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hebron1427 said:   delivering mail to rural communities is usually not done by the USPS itself, but is typically outsourced to someone local to that area--i.e., joe the plumber who puts a USPS sticker on the side of his car 4 days a week and drives the mail around.
Is joe plumber doing this out of the goodness of his heart? I am pretty sure USPS needs to pay for this. The point is, USPS cannot charge extra for these deliveries --- same rate across town or across country to rural Idaho.

rmhop said:   they need to quit giving massive discounts to junk mailers who do nothing but spam consumers and only charge them like 19 cents or so.USPS doesn't get to decide whether a shipper gets a discount or not based on the contents of the mailing or because they deem a mailing to be "junk mail." That has always been illegal.

USPS does offer bulk mail rates because the shippers "do some of the work that otherwise would have to be done by the Postal Service (for example, sorting the mail by ZIP Code or transporting the mail to a destination postal facility). Everyone benefits from this "work-sharing." Mailers make an investment in time and technology, the Postal Service’s costs are reduced and you pay less postage" (USPS bulk mail explanation)

They also need to quit giving away free priority mail boxes. people load up on these free boxes and they go unused...this has to cost USPS tons of money.I don't know whether it makes business sense for them or not but you can't look at it like that. It is like focusing on the number of BOA's ATM's and saying that these ATM's cost BOA a ton of money and that BOA should just shut them all down. The issue is that a ton of BOA's customers are with BOA because of its ATM network... take it away, and BOA loses way more money than it saves. It's entirely possible that it works the same way with USPS and that giving away free priority mail boxes greatly increases USPS' profitability because priority mail is a higher profit margin product.

Glitch99 said:   doveroftke said:   One potential solution that I like would be to deliver mail to businesses five days a week, to residences three days (Mon, Wed, Fri or Tues, Thurs, Sat, depending on the route), and deliver packages and premium services (Priority and up) every day.
I've always thought this as well. Alternate-day delivering should result in half the labor costs, since one carrier would cover 2 routes. In all reality, 2x/week delivery (meaning 3 routes per carrier) probably would be sufficient.

Only I'd include businesses in this as well - but let them (and anyone else) pay a monthly fee for daily delivery. Same with priority/packages - it goes out on the next scheduled delivery unless you pay a surcharge for ASAP delivery.
if they would weed out all the junk/spam mail they could deliver regular mail just a few days a week. My parents do stuff the old school way and get bills in the mail on everything. about 80% of their mail is all junk as well. They were out of town for an extended period of time and i had to get their mail to let them know about bills etc. PITA i know. but they would go weeks without getting a bill....but everyday have 10-12 pieces of junk mail. i think 2-3 times like you said should work.

They need to run the postal service like a business rather than a charitable organization designed to enrich the postal union workers.

I found an online database where I could search local postal workers salaries... I couldn't find anyone earning less than 65K a year with crazy pension benefits and health care plans. Mind you, many of these jobs require three days of training and could be fulfilled by high school students.

Another issue is they aren't allowed to increase the cost of stamps more than the CPI. I think the CPI is nonsense designed to hide inflation, but regardless of your views their costs are going up at a rate much, much faster than the CPI particularly for things like fuel. On the revenue side mail is declining and they will have less sales to cover their high fixed costs. The USPS has not reduced its staff to compensate for the 50% drop in mail since 2000 or technological improvements that require less people to deliver mail. The result is that stamp prices will increase dramatically.

I think I'll be getting the last laugh though... I estimated how many stamps I would use over the rest of my life and bought about $500 in forever stamps. I'm sure the USPS will be jacking up their prices significantly. Given the history of bailouts in the US there is zero chance that the USPS will go bankrupt.

