Move to Canada?

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olvrtw said:   people are too comfortable these days. you do know that the earths climate can change wildly at any moment. there are millions of variables that can throw everything out of wack and we'd be in deep doo doo.

I know, right? You should be with me when I say that we should be planning for the threat of an alien invasion. There are millions of uncharted planets and one jerk of an alien population could throw everything here on earth out of whack.

You and me are a lot alike, olvrtw. Irrationally fearing the unexpected, one FWF post at a time.

Compared to US people , how good is Canadian people?

I'm kinda offended

this was funny

actually, the whole topic is. Again: if the energy prices hold up, then Canada may outperform. But keep in mind: the historical norm would be $30-40 oil at best vs. current $95. So a few spikes notwithstanding, the immigrants will eventually be re-emigrating

acroBios said:   Too cold to consider seriously.

For the southern states yes. People living in Northern states have the same weather as Canada. Chicago is as cold as Toronto and windier than Toronto

DesiVibe said:   Chicago is as cold as Toronto and windier than Toronto

And the CPD is colder and windier than the OPP, too.

lotusgardener said:   No, no. The space makes all the difference!

See. THAT's the test they should have posed to the hostages in Argo, "So what's with 2 teams having the same name?"

North of the border you get a range of opinions, some ardently advocating the legitimacy of one versus the other. Some culturally belittling those holding opposing opinions as either elitists or prairie farmers, etc etc

South of the border you just get silence and slack-jawed shocked reactions to the very thought. Once you take the time to explain it to them, of course.

IMO, there really is no better test to tell who is really Canadian and the Roots-wearing pretenders who slapped a maple leaf on their bag in attempts to avoid sticking out as Americans.

BradisBrad said:   olvrtw said:   people are too comfortable these days. you do know that the earths climate can change wildly at any moment. there are millions of variables that can throw everything out of wack and we'd be in deep doo doo.

I know, right? You should be with me when I say that we should be planning for the threat of an alien invasion. There are millions of uncharted planets and one jerk of an alien population could throw everything here on earth out of whack.

You and me are a lot alike, olvrtw. Irrationally fearing the unexpected, one FWF post at a time.
As he comes in from making his latest alien crop circle, lol.

DesiVibe said:   Here is the take from someone that has lived both in US and Canada

US Pros:
1. Everything is DIRT cheap. We dont realize that till we go live somewhere else. Basic needs such as milk costs $4.8 a gallon, Gas is over $5/gallon, bread is $3 a loaf, you get the picture. Car insurance was $100 a month
2. Taxes, what taxes? We pay next to nothing compared to other countries
3. Infrastructure

Canada Pros.
1. Healthcare. People have a misconception that you have to wait hours to see a doctor. Thats not the case.
2. Banking industry. No housing bubble due to very selective lending policies and people paying huge downpayments
3. People are nicer there.


Don't know where you are getting your info. As for US prices, I am paying $3.19/gal for milk, gas is $3.09 and bread is $1.99 loaf for 100% whole wheat. Car insurance varies too much to compare. As to people being nicer in Canada, I can say the people in Montreal are no where near as friendly as San Antonio or Austin having been to Canada and living here in Texas for 15 years - previously in New England.

lonestarguy said:   DesiVibe said:   1. Everything is DIRT cheap. We dont realize that till we go live somewhere else. Basic needs such as milk costs $4.8 a gallon, Gas is over $5/gallon, bread is $3 a loaf, you get the picture. Car insurance was $100 a month

Don't know where you are getting your info. As for US prices, I am paying $3.19/gal for milk, gas is $3.09 and bread is $1.99 loaf for 100% whole wheat. Car insurance varies too much to compare.

I think DesiVibe was giving Canadian prices (not US prices).

I American and I live in Canada. I have a great life. I take advantage of deals on both sides of the border. I can go home without flying over an ocean. I have free health care and almost free tuition. It is currently 3 degrees outside, but I don't need a car and I can get to most places underground.

Also, I live in Montreal and there are nice people and not nice people wherever you go.

Pros Canada: Can finally learn what that stupid game with a stone on the ice(curling) is all about.

SUCKISSTAPLES said:   These Asian investors did not get 100% financing from Canadian banks

They usually pay all cash. So there will not be a banking /foreclosure crisis , they will just hold their properties during a downturn


Hey SIS, would you happen to have a source for this? Not trying to call you. Just genuinely interested as I own real-estate in a Canadian city (I live in it) and data like this would help put my mind at ease.

Best part of Canada is they don't let lunatics like the NRA have guns.

