 60-70 hour weeks, I don't know when else it would make sense to. Also, doesn't sales positions have some sort of commission/bonus structure? Is your field one of those defined ladder type situations where you are essentially slave labor until you become high enough in the food chain? In my early to mid 20's I traveled extensively and often slept at work. I wasn't paid that well for it in retrospect, but if there's an end goal to it all, such as a higher position, I'd go for it. I am not sure how far you are going to get with "programming" if you lack a relevant degree or experience. It isn't something you can pickup by studying self-help books.
\

If I'm going to get compensated more, then I'll do certainly do it. Unfortunately, many corporations in the Phoenix area are giving me low offers with little opportunity to ask for more. I'm prepared to work 60 hours a week, but I'm not going to do it if I'm only going to see a 10% pay increase. One thing that I truly value is a work/life balance. To me, it's hard to put a solid price on that.

master44 said:   I must say I am quite impressed with the salaries of FWF members. I did some quick math with the 38 posts so far and the Median salary is 85K and the Average salary is 111K. Even if I take out the top 3 and bottom 3 outliers the Median stays at 85K and the AVG drops marginally to 101K, still quite impressive given the Median family income in 2009 was 49K.

Would be interesting to see how things play out as more data points come in...


Previous years have also been impressive as I recall. I expect this is the result of the fact that one FWF probably attracts folks on average with higher incomes and two, folks with higher incomes are more likely to post in threads such as this.

sharky1985 said:    I pretty much have no life. Working dayshift is an option, but you get paid just your base rate to do A LOT more work. Looking to get out ASAP.

The answer is to marry a doctor

Gender: Female
Age: 35
Location: Washington
Occupation: FT Undergrad Student
Education: BA Business - Accounting expected June 2013

2012 Compensation: $17,968 in scholarship awards over tuition/fee costs (100% outside scholarships). Total scholarships awarded (including tuition/fees) divided by total hours invested in applications = $414/hr

Future Salary Projection: 35-45K starting salary range with a BA and CPA eligible, if I land a job.

Benefits: Easy academic schedule, plenty of school breaks and holidays. Inexpensive student health coverage (free doctor's visits and simple medical tests).

What's the job like? I spend lots of time studying and getting involved with on-campus clubs, plus off-campus volunteerism. Still, it probably only equals a full time job most of the time. There's enough time left over to study for the CPA exam, which I'll start taking in February.

Would you recommend this path to others? Absolutely! When someone tells you it's a waste of time to apply for outside scholarships, they're full of BS. Unless you have a merit scholarship at a private university and it'll reduce your merit award, you should apply to every scholarship you can find that you qualify for. Sure, you need to have great grades to get past the initial cut. More importantly, you need to know how to get your personality across in your writing. I'm still tossing around the idea of continuing my education for a Masters of Accountancy in Taxation and applying for more scholarships to pay for most of it. I'd rather just start a job, but no luck quite yet. I'm just grateful to have this opportunity for a career after working a low-wage job since I was a teenager - nothing can be much worse than that, especially when I'm getting paid as much as I earned in my old job to go to school! Here's to hoping I have a real job for next year's thread!

Gender: Male

Age: 29 (in January '13)

Location: SE Michigan

Occupation: Electrical Engineer in a consulting firm

Education: BSEE (local state school), MSEE (Top 10 engineering school), MBA (Top 10 B-School, 1/3 done in a part-time program), Registered PE

2012 Compensation: $72K

Future Salary Projection: Lucky if I get 3% a year.

Benefits: Vanilla Medical, Vision & Dental, 3% match on 401k

What's the job like?

As a consultant, the answer to this question depends heavily on the types of projects we have on hand and the client. My current project is great and I get to work on a $750M project in a lead capacity. Recognition is hard, if not impossible to come by, same with raises. Bonus program was axed not long after I joined. I've done everything to try to stand out from the pack (industry certs, youngest engineer in the company to get a PE, leadership in office groups). I get great feedback from the PMs but the boss won't even acknowledge the email they send to him (confirmed from a couple of people recently). Basically, I'm done with engineering. There is no appreciation or career progression for people who are not part of the good old boys club (I'm a visible minority and 95% of my office is not; in Engineering this is unheard of).


Would you recommend the career to others?

Yes. Just not within my company. Engineering can be very rewarding and the pay is better than the social sciences. However, after 6 years of working and not an inch of career progression, it can be quite frustrating. The MBA is my ticket out.

Meh, I'll play

Gender: Male
Age: 35
Location: Baltimore
Occupation: Health Care Analyst (Federal govt)
Education: Masters from top rank school in policy area

2012 Compensation: $91,000
Future Salary Projection: Have a few years of "step" increase left (~3%), and COLAs (assuming they ever come back). Would hope to move up a GS level at some point, but that is difficult given that I have no interest in supervising anybody other than myself. After I run out of steps, I would strongly consider moving to consulting... hopefully some of my friends will have their own agencies by then.

Benefits: Job security, job security, job security. 4 weeks vacation, 10+ holidays, plus sick time. Ability to telecommute (though I don't) Okay medical, 401K equivalent with 5% match. I have a very flexible schedule (though this is not true of everybody).