No other business could offer a "forever" product without going bankrupt. The USPS loves forever stamps because they record revenue from forever stamps today and spend the money but don't have to provide services until the future... meaning for them it is the ultimate accounting gimmick and will be a huge problem for them in the future. Think about what would happen to gas stations if they offered to sell a forever gallon of gasoline... only the government is dumb enough to make such a risky proposition.

hebron1427 said:   i'm pretty sure the US attorney prosecutes mail fraud, not the post office.United States Postal Inspection Service.

and is there really a reason for them to deliver government correspondence for free?Other than the fact that the government makes them do this?

delivering mail to rural communities is usually not done by the USPS itself, but is typically outsourced to someone local to that area--i.e., joe the plumber who puts a USPS sticker on the side of his car 4 days a week and drives the mail around.... which still costs USPS a ton of money. My point is that you can't complain that USPS doesn't run itself as a private business when we don't want to let it run itself as a private business.

rmhop said:   alamo11 said:   rmhop said:   alamo11 said:   rmhop said:   ganda said:   rmhop said:   they need to quit giving massive discounts to junk mailers who do nothing but spam consumers and only charge them like 19 cents or so. They also need to quit giving away free priority mail boxes. people load up on these free boxes and they go unused...this has to cost USPS tons of money. What other shipping service provides free materials?

UPS and FedEx do.

We don't have the Marines to turn a profit, nor the interstates, nor schools - they are good for our society and we'd be poorer as a society if we lost them.

The USPS does need to fire some of the appalling employees they have - 4 or 5 in my local PO need to be shitcanned ASAP, the lazy job-for-lifers.
UPS and FedEx give free shipping materials??? since when? within the last 6 months?



No.. since ever. I've been getting free shipping label paper from UPS for over three years now. Just cut the UPS logo off and you are good to go.
i'm talking boxes, tape, etc. you can't just walk into a UPS or FedEx and get free materials to drop your item in and ship.


"UPS packaging is provided free of charge to UPS account holders for selected Air and Worldwide Express services. Other packaging supplies are sold at The UPS Store® and UPS Customer Center locations."



Right, however all you need to get an account is just a credit card to verify your address
yeah but you are talking for overnight or worldwide shipments. You can't drop into a UPS store and throw something in a free box and ship it ground....which is what priority mail is the equivalent of.


Priority Mail is much faster than Ground. Parcel Post would be the equivalent of Ground, which does not provide free packaging.

My take: I hate the idea of dropping Saturday delivery. The world is shrinking and I get a LOT of deliveries from countries like China, Singapore, India etc. Often these have to be signed for. Because I work 9-5 I am usually only available to receive packages on Saturday. Why not drop Tuesday, Wednesday or Thursday instead?

hkgfnt said:   I am not saying good or bad. Canada Post does not deliver mail on Saturdays. They also allow small businesses like your neighborhood pharmacies to get a license as a mini post office. Why not give that a try?We pretty much have that now. The convenience store right across the street from my work offers full USPS package services, and packages sometimes actually go out faster when shipped from there, since the local PO closes at 5 and the last pickup at the convenience store is 6 p.m.


Isn't part of their solvency problem is related to funding the ridiculously generous federal worker-like pension?


Pension is not insanely generous, though it is similar to other federal employees. It is insanely (unneccesarily) lavishly funded.

As far as the postal employees observed "goofing off," it's important to understand that some postal employees are, in fact, employees of the USPS but a growing number are independent contractors. Generally I'm a fan of unions but I think under the present circumstances it's worth it to force the two main postal unions to agree to allow the postal service to step up privatization of routes, especially in urban areas. It's a tough decision, but newspapers moved toward this model over the past 20 years or so and it's saved a TON of money.

hebron1427 said:   ey prosecutes mail fraud, not the post office. and is there really a reason for them to deliver government correspondence for free? delivering mail to rural communities is usually not done by the USPS itself, but is typically outsourced to someone local to that area--i.e., joe the plumber who puts a USPS sticker on the side of his car 4 days a week and drives the mail around.

USPS has its own inspectors and attorneys/prosecutors but some cases are shifted to the U.S. attorney's office when there are other federal crimes involved.

beatme said:   Maybe some employee quality metrics would help. Before we bring on the Newman references, let me just say that I see UPS guys busting their butts all the time, and I regularly see USPS carriers napping in their cars.

