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This is from my wife. She isn't a techie, so she filled out it out on my account. I didn't see this job in the post and thought it might be interesting to some.

Gender: Female

Age: Early 30s

Location: Las Vegas, NV

Occupation: Veterinarian

Education: DVM (I received early acceptance into a DVM school and didn't actually completely my BS in Biology, but I had completed 90% of it)

2012 Compensation: 85k

Future Salary Projection: Flat. I am compensated at straight salary, but that is rare. Most vets are compensated either straight commission or lower base salary (40-50k'ish) + commission. I am expected to produce/bill 5x my total salary (total salary includes all benefits, licenses, employer FICA, etc. Pretty much my total cost to the clinic). If I bill more, I could potentially make more, but I don't see that being possible in the near future and even beyond that I can't see it going up drastically.

Benefits: Employer pays for CE required to keep DVM license, state license for NV, DEA license, etc. Health insurance is available, but you pay full cost (expensive). I get insurance through my hubby. No retirement accounts or matching available. No FSA available. Vacation is two weeks a year (fixed, this never increases at my position), no sick time (you only call in sick if you're dying, I've called in sick twice in six years). The clinic is closed on major holidays (Christmas, New Years, Memorial Day, 4th of July, Labor Day, Thanksgiving), so as long as I don't have hospitalized patients on those days, I don't have to go in.

Finding a position is extremely easy (at least in my locale). Turnover is high in most clinics here so they are constantly hiring.

What's the job like: Being a general practitioner, I get to see a wide variety of cases. My job is basically a mix of performing diagnostics and surgery.

Days are extremely busy, I have almost zero "down time". I rarely get a lunch and if I do it amounts to stuffing my face for 15 minutes while I write charts, read blood work, or call clients back. The clinic opens at 8:30am and I'm arriving at 7:30am to read blood work, review and perform treatments on any hospitalized cases, etc. The clinic closes at 6pm and my last appointment is at 5:30pm. At that point I am finishing writing up charts. I do my best to write charts during the day, but usually I have a ton of charts to complete at the end of the day. I typically leave between 7-7:30pm.

Where I work, they are currently working on expanding hours to opening at 7am and closing somewhere between 8pm and 10pm (undecided yet).

Currently I work four days a week plus one Sunday a month. I have a fixed schedule, which makes me extremely lucky. My one Sunday is the only weekend day I work, but that is extremely rare. Prior to this job I worked all but one weekend per month. Depending on my cases, I often have to read blood work/pathology on my days off and call back clients. I may have to go in on my days off if I have hospitalized patients, but that's not too common.

I have one day scheduled dedicated to surgery, so I do all surgeries on that day. Typical surgery day is spays and neuters, tumor removals, dental cleanings, etc. If I finish surgeries early, then I see walk in appointments for the rest of the day.

The most difficult part of the job is dealing with people, the owners. Not to sound unsympathetic, but most people have no money to spend on treating their animals. I am constantly asked (multiple times every day) for payment plans, discounts, free services, etc. People are rude and will talk on their cell phone during the entire appointment and then ask me at the end (after their call is over) to repeat everything to them AND then call their husband/wife and repeat everything to them (we have a sign that says no cell phones in rooms). Almost every day I have at least one owner who comes in with a dog/cat not eating/losing weight/etc (a diagnostic case which usually requires blood work and x-rays) and says they have $50 (or $75 or $100, usually not much) and we need to "make that work". Owners get upset when they find out you're off the next day and you're transferring the case to another vet (I don't do this for all my cases). Having a life outside work is viewed as having a lack of dedication to the owners/patients.

Your support staff (mainly vet techs) are generally not compensated well, so turnover is high and competence varies. The quality of your support staff has a huge bearing on the number of patients you can see and your stress level.

Clinic owners/managers are breathing down your neck, making you work more, or cutting your pay if you're not meeting your production/billing numbers.

Would you recommend the career to others? Absolutely not. I love working with and helping animals, but after 8 years in school and over 100k in debt (that's low end my undergrad was on a full ride and I went to a very economical in-state school for DVM, some of my colleagues are 300k+), the financial cost/stress cost to benefit just isn't there. I spend at least one night a week crying at my desk wondering what I got myself into when the clinic is closed and I'm writing up charts at 7pm while considering the fact I may be working until 10pm+ at night soon.

Gender: Male

Age: 32

Location: Michigan

Occupation: Information Security Engineer

Education: M.S. Information Assurance, CISSP, CISM, GPEN, GWAPT, GCIH certifications

2012 Compensation: 78k base salary - no bonuses

Future Salary Projection: 1-4% raises, promotions will be 8-10% raises based on how many levels I go up.

Benefits: 25 days PTO which includes sick and holidays. Top of the line Medical/Dental/Vision, 401k match

What's the job like?