What's the job like? A lot of writing and re-writing of memos, regulations, position papers, issue papers, reports, proposals, correspondence, etc. Many periods of downtime followed by intense periods of scrambling to meet deadlines. Many, many, many, many meetings and conference calls.

Would you recommend this path to others? Yes, but only because I value job security so deeply. I started this job in mid-2007 after a career change, and the timing worked out. I also enjoy some aspects of the process that might be infuriating to others. While true of most professions, the "it's what you make of it" school of thought is probably more true in government. There are people here who are so stressed, work long hours and weekends, are constantly at war with some department or agency to push something along, that they are under constant risk of burnout. There are also people here who take on so little responsiblility they get suicidal from the boredom. But if you are a capable person, and able to set limits, it's a pretty accomodating environment... all things considered. You have keep perspective that even seeminly minor, insignificant policy changes can result in shifts of millions or billions of dollars, so there is a reason the systems seems designed to accomplish next to nothing. If you crave immense power and money, or desire to see real immediate fruits of your labor, look elsewhere.

Looks like I've got the lowest salary of all FWF... sadface

I console myself with the thought that I'd have earned in the $40s if not for a bout of unemployment and loss of ~2 weeks pay due to no paid holidays or sick time

Gender: Male
Age: 32
Location: Midwest

Occupation: Accountant (at a small, local public accounting firm)

Education: B.A. with extra credits and a CPA

2012 Compensation: a bit over $55k (base).

Future Salary Projection: Due to where I'm at, I'm guessing just 3-5% raises for the future, unless I become a partner, which I don't want to do.

Benefits: 10 days vacation and 5 sick. So-so medical. 3% 401k match. Payment of continuing ed expenses.

What's the job like?: As it is a small, local firm (about 10 employees), I wear a lot of hats. At the moment, I'm starting the work for a few year end audits and reviews, am helping with W-2 and payroll form processing and have been doing tax planning for most of December. I would say that in a typical year, my time is split between assurance work and financial statement preparation (35%), tax planning and preparation (35%), misc and special projects (30%).

Unfortunately, I'm at the point where I've done work on pretty much every client and there isn't much more for me to learn. As there is no chance for title advancement and I don't want to go the partner route (due to both the personalities and the lifestyle that would require), I'm starting to eye other jobs.

Would I recommend the career to others?: Yes, but if I had to do it over again, I would say start a regional firm or one of the Big 4, as both open a lot of doors latter down the road. It does seem like small firms can be good fits depending on management and if you want a better work/life balance (compared to the larger firms).

Gender: Male
Age: 38
Location: South East
Occupation: Technical Sales and Army National Guard
Education: BA Anthropology

2012 Compensation: Total combined: $258,600, Civilan Job: $225,000 ($112k base, $113k commission), National Guard: $15,600, VA Comp: $18,000.

Future Salary Projection: Base increase of 3-10%, commission 3-10% on every dollar in sales I'm paid on, however, it will fluctuate up or down based on sales next year.

Benefits: Work from home (when not traveling), company car/phone/internet, 401k match .50 on the dollar for up to 6% of sallary, company provies an additional 3% of sallary to 401k regardless of participation. 4 weeks vacation, 3 PTO days, every holiday you can think of basically (forget the number off the top of my head), 5 sick days...not that I can use them as there are always calls to be made even when you're sick, full family med/dental/vision

What's the job like? Fantastic! I get to talk to people from engineers to C level executives every day without having to make cold calls to get in to see them (that's what my territory sales guys are for). While talking with them, I get to assist them in finding solutions to the problems they are having, and it just so happens I sell those solutions (amazing how that works out eh?). Of course there is implementation of our solutions that I help with, and then the odd technical issue that I'll help resolve so the customer doesn't have to wait on support. Best part I think is working from a home office. Even though I travel quite a bit, maybe up to 50% or so in total, I get to see my family more than if I had a 9-5 job in the city and had to commute every day. Travel can be sporadic, gone 4-5 days one week, then home all the next week. The worst is when I'm gone for a whole week, have to go to National Guard for the weekend and then gone the whole next week. That can be ruff, but not too terrible, I mean it beats being gone for a year in a hostile environment.

Would you recommend the career to others? Yes. You need to be able to be comfortable talking to anybody and be able to speak their language, as an engineer talks and responds to how you talk much differently than a C level exec. You also have to be quick on your feet and be a great problem solver, but if you have those, you are golden.

Gender: Male

Age: 28

Location: East SF Bay Area

Occupation: (Programmer/Developer/Coder/whatever other preferred label).

Education: Bachelor's Engineering Degree

2012 Compensation: $88,000 (Combined income from two jobs. Switched Jobs mid year.)

Future Salary Projection: $82000 (Expected lower pay with switching from private to public).

Benefits: Defined Benefit Plan, luckily got in before the "reform" hits. Full health (MDV), gym, OT, typical public job. ~2k/year in "cash-able" additional benefits.

What's the job like?
Solve problems. Get more work. Solve more problems. Little oversight and have plenty of creative leeway. It can get pretty dull at times when there's not much challenging.