I don't have personal knoledge. But, from people who worked there, I've heard that it's not a pleasant place to work. It might be different out of the NYC area (where the people worked), but I won't pre-judge something I don't have personal experience with.

brettdoyle said:   No other business could offer a "forever" product without going bankrupt. The USPS loves forever stamps because they record revenue from forever stamps today and spend the money but don't have to provide services until the future... meaning for them it is the ultimate accounting gimmick and will be a huge problem for them in the future. Think about what would happen to gas stations if they offered to sell a forever gallon of gasoline... only the government is dumb enough to make such a risky proposition.Perhaps. Or perhaps it makes business sense for the same reason that retailers love selling gift cards, including those that never expire: please of people lose them, misplace them and forget to redeem them. I bet a significant number of the forever stamps holders suffer the same fate.

I also suspect that when you factor in the time value of money and opportunity costs associated with all these forever stamps purchases that don't get redeemed for years and years, it wouldn't be shocking to have the USPS coming out on top. This is especially true if the USPS continues to be forbidden from increasing stamp costs faster than CPI increases.

scrouds said:   Now I have a question for you guys. Why do we expect the post office to cover its costs? We build roads without any expectation that the roads will cover their cost. Gas taxes pay for 1/2 of road costs. Where's the other half coming from? Why do roads deserve to be subsidized and the mail not?

None of it deserves to be subsidized. This is the problem across our economy. Everybody expects everything to be available below cost. This is how we get massive government debt at all levels of government. USPS needs to get its cost structure in line with its revenue structure.

I heard today that the government subsidizes the $16 hamburger on Amtrak by an additional $6. Why on earth am I paying for some schlub on Amtrak to get a discounted hamburger.

all postal office workers' salaries

http://php.app.com/usps/search.php

* it's public information because they're federal employees.

Laker312 said:   The average salary for a mailman in my zip code is $95,346. I wonder if that is part of the problem???

a random sampling shows salaries capped @ ~$57k, with the exceptions being supervisors, managers, and postmasters.

HSimpson101 said:   scrouds said:   Now I have a question for you guys. Why do we expect the post office to cover its costs? We build roads without any expectation that the roads will cover their cost. Gas taxes pay for 1/2 of road costs. Where's the other half coming from? Why do roads deserve to be subsidized and the mail not?

None of it deserves to be subsidized. This is the problem across our economy. Everybody expects everything to be available below cost. This is how we get massive government debt at all levels of government. USPS needs to get its cost structure in line with its revenue structure.
If you don't subsidize essential infrastructure, then the entire economy suffers and all of us suffer a lot more as a result. If you don't subsidize the roads, gas prices skyrocket, which dampens the rate of economic growth, which leads to lower wages, more unemployment and less tax revenue. Here is a report showing that traffic congestion in Orlando cost nearly $1 billion in 2011. In Denver, it is $1.6 billion. The total financial cost of congestion in 2011 was $121 billion, up one billion dollars from the year before and translating to $818 per U.S. commuter. Of that total, about $27 billion worth was wasted time and Diesel fuel from trucks moving goods on the system (link).

I agree that there's plenty of waste and inefficiency out there but you can't evaluate these things the way that a frog evaluates the world from the bottom of a well. The relationship between many of these costs and benefits just cannot be evaluated the way that you are doing it.

tjguitar85 said:   rmhop said:   alamo11 said:   rmhop said:   alamo11 said:   rmhop said:   ganda said:   rmhop said:   they need to quit giving massive discounts to junk mailers who do nothing but spam consumers and only charge them like 19 cents or so. They also need to quit giving away free priority mail boxes. people load up on these free boxes and they go unused...this has to cost USPS tons of money. What other shipping service provides free materials?

UPS and FedEx do.

We don't have the Marines to turn a profit, nor the interstates, nor schools - they are good for our society and we'd be poorer as a society if we lost them.

The USPS does need to fire some of the appalling employees they have - 4 or 5 in my local PO need to be shitcanned ASAP, the lazy job-for-lifers.
UPS and FedEx give free shipping materials??? since when? within the last 6 months?



No.. since ever. I've been getting free shipping label paper from UPS for over three years now. Just cut the UPS logo off and you are good to go.
i'm talking boxes, tape, etc. you can't just walk into a UPS or FedEx and get free materials to drop your item in and ship.


"UPS packaging is provided free of charge to UPS account holders for selected Air and Worldwide Express services. Other packaging supplies are sold at The UPS Store® and UPS Customer Center locations."