The industry as a whole requires you to constantly learn new attacks, defenses, and technologies. Pretty much every night you are on a computer trying to keep up or you will be left behind. The plus side of this is that if your skilled in this industry, you will never have to worry about not having a job. Recruiters call me weekly without even looking for a position.

My days consists of attacking web applications and networks, and reporting my findings to other people. I will also work in compliance, risk management, privacy, incident handling, auditing, and much more.

vegas4x4 said:   This is from my wife. She isn't a techie, so she filled out it out on my account. I didn't see this job in the post and thought it might be interesting to some.

Gender: Female

Age: Early 30s

Location: Las Vegas, NV

Occupation: Veterinarian

Education: DVM (I received early acceptance into a DVM school and didn't actually completely my BS in Biology, but I had completed 90% of it)

2012 Compensation: 85k
.....


I had heard that vets had it bad, but I didn't realize it was this bad. So sorry to hear that.

misterspaghetti said:   vegas4x4 said:   This is from my wife. She isn't a techie, so she filled out it out on my account. I didn't see this job in the post and thought it might be interesting to some.

Gender: Female

Age: Early 30s

Location: Las Vegas, NV

Occupation: Veterinarian

Education: DVM (I received early acceptance into a DVM school and didn't actually completely my BS in Biology, but I had completed 90% of it)

2012 Compensation: 85k
.....



I had heard that vets had it bad, but I didn't realize it was this bad. So sorry to hear that.



85k in Vegas ain't that bad...

vegas4x4 said:   This is from my wife. She isn't a techie, so she filled out it out on my account. I didn't see this job in the post and thought it might be interesting to some.

*snip*


Thanks for sharing!

Has your wife considered going into business with a couple of other vets on their own? I don't know anything about it, really, but my vet is in a practice with two others and she never seems stressed out at all when we see her, and the staff are always polite and seem in good moods. Could just be better management, I suppose.

We have talked about that.

Our area is pretty overrun with vets. One person in particular owns around 10 clinics and is very aggressive with pricing and hours (he employs almost all new graduates and works them to the bone for a few years until they leave, wash, rinse, repeat).

Other factors include that my wife's vet friend co-workers either have no money or have kids and really don't want to undertake the work to open a clinic. And you have to be a bit of a hard ass in the business, some people expect vets to be compassionate towards the animals to the point they will work for free. My wife can defer to the practice manager when they request discounts, free stuff, etc. My wife is a bit of a softie with animals and I'm not sure we wouldn't be giving away the farm if she owned a clinic.

We've looked into opening a mobile vet practice too (none of those in our area). I guess we've just been concerned it might be out of the frying pan and into the fire.

JTausTX said:   
Thanks for sharing!

Has your wife considered going into business with a couple of other vets on their own? I don't know anything about it, really, but my vet is in a practice with two others and she never seems stressed out at all when we see her, and the staff are always polite and seem in good moods. Could just be better management, I suppose.

My history:
2008
2009
2010
2011

bigM in 2011 said: 2011:

Gender, location, occupation, education same (and of course one year older!)
2011 Salary: 130K + 10% bonus, equity options
Future Salary Projection: 2012: ~150K w/promotion hopefully
Benefits: Good. 401K match, medical, dental. Free food, drinks, coffee. I moved but still have a great 12 minute walk to work.
What's the job like? Same as 2010...
Would you recommend the career to others? Yes. Traditional "creative" marketing is pretty saturated but for those with a combination of marketing skills and technical know-how, the sky is the limit.


2012:
Gender, location, occupation, education: m/early 30's, sf bay area, marketing at tech startup, degrees in business and Spanish from top-25 private university
2012 Salary: 1st 6 months: 130K + 10% bonus, equity options. 2nd 6 months: $140K + 10% bonus, equity options
Future Salary Projection: 2012: flat on comp, more options of unknown value
Benefits: Good. 401K match, medical, dental. Free food, drinks, coffee. Unlimited time off. Casual work environment. Changed jobs midway through year, now commuting via train, which is much rougher than before.
What's the job like? Interesting, but can be high stress. Lots of pressure from VCs to perform in a very new industry with a lot of unknowns. If working on a deadline, hours can get nasty but in general its OK. If company has successful exit (VCs are very confident) it could mean a financial windfall personally.
Would you recommend the career to others? Yes. A little tricky to get into this niche of startup marketing but when you do there are always startups and established tech firms looking for the right marketing talent.

Thank you to everyone else for your contributions and best of luck this year!

I am a student finishing up a degree in biology this May and I have found this forum to be so helpful. I've started reading the 2006 thread (I plan to read all of them up to 2012) and I'm glad something like this exists. In school they don't talk too much about careers/jobs. Everything is so hush hush especially when it comes to salary and what one can expect from the job. Thanks for the posts and keep them coming for 2013 and beyond!!