Would you recommend the career to others?
Only if you truly enjoy it. Otherwise, you'll just be another rat in the race.

Gender: Male

Age: 28

Location: Midwest

Occupation: Registered Nurse in a hospital setting

Education: two year associates degree. No student loan debt.

2012 Compensation: $40k. I make $21/hr.

Future Salary Projection: $100k/yr with a master's in nurse practioner or $200k/yr as a CRNA.

Benefits: Work 3 nights a week but it takes 2 nights to recover, hope to get onto day shift. Good career prospects if you can work towards a master's degree program.

What's the job like? Very rewarding when the patients are happy. Stressful when they are confused, agitated, pulling out their IV's and other tubes.

Would you recommend the career to others? Yes if you can be patient and kind to other people, especially new nurses.

master44 said:   I must say I am quite impressed with the salaries of FWF members. I did some quick math with the 38 posts so far and the Median salary is 85K and the Average salary is 111K. Even if I take out the top 3 and bottom 3 outliers the Median stays at 85K and the AVG drops marginally to 101K, still quite impressive given the Median family income in 2009 was 49K.

Also intersting with the same 38 data points the median age is 28 and the average age is 30.

Would be interesting to see how things play out as more data points come in...


This is OT, but if you take top and bottom N out, median would always stay the same.

Age: 35
Location: NYC
Education: BA in Math, PhD
Occupation: Finance, Trading
Current Job: Design / implement statistical models that trade securities
2012 Income: $460K
Future projections: I would like to make 7 figures / Year in the next few years
Benefits: Very good
Whats the job like: Analyze market data to find future winners and losers in stocks and other securities. Understand how securities markets work.
Would you recommend the job to others: I would recommend to others who have the educational background (math, computer science, possibly finance), and the drive.
One downside to the job is there is no 401K match due to ERISA highly compensated restrictions.

Last years post: http://www.fatwallet.com/forums/arcmessageview.php?start=120&cat... Scroll to the middle, post is dated Jan/07/2012 11:06 PM.

Me and my big mouth. Same job as last year, working much harder on more critical projects, yet being paid less.

Gender: Male

Age: 37

Location: Washington DC

Occupation: consulting manager

Education: BS, PMP, ITIL

2011 Compensation: $125k base + $50k bonus, paid quarterly (target bonus was 31.5k, but combination of being high performer and company always fiddling with comp structure yielded loopholes working in my favor).

2012 Compensation: Received a 2% raise, and the bonus formula tweaking swung way too far the other direction. $127.5k base + 25k bonus. Worked a lot of 80-100 hours a week this year, which sucks. On the positive side I can't imagine how others in my org felt with their pay this year.

Future Salary Projection: I have no idea. I expect a modest (2-5%) raise, and my bonus will be tweaked yet again. The mistake the company made for 2012 was tying bonus to sales (license and consulting services) performance, meaning it didn't matter how well or poorly you performed, you were punished severely if sales missed expectations, which it did for much of 2012.

Benefits: Same as they were last year, except healthcare costs were flat. Standard large-ish software company benefits. Work from home full time, medical/dental split with employer, 5% 401k match, stock purchase program at 15% discount, home internet/phone paid for, company iPhone, 15 days of PTO, "wellness" program that pays up to $250 annually for gym membership. Nothing sexy here.

What's the job like?

This year it was very hard. Not challenging, just hard. My reward for performing well was being assigned customers in one of two situations: 1) the customer was so pissed off they were ready to switch to another vendor and miracles needed to be performed, or 2) there was a very large license/sales opportunity where project execution had to be very crisp in order to win the sale. The net result were many many days where I started at 4-5 AM and finished between 10-midnight.

In an ideal world, as it was in 2011, and in 2010 when I'm doing my job really well I have plenty of time to pursue my own interests, whether it's surfing fatwallet, studying and working on improving my skills, or spending time with my family. My peers don't understand this but when you're doing this role well, customers don't call because they are satisfied and don't need me. When I'm doing my job well, consultants don't call me because I make them understand they are accountable for success or for failure and I remove obstacles to their success. My management doesn't call me because consultants aren't quitting or complaining, customers aren't calling to complain - (they're calling to buy more services or software) and invoices are being paid. Customer support doesn't call me because the customer and my consulting teams work well together and don't open a lot of support tickets for the product.

So if you are good at listening, if you are good at motivating others and holding them accountable, you can probably do my job. For whatever reason, the above points seem to be lost on my peers at my company. They spend a lot of time forgetting how to do the basics and as a result seem to create endless issues for themselves which they're constantly remediating.

Would you recommend the career to others?

Last year I said no, and this year I would say, "yes, if". The consulting organization of a software company, especially medium to large ones, are punching bags for the problems of their engineering/R&D, sales and support organizations. Most of my day is spent addressing project issues resulting from one of those above orgs all the while trying to keep the consultants I manage on my projects motivated and happy and the dysfunction transparent from my customers.

You will spend a lot of time dealing with poorly written contracts, sales people who overpromised to close a deal, poorly scoped contracts, and product defects which affect your ability to complete work on the schedule expected by your customers. And everyone (your employer, your customer) will blame you.