Right, however all you need to get an account is just a credit card to verify your address
yeah but you are talking for overnight or worldwide shipments. You can't drop into a UPS store and throw something in a free box and ship it ground....which is what priority mail is the equivalent of.


Priority Mail is much faster than Ground. Parcel Post would be the equivalent of Ground, which does not provide free packaging.
parcel post is crazy slow. in my experience from shipping thousands of packages....priority mail is not really 1-3 days like they advertise....more like 4-5. sure 1-3 if you live pretty close but not across the country.

cows123 said:   beatme said:   Maybe some employee quality metrics would help. Before we bring on the Newman references, let me just say that I see UPS guys busting their butts all the time, and I regularly see USPS carriers napping in their cars.

I don't have personal knoledge. But, from people who worked there, I've heard that it's not a pleasant place to work. It might be different out of the NYC area (where the people worked), but I won't pre-judge something I don't have personal experience with.


I have done some work as a "casual" (USPS term for "temp.") Only job I ever had where I was asked by a supervisor to work more slowly.

LawDawgAtl said:   hebron1427 said:   i'm pretty sure the US attorney prosecutes mail fraud, not the post office.United States Postal Inspection Service.
from your website: "Inspectors work closely with U.S. Attorneys"

and is there really a reason for them to deliver government correspondence for free?Other than the fact that the government makes them do this? yes, other than that, is there a reason?

delivering mail to rural communities is usually not done by the USPS itself, but is typically outsourced to someone local to that area--i.e., joe the plumber who puts a USPS sticker on the side of his car 4 days a week and drives the mail around.... which still costs USPS a ton of money. My point is that you can't complain that USPS doesn't run itself as a private business when we don't want to let it run itself as a private business. not asking that it run itself as a private business--just that it not piss money down the drain.

Not sure if buying forever stamps is such a good idea... you are paying full price for what will be a lower level of service.

And if you're considering competing with the post office make sure you include that ridiculous requirement to fully fund now retirement accounts for people not yet born.. who will someday work their careers with USPS and then eventually retire some 50+ years from now.... The post office wouldn't be 'losing money' without that $11billion yearly financial burden..

LawDawgAtl said:   brettdoyle said:   No other business could offer a "forever" product without going bankrupt. The USPS loves forever stamps because they record revenue from forever stamps today and spend the money but don't have to provide services until the future... meaning for them it is the ultimate accounting gimmick and will be a huge problem for them in the future. Think about what would happen to gas stations if they offered to sell a forever gallon of gasoline... only the government is dumb enough to make such a risky proposition.Perhaps. Or perhaps it makes business sense for the same reason that retailers love selling gift cards, including those that never expire: please of people lose them, misplace them and forget to redeem them. I bet a significant number of the forever stamps holders suffer the same fate.

I also suspect that when you factor in the time value of money and opportunity costs associated with all these forever stamps purchases that don't get redeemed for years and years, it wouldn't be shocking to have the USPS coming out on top. This is especially true if the USPS continues to be forbidden from increasing stamp costs faster than CPI increases.



There is zero chance the post office will come out ahead unless they are able to default on their obligations or the stamps get burned in a fire. Either they are forced to raise their prices much higher or their costs to deliver the letters goes up significantly. Their costs will continue to rise much faster than the inflation rate so as they deliver those 1,000 or so letters over my lifetime(I am young) it will cost them many times greater.

I kept my receipts in order to track my cost basis, so it should be interesting to track what happens over the years.

wordgirl said:   My take: I hate the idea of dropping Saturday delivery. The world is shrinking and I get a LOT of deliveries from countries like China, Singapore, India etc. Often these have to be signed for. Because I work 9-5 I am usually only available to receive packages on Saturday. Why not drop Tuesday, Wednesday or Thursday
The bread guys get it right.... Ever notice how your grocery store is rather bare on Wednesday, but well-stocked Saturday afternoon?

Xnarg1 said:   Maybe if the USPS wasn't mandated to pay >$5 billion per year to fund retirement/healthcare for its employees, 75 years into the future, its financial outlook would be better.