No I don't have stats handy but kloak gave more details about the Vancouver /Toronto phenomenon . This "all cash Asian buyer " phenomenon is also much in play in SF , so I am quite personally familiar with it locally. As I understand it, the same thing is happening in Vancouver and Toronto

kloakndaggers said:   I'm ethnically chinese and while SIS probably can't provide exact stats, EVERY single person that I know from china(a lot hong kong) in canada bought their home with cash.

Most chinese try to get away from china and they go to Canada since their immigration is fairly lax. If it was easier to come to the USA, they would all come to the usa. The ones that do go to Canada are scared of the Chinese gov taking their cash or fortune somehow (communism paranoia but not totally false) . You will not only find a fairly large percentage of chinese in vancouver and toronto, you will see a TON of spoiled kids driving 50k+ cars cruising around. I have one property I did buy in Edmonton about 7 years ago which has worked out well. Although there are lot of asians there as well prices in some parts of Canada are still affordable.

The real estate market in Canada is a lot more stable since their lending is tighter than it was in the USA.

I personally love Vancouver but the weather is a bit chilly. I am in chicago so it isn't exactly that much warmer. If the cost of living was lower, I would be there in a heartbeat. Granville Island, outdoor activities, and driving distance to Seattle are huge pluses for me.

Once you travel to europe, asia, and rest of the world it is amazing how awesome the USA is. Perfect balance of cost of living, cleanliness, opportunity, and fun. Poor people who complain in this country are still "first world problems?



nsdp said:   Best part of Canada is they don't let lunatics like the NRA have guns.

Well, we are only behind U.S. and Norway in gun ownership. Estimate is that there are about 10 million guns in Canada. That
is about 1 for every 3 Canadians. Couldn't tell you much more than that. Not sure what types of firearms are legal or illegal.

funny about Norway. just to show that all those #1surveys and all of this topic is total bs

Canada got better lap dances.

you actually reminded me a real-life story. I don't know how it is today, but it used to be that all nightclubs in Ont would be forced to shut down at 1am, maybe 2am tops. Then another law passed: that the strippers had to keep one shred of clothing on at all times; so they kept the top on

Has anyone had success getting their Canadian credit report established without a SIS #? I'm just wondering if its possible to get a bank account/secured card in person up there(online does seem to be a no-go) that could create history before actually moving? Yes, I have called several banks and the best I've gotten is "maybe", so I'm hoping someone answers who has done it already, or has tried.

infogirlgeek said:   Has anyone had success getting their Canadian credit report established without a SIS #? I'm just wondering if its possible to get a bank account/secured card in person up there(online does seem to be a no-go) that could create history before actually moving? Yes, I have called several banks and the best I've gotten is "maybe", so I'm hoping someone answers who has done it already, or has tried.
Post a pic and you might get to be SIS' #1

RailroadTrack said:   olvrtw said:   Today yahoo had an article with a list of the happiest countries. Norway was #1 Canada was #6, the US was #12. Maybe we can make a list of the Pros/Cons of moving to Canada from the US?

Why be #6 when you can be #1? Move to Norway. Take a coat.

Forget Norway.

DesiVibe said:   Here is the take from someone that has lived both in US and Canada

US Pros:
1. Everything is DIRT cheap. We dont realize that till we go live somewhere else. Basic needs such as milk costs $4.8 a gallon, Gas is over $5/gallon, bread is $3 a loaf, you get the picture. Car insurance was $100 a month
2. Taxes, what taxes? We pay next to nothing compared to other countries
3. Infrastructure

Canada Pros.
1. Healthcare. People have a misconception that you have to wait hours to see a doctor. Thats not the case.
2. Banking industry. No housing bubble due to very selective lending policies and people paying huge downpayments
3. People are nicer there.


Taxes/Healthcare is hard to calculate. We have federal progressive taxes, state progressive taxes, sales tax, property tax, lotsmoretaxes... I pay over $20,000 per year for healthcare for my family here in the US. If my taxes went up $20,000 per year and I had the same coverage then it would be a wash.

The urgent care wait time at my Kaiser Permanente is posted 3-4 hours every time every time I go in. It used to be 30 minutes. So, we wait hours here as well...

burgerwars said:   SinglePapa said:   mind u that visitors from rapidly developing spots such as China marvel at backwardness of our infrastructure, especially NYC/boroughs.

I have to agree with you there. I live in the L.A. area but have been to many foreign countries. The transportation infrastructure can't even be compared. Fortunately I live two miles from work, so it's easy for me to deal with.


The Rail and Subway infrastructure of China is indeed world class, and getting better all the time. High speed trains between all major cities, extensive urban subway lines, mag-lev trains to Shanghai Pudong airport, people-mover in Guangzhou. Much better that the passenger rail system we have in the USA.