And at the end of it, the reward for doing my job really well is the reality my compensation does not reflect my capabilities, hard work, or successes.

So if you live in a major tech hub (Seattle, SF area, NYC, Boston or Austin) I absolutely recommend my career. You're much more likely to be earn a solid wage and have opportunities to work at interesting companies and perhaps even strike it rich in the process. These employers are most likely to be the ones with better benefits, smarter people and "tech" culture.

If that isn't you, then think long and hard about whether you want my job. I noticed this year how many of my peers are divorced, on second or third marriages, or just have personal issues which result from the stress of being pummeled by your customers and your company during the day, and your family when you leave work.

Gender: Male

Age: 34

Location: Iowa - hooray low cost of living

Occupation: Business Analyst for formerly top 10 Intl Financial Services Company/Bank, probably still top 25

Education: BS in Business Mgmt

2012 Compensation: $70k. It's openly discussed this is below market point for a BA, but see location, takes the sting out

Future Salary Projection: Probably just 3% or so annually. I'm likely nearly maxed out in my current position. The 'path' calls for me to be a 'Senior' BA by now but I don't want to deal with the glorified babysitting and corporate BS more than I already do.

Benefits: average priced medical (I use the HDHP at $6/mo), 401k matching 100% up to 6%, cash balance plan that pretty much amounts to 4% of salary that recently replaced trad'l pension, 23 days paid time off, market holidays off, matching volunteer time and $

What's the job like?
I am in a typical corporate cube farm, team of 14 with relatively hands-off mgmt. My team lead and I may meet every 2-4 weeks and fire emails about assignments back and forth, his and my manager is across the country, and the org structure above him has changed at least a half dozen times in 6 years, never impacting my daily work life; I learned long ago to not bother learning or caring about any of the announcements, meet & greets, etc.

Pretty much every work minute is in front of a computer, meetings anymore I often do over the phone and rarely use conference rooms myself. We used to be pushed on "face to face" and "availability" but it's become clear that stuff doesn't really matter. My customers are largely on the same floor, but also some in other US locations...the company recently outsourced nearly all of the former to a third party services firm that I'm pretty sure is in the process of outsourcing most of it to India. So far no word or reason to expect my team, falling under 'IT', will have the same fate, but the company's future is up in the air a bit. I write business/functional requirements, perform QA testing, and provide production support for agent licensing/commission systems of various configurations and origination; act as a liasion between the various IT support teams for these systems and the users. Been at it almost 6 years now and am considered an expert and a go-to by my peers, the SOLE go-to when it comes to a couple of the systems. The amount of unique systems knowledge I've seen be allowed to fly out of here, and its current state in many cases, is appalling.

The job reqs state 45-55 hrs a week, I can not recall the last time I worked over 40...or maybe even that. Most days I say very little to anyone, listen to my iPod, surf some internet, may or may not have a person or two stop by my desk, etc. In the past I've had some "on-call" type responsibilities and the very occasional weekend checkout, but I've finagled things such that I don't have anything like that anymore. I get to work from home one day a week, which I like very much. Even though I'm only 7 miles from the office, and my town is nothing like say, Chicago, I hate commuting (ok, other drivers mostly) so much. I come in between 8 and 9:30, leave 3:45-5:45, take a lunch or don't, nobody cares, as long as the work gets done, which I think i do faster than the average bear. I see others working 55 hrs a week but in many cases I think they're masters of doing a 40 hr job in 55. I do mine in 20-30 hrs and it's obviously enough, my reviews always go well and my work considered high-quality. I have no incentive to go above and beyond as I don't want the career advancement. I very much lucked into this position after a few years as a convenience store asst mgr, I'm grateful for it, I am content to ride it out as long as it goes.

Would you recommend the career to others?
It's corporate america.

master44 said:   I must say I am quite impressed with the salaries of FWF members. I did some quick math with the 38 posts so far and the Median salary is 85K and the Average salary is 111K. Even if I take out the top 3 and bottom 3 outliers the Median stays at 85K and the AVG drops marginally to 101K, still quite impressive given the Median family income in 2009 was 49K.

Also intersting with the same 38 data points the median age is 28 and the average age is 30.

Would be interesting to see how things play out as more data points come in...


I think it's always going to be skewed towards the higher end, how many people are going to post:



Gender: Male

Age: 40

Location: Northern NJ

Occupation: Urban Burger Flipper

Education: GED

2012 Compensation: $14,000 (Base Pay, no overtime)

Future Salary Projection: Not too much further to go from here in my current position.

Benefits: No

What's the job like?

Hot.

Would you recommend the career to others?

Sure, but if you don't like the kitchen, stay out.

tolamapS said:   Age: 35
Location: NYC
Education: BA in Math, PhD
Occupation: Finance, Trading
Current Job: Design / implement statistical models that trade securities
2012 Income: $460K
Future projections: I would like to make 7 figures / Year in the next few years
Benefits: Very good
Whats the job like: Analyze market data to find future winners and losers in stocks and other securities. Understand how securities markets work.
Would you recommend the job to others: I would recommend to others who have the educational background (math, computer science, possibly finance), and the drive.
One downside to the job is there is no 401K match due to ERISA highly compensated restrictions.