Bingo. Congress mandated that the USPS prepay 75 years of retirement benefits in just ten years in 2006. So now they are forced to pay $5.5 billion every year to do so. No other government or private agency is required to do this. Eliminate this requirement and you fix the whole problem (at least the financial one - I do agree that postal unions need some work). Here's a pretty good link to information about it.

Some more info... according to this editorial, 80% of the USPS's losses can be directly attributed to the PAEA. If they hadn't had to make those payments (instead paying for it as other agencies do), they would have a $1.5 billion surplus as of Sept 2011 [source].

For whatever reason, since 2006 it seems as though Congress is intentionally destroying the USPS. This is probably because the unions are some of the strongest in the nation, but I suppose I can't make that claim. But they are forcing them to adhere to ridiculous standards shared by no other agency while simultaneously not allowing them to take proactive steps to solve the problem. I read while looking for the links above that there's some debate over whether they can even stop Saturday delivery, since it's a Congressional mandate. So they're basically screwed no matter what unless Congress changes something.

rmhop said:   ganda said:   rmhop said:   they need to quit giving massive discounts to junk mailers who do nothing but spam consumers and only charge them like 19 cents or so. They also need to quit giving away free priority mail boxes. people load up on these free boxes and they go unused...this has to cost USPS tons of money. What other shipping service provides free materials?

UPS and FedEx do.

We don't have the Marines to turn a profit, nor the interstates, nor schools - they are good for our society and we'd be poorer as a society if we lost them.

The USPS does need to fire some of the appalling employees they have - 4 or 5 in my local PO need to be shitcanned ASAP, the lazy job-for-lifers.
UPS and FedEx give free shipping materials??? since when? within the last 6 months?


Since forever. I have a pile of them sitting right here so they're on hand when I need them. I didn't pay a penny for them. I just order them from UPS and they get delivered, free, the next day. USPS free boxes take about a week to arrive.

Also, they're going to continue delivering packages and "medicine" on Saturdays? So where's the real savings, if there is still going to be people on the road? Sort facilities are still going to be sorting the same piece count, which is going to take the same amount of time be it spread over 6 days or 5.

Switch back to paper statements. Pay all your bills by check. Mail in multiple payments. Open up a zillion more bank and credit accounts, and insist on paper statements. Mail letters instead of email or the phone. Forget about "going green" because it's making the Post Office "go red." If we start writing checks and insist on everything sent to you by mail, we can chop down more trees and save the Post Office! Lets do it!

brettdoyle said:   


I think I'll be getting the last laugh though... I estimated how many stamps I would use over the rest of my life and bought about $500 in forever stamps. I'm sure the USPS will be jacking up their prices significantly. Given the history of bailouts in the US there is zero chance that the USPS will go bankrupt.



A real FWer would have bought them at Costco and got the 25c discount per 100.

hebron1427 said:   i'm pretty sure the US attorney prosecutes mail fraud, not the post office. and is there really a reason for them to deliver government correspondence for free? delivering mail to rural communities is usually not done by the USPS itself, but is typically outsourced to someone local to that area--i.e., joe the plumber who puts a USPS sticker on the side of his car 4 days a week and drives the mail around.Absolutely not true, USPS has their own investigators - Office of Inspector General

I've dealt with one last fall - he was very professional; try that with private shippers

rmhop said:   they need to quit giving massive discounts to junk mailers who do nothing but spam consumers and only charge them like 19 cents or so. They also need to quit giving away free priority mail boxes. people load up on these free boxes and they go unused...this has to cost USPS tons of money. What other shipping service provides free materials?

It's 2013....people don't use regular mail all that much and people who ship packages don't really use USPS. I used priority mail all the time when doing eBay stuff, but most people go to UPS/FedEx etc. 95% of mail that we get at our house is pure junk. Every bill we get in email. When spam snail mail slows down, USPS will definitely go under.
Bulk mail is a profitable, the most profitable area of USPS

Really, people don't use USPS on eBay? 90%+ of my buying comes via USPS, all small sellers use it. UPS/FedEx prices only competitive when you get a volume discount, i.e. when you're a large business, trust me - every time I run comparisons private shipper's prices were up in stratosphere.