However, there are many other forms of infrastructure, and when you consider them all, the scale tilts entirely to the USA.
For example,
Highway and Road infrastructure? USA is far better.
Internet? Don't even ask, China is a disgrace with blocked sites, random censorship and slow speeds. USA takes the cake.
Real Estate? Lots more transparency and information available in the USA. Take your risk and ride a bubble in China.
Pollution? It was crazy bad in Beijing the weekend before last, people getting sick, constant colds or sore throats. Not nice.

In short, the USA still has a lot going for it. People can and do make a living or even a fortune in China; and a lot of foreigners enjoy living there. The Chinese also have a very pro-development and pro-science mindset; cultural factors like this are not unimportant to consider.

SinglePapa said:   funny about Norway. just to show that all those #1surveys and all of this topic is total bs

What do you mean? Aside from the winters, Norway is awesome. Everyone is rich, well-educated, has free healthcare, tons of time off, and they live in one of the safest and most beautiful places in the world.

Personally I'd prefer Sweden or Germany, but Norway is great.

on april 15 2011, the us government unsealed the indictment "united states v. scheinberg", and online poker companies stopped taking business from US customers. this scattered many professional poker players, as they pursued the ability to play poker on the internet by leaving the united states. i have spent roughly 90% of my time in 9 countries outside the US since april 15, 2011, and a significant amount of this time was spent in cities across ontario and quebec on tourist visas.

i prefer ontario to all 7 us states which i had previously lived, and i would live in ontario full time if i could. i love canada! i love the canadian people. i love the canadian land and countryside. i love REAL canadian bacon and maple syrup. i love their local milk and their local beef and farm produce. and i LOVE canadian beer. canadians are proud of their country. in my opinion, they are much more progressive than americans in general. since it's a Hot Topic right now, i note that canada appears to actually take gun safety seriously. they also appear much more progressive on many social fronts. i heard somewhere that prostitution is regulated. they would probably legalize cannabis if not for pressure from the united states. canada's national debt is around 600 billion, and they don't have to support an extensive imperial empire like that of the united states. their defense in conducted primarily through placating their superpower neighbor to the south, with whom it shares a very long and relatively friendly border. although i never sought medical attention for myself, i knew several people across many demographics (including poor and unemployed) who all appeared to receive prompt and adequate medical care for free. southeastern ontario in july and august is SWELTERING without air conditioning. in the spring and fall, the weather is paradisaical. the winter was honestly tolerable, and i noticed no significant difference from michigan.

i have crossed the canada / US border countless times. when i enter canada, they treat me with respect. i am impressed and it makes me feel good. when i enter the united states, they treat me like a criminal and it makes me feel shitty and dislike these effects of the policies of my country. it takes me 5-10 times as long to enter the united states as it takes me to enter canada. i wish i was born in canada. i have an inkling that retirement would come easier and i would receive better care when i am old. i do not have faith in the american social security system for my age bracket, but i don't know enough about the canadian equivalent to make any strong judgement.

i do not believe there are as many opportunities along the lines of the activities which fat walleters are conducting in the united states, as canadian financial institutions do not appear to offer incentives the same way american financial institutions do for whatever reason. i don't know if it is possible to simply move to canada or what the financial implications would be, but spending time in canada is great, and i highly recommend it to anyone who has the opportunity. americans are often allowed 180 days on a tourist visa.

so the reason Norway is #2 in the world in gun ownership (an objective figure) is because it is #1 in citizens' (stated) satisfaction??
JTausTX said:   SinglePapa said:   funny about Norway. just to show that all those #1surveys and all of this topic is total bs

What do you mean? Aside from the winters, Norway is awesome. Everyone is rich, well-educated, has free healthcare, tons of time off, and they live in one of the safest and most beautiful places in the world.

Personally I'd prefer Sweden or Germany, but Norway is great.

My carpet guy (yesss really) moved from Britsh Columbia to San Diego CA to get a higher standard of living in his home-based businessfor the same or less volume. No plans to return after he visited recently and chatted with old pals in Wonderland B.C.

TempName21 said:   


i have crossed the canada / US border countless times. when i enter canada, they treat me with respect. i am impressed and it makes me feel good. when i enter the united states, they treat me like a criminal and it makes me feel shitty and dislike these effects of the policies of my country. it takes me 5-10 times as long to enter the united states as it takes me to enter canada.


I couldnt Agree more to this. Every time I cross the border to go to Canada by road or flight, I am greeted with a smile and Welcome to Canada. They have simple questions, where are you going, for how long, any tobbacco or alcohol, any fire arms, see my passport and are like Welcome to Canada

US Side cannot be more different, they treat you like criminals, even after living in the US for over 12 years, they question the intent of why I have travelled to Canada and what am I bringing in with me.