Last years post: http://www.fatwallet.com/forums/arcmessageview.php?start=120&cat... Scroll to the middle, post is dated Jan/07/2012 11:06 PM.


Just curious, what is the actual job title for your position?

Gender: Male

Age: 29

Location: NJ

Occupation: IT (work for a medical practice, ~100 employees)

Education: AS

2012 Compensation: $62,000 salary + $8k stipend for health insurance

Future Salary Projection: Same dead end...

Benefits: Dental, 401k (100% match first 3%, and 50% match next 2%), 50k life insurance policy, wife & kids see our doctors with no copay/expenses. I work from home 2 days/week, and get 4 weeks vacation + 5 personal days/year.

What's the job like? Well we finally hired a second IT person this year, and I was promoted to manager of the department. This was a title & increased responsibilities, but almost no increase in compensation. It was nice in that it reduced my after-hours calls significantly. I've spent my new-found free time to do some consulting on the side netting about 10-15k this year. I rarely get to work from home 2 days a week anymore, but regularly get 1. I now have 3 kids (all boys) so the home time is a plus.

Would you recommend the career to others? See below. If you can think on your feet and learn quickly, you can go far. It doesn't happen overnight though. This is probably true in any industry.

Last year's post:
Gender: Male

Age: 28

Location: NJ

Occupation: IT (work for a medical practice, ~100 employees)

Education: AS

2011 Compensation: $61,000 salary + $5k stipend for health insurance

Future Salary Projection: Going nowhere fast, seems to be about 3%/yr increases.

Benefits: Dental, 401k (100% match first 3%, and 50% match next 2%), 50k life insurance policy, wife & kids see our doctors with no copay/expenses. I work from home 2 days/week, and get 4 weeks vacation + 5 personal days/year.

What's the job like? I am the only IT person supporting the entire network (9 locations, 12 servers, 100+ workstations & laptops) and am expected to be on call 24/7/365. This is entirely incompatible with my expectations/family life (2 kids + 1 on the way) so I take a lot of flak for not answering phone calls off hours or when I'm on vacation. Other than that I enjoy the work.

Would you recommend the career to others? I wouldn't recommend NOT going down this path. I think in any position, you have to be able to stand up for yourself, because nobody will stand up for you. I was promised many things when I started with this company and they have a tendency to 'forget'. I do not expect to be working there in 5 years. I'm not nearly as bitter as this post ended up sounding. I actually like it there, it's just a dead end salary-wise.

Gender: Male

Age: 24

Location: Indianapolis

Occupation: Operations Officer for a nonprofit. In addition to handling operations, I also have a lot of finance-related responsibilities.

Education: BS Finance, MBA (completed Nov. '12). Both from a small, private university in Indiana.

2012 Compensation: $36,500

Future Salary Projection: Now that I've completed my MBA, I'm expecting a decent raise in January. Guessing in the 10-20% range.

Benefits: Insurance (HDHP, vision, dental) fully paid by company. All of the typical holidays. 1 PTO day per month. 2 weeks of vacation per year. 403b match of 9% by company if I contribute 3%. Company puts $100 per paycheck into my HSA to compensate for having HDHP.

What's the job like? Outside of occasional projects, I essentially do the same thing every day. I've become very efficient at it so a typical day will have around 2 hours of downtime. Our nonprofit provides loans to churches and obtains the funding from depositors affiliated with the church denomination. The majority of my responsibilities are handling all customer communications, processing all transactions, preparing regulatory reports, and doing the majority of the accounting work.

Would you recommend the career to others? It's been a great first job out of college. As a small organization, career advancement opportunities are essentially nonexistent. Now that I've completed my MBA, I'll most likely be looking in 2013 for a different job within the nonprofit sector that would include more responsibilities and challenges.

Gender: Male
Age: 26
Location: Dallas
Occupation: Accountant
Education: BS in Finance

2012 Compensation: ~47k a year, $22.57/hr

Future Salary Projection: Hoping to be mid 50's or higher by next year. Going to finish my CPA exam in 2013 and will get my license around then too.

Benefits: Fully paid healthcare, 4% match on 5% contributed, 10 days PTO and no sick time (this part sucks)

What's the job like? I like it. I'm pretty busy for 2 weeks out of the month and then just follow up on things the remaining 2 weeks. I have a decent amount of decision making I do and my boss doesn't just hover around over me. I rarely have to work more than 45 hours a week.

Would you recommend the career to others? I like it. I can't say whether or not going into industry first over public is the way to go just yet.

BigManOnCampus 2011 Post said: Gender: Male

Age: 24

Location: Cincinnati

Occupation: Currently - Financial Analyst, but last day there is 1/12 and then the new job title will be Pricing Analyst

Education: Bachelor's in Finance, I forsee starting an MBA in 2012.