I changed jobs in 2012 and could not have asked for a better opportunity @ http://www.fatwallet.com/forums/finance/1149789/

Gender: M
Age: 33
Location: Georgia
Occupation: Senior Software Developer
Education: MS - Computer Science
2010 Salary: 140K, little stock ( ~10K)
Future Salary Projection: 2013: 2013 w/promotion hopefully ~150K w/options
Benefits: OK. Free food, drinks, coffee. Often Friday lunches on company's dime. I have a great 15 minute commute. No 401K match, 50% coverage for Dependents.
What's the job like? Small team of developers ( 5) working on building a competent product to fight against the big guns. Implementation and Support takes up time but leaves a good sense of achievement when the client sees the benefit of using the system. Almost work 10+ hours every day.
Would you recommend the career to others? Yes. Traditional supply chain calls for huge budgets. With a cloud solution lots of complexity in management of the software is offloaded.

Just had my 1 year review completed last week and salary is increased to 150K and stock options bumped to 100K. could not be happier

my 2011

Gender: M
Gender: Male
Age: 28
Location: Texas
Occupation: Aeronautical Engineer for very large Dept. of Defense (DoD) contractor
Education: BS Aeronautical Engineering
2011 Compensation: $70k + $1k bonus
Future Salary Projection: At same company: 2-3% raise each year, no way to advance upward.
Benefits: Health,dental,vision (that costs $1500 out of pocket for just me), 5% 401(k) matching, ESPP, 4 weeks PTO, no sick leave.
Would you recommend this job to others: Due to politics, I no longer view DoD jobs as stable. But I still recommend to newbie engineers coming out of college to get some type of hands-on job.
Personally my dissatisfaction has pushed me to start looking elsewhere. I try to ignore it, but it just bugs me that the guy in the cube next to me is making the same pay, and 7 times out of 10 when I walk by his cube, he's surfing the internet. I feel like I've put my time in the trenches, and plan to use my performance as a chance to broaden my horizons. I hope to get out of the boondocks, into a smaller company, working on a somewhat independent project. Hopefully getting away from a huge corporation and into a small company with interesting goals will allow me to work with other motivated people. I can't help it, but I feed off of my environment.

Gender: Female

Age: 33

Location: Philly, PA suburb

Occupation: Financial Analyst (private corporation, not public accounting)

Education: B.S. & CPA certification

Length of time in this field: 10 yrs

2010 Compensation: 85k base, 6K bonus

Future Salary Projection: 4.5% increase effective in 3/2013, so 88K base, plus discretionary bonus

Benefits: 18 days PTO, 7 paid holidays, 401K w/ a little match, decent health & dental.

What's the job like? Lots of analysis and playing around in excel. I actually used to be in the accounting department and have since moved to financial analysis. It is way more stressful to be in analysis, because I support a portion of the business and feel very tied to their performance. This company in particular isn't really generous with the raises. 4.5% is above average, but I really felt I deserved a raise rate about twice that with the work I've done in the past year. Opportunities abound, though, so I will stick around.

Would you recommend the career to others? Yes, if you don't mind working in an office environment. The pay is decent and the hours aren't bad.

Gender: Male
Age: Late 20's
Location: Washington, DC
Occupation: IT Systems Architect
Education: High School
Length of time in this field: 14 years

2012 compensation: $144K salary + $83K bonus + $30K stock
Future salary projection: $120K base + $300K shareholder distribution
Benefits: HDHP/HSA health plan (company-paid), $30K pension contribution (company-paid)

What's the job like? Drive up to 100 miles in a day to client sites, sometimes more than 1 in a day. Provide expert-level guidance in designing and implementing niche software solutions that will be utilized by hundreds of thousands of people. Earn the trust of and inspire confidence in CXOs and other high level IT decision makers. Participate in technical discussions that are sometimes contentious and convince others that your approach is the correct one. Troubleshoot and resolve issues that may be disrupting system usability and/or impacting SLAs. Assess and navigate the politics of the client organization.

Would you recommend the career to others? Absolutely, if your personality suits. The hours are long, with 50-60 hour weeks being the norm and the occasional 80 hour week. My 2012 compensation was as an employee of a large consulting firm, but this year I started my own consulting shop - so add several more weekly hours for administration of the business, such as managing contracts and accounting. Although we are currently very profitable and have been forming partnerships with other larger firms, nothing is guaranteed and it's a bit scary to have left a stable job in a large company with great pay for the unknown. That said, I've worked hard to differentiate myself and to earn a reputation as one of the best in my area of expertise. If you're smart, motivated, able to live without 9-5 predictability, and willing to drop everything to help your clients achieve their mission, you might want to consider moving your career in a similar direction.



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