That's all easy to explain when you are not a primary target.

DesiVibe said:   TempName21 said:   


i have crossed the canada / US border countless times. when i enter canada, they treat me with respect. i am impressed and it makes me feel good. when i enter the united states, they treat me like a criminal and it makes me feel shitty and dislike these effects of the policies of my country. it takes me 5-10 times as long to enter the united states as it takes me to enter canada.


I couldnt Agree more to this. Every time I cross the border to go to Canada by road or flight, I am greeted with a smile and Welcome to Canada. They have simple questions, where are you going, for how long, any tobbacco or alcohol, any fire arms, see my passport and are like Welcome to Canada

US Side cannot be more different, they treat you like criminals, even after living in the US for over 12 years, they question the intent of why I have travelled to Canada and what am I bringing in with me.
I used to go across the boarder every other weekend and the only two times I got harassed was by the Canadians.

DesiVibe said:   TempName21 said:   


i have crossed the canada / US border countless times. when i enter canada, they treat me with respect. i am impressed and it makes me feel good. when i enter the united states, they treat me like a criminal and it makes me feel shitty and dislike these effects of the policies of my country. it takes me 5-10 times as long to enter the united states as it takes me to enter canada.


I couldnt Agree more to this. Every time I cross the border to go to Canada by road or flight, I am greeted with a smile and Welcome to Canada. They have simple questions, where are you going, for how long, any tobbacco or alcohol, any fire arms, see my passport and are like Welcome to Canada

US Side cannot be more different, they treat you like criminals, even after living in the US for over 12 years, they question the intent of why I have travelled to Canada and what am I bringing in with me.


I've heard this same thing from multiple people.

investnoob said:   SUCKISSTAPLES said:   These Asian investors did not get 100% financing from Canadian banks

They usually pay all cash. So there will not be a banking /foreclosure crisis , they will just hold their properties during a downturn


Hey SIS, would you happen to have a source for this? Not trying to call you. Just genuinely interested as I own real-estate in a Canadian city (I live in it) and data like this would help put my mind at ease.

This CBC article says that :

"Just how pervasive foreign ownership of Canadian real estate is, however, is hard to establish since neither the government nor the real estate industry collects official data on the subject and buyers often use local proxies. Informal polls of realtors in Metro Vancouver and the Greater Toronto Area by industry associations and the media have reported figures as varied as 3.5 per cent and 20 per cent for the percentage of housing sales that involve buyers from outside Canada"

But they don't say much about whether the foreigners use financing or all cash.

Realtor.org has a report that discusses foreign buyers of US property. FOr 12 months ending March '12 there was $82B in real estate bought by foreigners out of $928B


edit : Also note that Canadians were the #1 foreign buyer of US properties. China #2 and Mexico #3.

SinglePapa said:   so the reason Norway is #2 in the world in gun ownership (an objective figure) is because it is #1 in citizens' (stated) satisfaction??
JTausTX said:   SinglePapa said:   funny about Norway. just to show that all those #1surveys and all of this topic is total bs

What do you mean? Aside from the winters, Norway is awesome. Everyone is rich, well-educated, has free healthcare, tons of time off, and they live in one of the safest and most beautiful places in the world.

Personally I'd prefer Sweden or Germany, but Norway is great.


What exactly are you implying? Gun ownership is very high in Norway primarily because of the many hunters and sportsmen who live there. Handguns are comparatively rare, and firearms are heavily regulated. It is very very difficult to obtain a license to own a weapon strictly for self-defense, and their law requires at least a critical piece of the weapon to be securely stored in the home when not in use.

i hope no one confuses "the crossing" treatment with "everyday" treatment, cause they are (in fact) NEGATIVELY corelated

ZenNUTS said:   I used to go across the boarder every other weekend and the only two times I got harassed was by the Canadians.

That's because the Canadians have zero tolerance for bad spellers.

gradsaver said:   I American and I live in Canada. I have a great life. I take advantage of deals on both sides of the border. I can go home without flying over an ocean. I have free health care and almost free tuition. It is currently 3 degrees outside, but I don't need a car and I can get to most places underground.

Couldn't tell that you were a native english speaker. Born or migrated US citizen?

BenH said:   ZenNUTS said:   I used to go across the boarder every other weekend and the only two times I got harassed was by the Canadians.

That's because the Canadians have zero tolerance for bad spellers.
eH?

Another thing that Canada beats US in hands down, NO CASH JOBS. If you dont have a SIN (Canadian version of SSN), you will not get a job. There are some exceptions but much lower than US.



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