2011 Compensation: $41,200

Future Salary Projection: I'm taking almost a $20,000 pay increase at the new job, I couldn't be happier. Between that and a side project I'm working on, I'm hoping to total around $65,000 in 2012. While that might not necessarily be "having the world by the balls" to other people, I have 0 debt and live in a low cost of living area so I'm a happy guy.

Benefits: Currently, exceptional medical, dental, vision, life insurance, 401k with a puny match, pension (that I'll never get because I'm leaving), 2 weeks vacation and 14 holidays. I'm leaving that great benefits package for not as good insurance, less vacation, better 401k match and fewer holidays. I really don't like sitting at home doing nothing, so I'm hoping I won't miss the vacation.

What's the job like?
I'm the guy who does all the reporting for every executive, every facility, etc. The company I work for is extremely large and so reporting processes are very uniform. Basically I spend the first two weeks of any given month doing the month end reporting and then the second half of the month are done improving processes, creating new financial models, etc. I like the second half of the month and hate the first half.

Would you recommend this career to others?
I have told myself for the two years I've been at that job that it was paying dues for better future jobs. I wouldn't recommend my job as a career, but as I've seen with hard work, some luck and willingness to learn and ask questions it's an amazing stepping stone to better things. The great thing about being where I am in corporate finance is that I am on a first name basis with every executive from CEO down and that's not something many people can say they had at 24. If you find business genuinely interesting, you will do well in corporate finance. That being said, if you are just doing it because it's more likely that you will have a paycheck than if you majored in art history (like a co-worker of mine) you'll be miserable. .


Age: 25
Location: Cincinnati (however a much nicer part than last year)
Occupation: Pricing Analyst for an auto lender
Education: Bachelor's in Finance, MBA Currently in Process
2012 Compensation: $58k Base, $2k Profit Sharing, $1k in referral bonuses

Benefits: 401k with a light match, decent medical and dental (though I pay through the nose for it), 6 holidays, 2 weeks paid time off.

Future Salary Projection: No idea what raises will be like, my boss has told me we would discuss compensation in the next month. With the changes that we have made and the impact my work has made, I could see a generous raise, or I could not see an extra dime. Time will tell. That being said, I don't see a long career path at my current company and I'm seeing a likely career change after I finish my MBA. At that point, I'm hoping to increase my salary up to six figures having 5 years of professional experience and a masters.

Job Responsibilities: I am responsible for creating and monitoring risk and pricing metrics to ensure that we maximize both lending volume while minimizing risk. I have made tons of financial models to measure and monitor everything that I have to. It's a lot of analytical work, looking for patterns and slicing and analyzing data for the executive team.

Would you recommend this career to others?: A hard question, on the one hand, my job is intellectually and not physically difficult. I spend lots of time as one of the go-to guys to get information on deciding how the company should run. I am my own department and have and am learning skills that could get me a lot of places in the lending industry. That being said, you have to be comfortable with a lot of the same stuff day in and day out and basically spending all your time around home base. My problem at this point in my life is that I want to be out in the field doing, instead of being the guy back in the office planning and analyzing. It seems strange that right now I'm at half the age of the executives I work for but essentially have the power to make their decisions for them. If I was content to settle down, get married and have a family now, I would be in a great position, the problem is that I'm just not there yet.

ironfist99, 2011 said: Gender: Male

Age: 28

Location: SF Bay Area

Occupation: Software Engineer

Education: BS in Computer Science/Engineering

2011 Compensation: $187K

Future Salary Projection: 2012 Comp between 215K-240K depending on bonus

Benefits: 4 Weeks a year vacation, no-deductable/copay medical/dental. 401K matching and ESPP.

What's the job like?
Like any office job, I spend lots of time at my desk or in meetings. I design and write software all day.

Would you recommend the career to others?
Absolutely. The pay and benefits are good, you are free to work your own schedule (I personally work 11-8), and the job market is hot (I get called by recruiters weekly). I must warn that the job is not for everyone, as some people find sitting at a desk writing code intolerable, and getting an entry level position can be hard if you did not have the correct major.

Age: 29

Location: SF Bay Area

Occupation: Development Manager (Moved from an IC this year)

Education: BS in Computer Science/Engineering
2012 Compensation: $248K (a little higher than the top end of my projections)

Future Salary Projection: 2013 Comp between 230K-265K depending on bonus

What's the job like?: Same as last year, but now with managing 10-15 other engineers in addition to the work I previously did.

...

disband said:   
Why not launch a web startup now as a student? I'm sure you can do that in your free-time initially, no?


Working on it ... Surprisingly little free time as a student I had more when I was working.

Gender: Male
Age: 32
Location: Midwest USA
Occupation: IT Consultant
Education: MS, several industry recognized certifications: MCITP EA/EMA, CISSP, CEH and others.

2012 Compensation: $103,480 base, plus $5,000 extra tuition reimbursement (taxable, since after $5250 limit).

Future Salary Projection: between $106,580-109,680 based on performance and potential promotion. Significantly more if I find another position (lackadaisically looking at the moment, only will move for a very good fit).

Benefits: Employer pays 75% of insurance premiums and contributes 10% to 401k regardless of my contribution. $5k for education. Generous amounts for other training that is not exactly capped, but should be reasonable and based on current projects. Identity theft protection for entire family, group legal, flexible schedule, five weeks of PTO, and a PTO buyback program this year of up to 80 hours.

What's the job like: Becoming rather unrewarding. The consulting gig seemed very good, but I have been dedicated to one client the entire time I have worked here, thus far, so it isn't as appealing as I would like. It is extremely hectic as the client doesn't respond well to recommendations, and then they get very upset when repercussions of ignoring the recommendations occur. My boss says that a tough client makes a good consultant, but the reward I have seen thus far is that you just get the next tough client in line since you are the guy that can handle them.

Would you recommend the career to others? Yes, as soon as your reach mid-level in IT, it makes sense to become a consultant as it helps you grow rather quickly, work in many environments (most of the time), and will help you move into senior and other roles of responsibility.

Gender: Male

Age: 28

Location: Texas

Occupation: Self-Employed, Gym Owner (multiple locations)

Education: BS

2012 Compensation: $520,000

Future Salary Projection: $575-600K

Benefits: Same benefit plan my employees get - Medical, Dental, 401K.

What's the job like?
I worked for a year in corporate finance before I came to the realization that the corporate life was not and would never be for me. I scrounged together some cash and took a chance opening a gym. It took off. I've opened up ~1/year since then and plan to continue growing at that rate. Having the freedom to work for myself is priceless in itself. Being able to enjoy financial success at the same time is a huge bonus. I manage a team of 35 personal trainers, managers, sales and support staff. In order to grow at this rate I'll have to soon hire some sort of regional manager(s) to assist with the day to day. I've always enjoyed working out and being in charge, so this path is perfect for me.

Would you recommend the career to others?
If you're young, yes. If you don't have much of a career to sacrifice, yes. It's definitely risky and not for everyone. There's a low barrier to entry and the business is relatively easy to learn compared to others. But at the same time, there's a lot to be said for having the stability of a 9-5 and leaving work at work on the evening and weekends. Unlike other jobs where you typically specialize in one skill, I've had to learn how to become a marketing/accounting/sales/hr/management/strategy expert (none of which I had much experience with), so the learning curve was high in that respect. I NEVER stop thinking about work and how we can improve and grow. The biggest source of stress is managing staff. There's high turnover and gym employees are typically a different breed of people to deal with. But at the end of the day, I have no one to answer to but myself. It's sometimes exhausting but I wouldn't change it for anything. Any questions, PM me!

Gender: Male

Age: 24

Location: Surrounding NYC area

Occupation: Database Administrator

Education: One or two semesters away from my AS

2012 Compensation: $73,200 + 10-13% bonus expected for 2012 year in early 2013

Future Salary Projection: Most likely 2-5% every year until next promotion

Benefits: Medical, dental, vision, prescription plan, 401k matched dollar-for-dollar of 6% of total salary, one-year salary life insurance, 4 weeks vacation, unlimited sick days, very flexible boss/coworkers, tuition reimbursement

What's the job like?
It has its moments. Other than that, I'm a White dude working in the DBA world. If I were to switch companies, I'm sure I'd get put in with a lot of H1B's but who knows...just saying that from my research of local firms. Some weeks are 60+ hour weeks. Others are 35 hours.

Would you recommend the career to others?
Yes and no. Depends on what you're a DBA for. I am a DBA for a trading firm and love the fast-paced action of it. However, if you're just a DBA who does maintenance and that's about it, I'd certainly not recommend it--I dread those days.

Other notes: While I don't have a degree yet, I am happy with where I'm at. I could be making more money, but I'd most certainly have student loan debt. Currently, my entire education is being paid for while making a pretty nice chunk of change (given the job) for my age. It's as if I'm already tens of thousands of dollars ahead of the game, since I don't have student loan debt. However, I do notice that one of three (professional, personal, school) aspects of my life do suffer when a school semester is in full swing. I guess I can't win 'em all?

JTausTX said:   Looks like I've got the lowest salary of all FWF... sadface

I console myself with the thought that I'd have earned in the $40s if not for a bout of unemployment and loss of ~2 weeks pay due to no paid holidays or sick time


Just the lowest of the ones that posted on this particular topic, which will always be skewed toward the top end of the salary range.

Gender: Male

Age: 25

Location: MA

Occupation: Software Engineer at a biotech firm.

Education: Bachelors in CS/Biology.

2012 Compensation: $85,000 mostly due to a big raise about 3 months in ($95k a year was the raise).

Future Salary Projection: Barely over 6 figures with additional raise + bonus.

Benefits: Medical, dental, vision, 401k (no match), 2 weeks' vacation, 25 PTO.

What's the job like?

I work very long hours by choice. That is part of why the salary is high. It is interesting though. I am doing both corporate business software type work and some R&D stuff. The R&D is more interesting, but I would have a hard time getting the salary I am making just doing the R&D so overall pretty happy.

Would you recommend the career to others?

Yea. I would particularly advise combining Bio and CS degrees. There is a huge need for people who are mostly software engineers, but know enough about the Bio to help researchers etc. without needing everything explained.

Gender: M
Age: 35
Location: SF Bay Area
Occupation: Software Engineer
Education: BS in Comp Sci at a state univ, MS in Comp Sci at top-3 school.
2012 Compensation: $325K total (~30% of last year's take), roughly as $180K salary, $47K bonuses, $20K mandatory vacation cash out, and the rest is stock options or grants.
Future Salary Projection: No change in salary, but stock income should go up ~$100K in 2013 and another ~$50K in 2014. That's assuming I work the whole year. The current vesting schedule causes the first 2 months of each year bring in about the same as the remaining 10. So I'll retire in a February, just not sure yet if that's of 2013, 2014, or 2015.
Benefits: The customary benefits. My 5 weeks of vacation got switched to an "informal" vacation policy. It's a trend in the software industry keep the liability of unused vacation off the financial books.
What's the job like?
(refer to my 2010 post)
Would you recommend the career to others?
(refer to my 2010 post)

Gender: Male

Age: 29

Location: Chicago

Occupation: Investment Banking Associate

Education: BS Finance, MBA

2012 Compensation: $125K base salary + $0-$100k bonus paid in Q1 2013 for 2012 performance

Future Salary Projection: Don't know, will likely leave my current job in the next 6 months. Likely will take a pay cut.

Benefits: Full medical, 401k, employee stock purchase plan, some vacation I guess

What's the job like?
It's terrible. I spend my days in excel and powerpoint, putting together pitch books and formatting stuff to look pretty. I work highly unpredicatble hours, anywhere from 40-100 hours a week, including weekends, which makes it very difficult to plan things. Honestly, if I only worked 9-5, not sure I would like the job. Pluses are you get to work with a lot of large companies and high level executives. Pays well, and get free dinner and cab ride home most week nights. There is also very little job security. I could very well be laid off before I receive my bonus in early 2013.

Would you recommend the career to others?
No. Some people like it, but its certainly not for me and will be searching for a new job soon. The job doesn't pay nearly as well it did in the mid 2000's. It looks solid on a resume, and has helped me some strong technical skills. I dont regret doing it, but am ready to move on.

I posted last year as well, but largely the same message. A bit more negative now I suppose.

Gender: Male

Age: 20s

Location: DMV

Occupation: Systems Engineer

Education: B.S. Mechanical Engineering and Master's Systems Engineering (May 2015)

2012 Salary: mid 60K

Future Salary/Job Projection: Typical 3% annual raise. The industry as a whole is on the verge of getting cut substantially, I would hope to at least stay in this job for a little while through these tough times.

Benefits: Very generous: 100% employer-sponsored medical/dental/vision insurance; IRA program in which employer contributes 15-20% of annual salary without employee's contribution required. Other perks include parking reimbursement, life insurance, federal holidays, PTO, etc., smart phone and laptop. Bonus is typical 5%/year.

What's the job like? Up to 35-40% travel, both domestic and international. While on travel, you get to save up some more on allowance and rack up travel miles and hotel nights for your own. I am responsible to help the program office keep track of the project's technical performance in many aspects such as engineering studies, change proposals and upgrades, etc. and to ensure alignment of budget and schedule. Also, I go to meetings all the time and deal with a lot of people from various government and industry organizations who I do not report to and do not report to me. I ensure that everyone's on the same page and complete their duties to keep the project moving forward to meet deadline and budget constraints. My job is part engineering/part project management/part administrative support and everything else in between. It feels like you're in over your head sometimes, but the experience can be very rewarding once the project completes successfully.

Would you recommend the career to others? It is a very challenging and fast-paced position in a highly specialized field. Benefits include working with the higher ups from various government and industry organizations, which significantly extends my array of networking. I also get to learn A LOT, not only in technical but also in program management and develop people skills. In the long run, I think management is a field that really pays off financially. I would highly recommend it to anyone who's interested in engineering, project management, facing challenges and learning tons of new things everyday.

Gender: Male

Age: 43

Location: Southern California

Occupation: SAP Manager

Education: B.S. Computer Information System from a state school. MBA from one of the Top 10 Business School

2012 Salary: $100,000 plus bonuses and overtime

Future Salary Projection: 3-5% increase

Benefits: Full medical, dental and vision insurance. Company car every year (if I want a premium line, I need to pay for the difference).

What's the job like? Changing the whole finance system from a legacy system into SAP. 10% travel to different locations. In this position, I also designed the whole system from the get go. It is a very exciting and challenging position.

Would you recommend the career to others? Oh yes. If you like challenge and love to learn new things. I come to this position from a totally different field, and the reason I had this job is all about my user experience of SAP. SAP is a beast but is a very friendly and easy to use beast once you get to know it. =)



Disclaimer: By providing links to other sites, FatWallet.com does not guarantee, approve or endorse the information or products available at these sites, nor does a link indicate any association with or endorsement by the linked site to FatWallet.com.

Thanks for visiting FatWallet.com. Join for free to remove this ad.

TRUSTe online privacy certification

While FatWallet makes every effort to post correct information, offers are subject to change without notice.
Some exclusions may apply based upon merchant policies.
© 1999-2014