Incidentally, if that 19th century behemoth of USPS yuppies of 21st century love to hate would not exist - most of lower-end eCommerce wouldn't be around.

The irony is - USPS had been subsidizing most of eCommerce for the last 15 years...

Of all the ways the US govt wastes our money, bailing out the postal service is relatively inoffensive

Excellent idea.

Who needs post office any way?

1. Sending regular letters? Who does that?
2. Packages. Ok, I can see that. Plus there is UPS, FedEx, and a slew of other services,
3. Express mail using envelopes. Ok, but FedEx and UPS also have serious game.
4. Spam? Check. USPS is your friend, Spammers.
5. Wedding invitations. Use the internet. Save paper. Save postage.

About 90% of the stuff handled and delivered by USPS can either be eliminated or is useless or adds zero value to the society.

the problem with your thinking is that you have accepted, without question, the talking heads' assertion that the post office must turn a profit.
the government does important things that are not profitable. mail delivery is one of them.
i do all my postage through usps. there are pros and cons with that, but overall the pros outweigh the cons by a lot.
and if it costs us all an extra few cents or dollars each year to have usps, well i guess thats a few less cheeseburges for me over the course of a year.

hebron1427 said:   anyone interested in opening a private post office system to compete with usps? if the answer is no, that should tell you what you need to know about the usps business model

You're right. It's a business model where the business is held responsible for the business result, but not allowed to change the parameters of the business as a part of the business need. (And some of the same politicians who excoriate the USPS for losing money are the same ones who demand every day delivery in sparsely populated areas, etc.)

In a real world business, these items require extra paid-for feeds, for 3 day delivery, for Saturday delivery, etc.

So, it's not that this can't be made a successful business, but you'd have to change some parameters -- dropping Saturday delivery is a good first step!

brettdoyle said:   They need to run the postal service like a business rather than a charitable organization designed to enrich the postal union workers.


I fully agree with this. The USPS window workers are one of the slowest, lazies, less efficient, and entitled workers in the US.

Down with all of them.

I hope in 20-30 years, USPS, as an entity will not exist. I will pay to see that day.

I am very familiar with their healthcare funding problems. Analyzing how state governments are failing to pre-fund their retirement and healthcare obligations actually funded the first year of my PhD in Public Administration (thanks, taxpayers!). The USPS is in a most peculiar situation because its considered an autonomous independent business by the government yet it still is subject to government oversight. When congress ordered USPS to pre-fund its obligations, it was actually doing the smart thing. Like most states, USPS previously funded retirement healthcare on a "pay as you go" method where the expected bill for the upcoming budget year was paid for and future unfunded obligations were ignored and not truly accounted for on the books. Thats due to the magic of public sector accounting - these unfunded liabilities (all the money they will owe their retirees in the future in healthcare expenses) is not something the USPS had to pay attention to. Congress forced their hand, which on the surface seems like a bad idea but its actually quite smart for the following reasons:

The problem with "pay as you go" is that those healthcare (and pension) obligations are near their lowest point right now in terms of yearly cost, and will only explode in the future. In the case of USPS, those liabilites had a potential to grow to become such a large portion of their budget that the cost would cripple them. It would be impossible to still run the USPS and pay off the retirees. Prepaying those liabilities saves them money in the long run, because those funds are invested and the growth and compounding of those funds will eventually be enough to sustain the ever growing amount demanded by the healthcare liabilities - but doing this requires huge upfront payments to prepay those obligations...they have been ignored for so long.

What I find most interesting about the discussion of this in the media is that this is a harbinger of whats going to happen to state governments across the country very soon. Most states use pay go, and most of them face the same problem of basically ignoring their unfunded liability of retiree healthcare. The unfunded liabilities owed by most states are enormous and dwarf the USPS. And when it comes to states, they will have to be paid - lawyers for most state retirement systems already seem to agree that any cut in promised benefits would be an entitlement cut that would get slapped down by the courts. States who use pay as you go are trapped with a ticking time bomb that will go off in the next 10-15 years - and the majority of state governments have done nothing to stop it. In many ways the USPS is more fortunate, if they can prepay now they will be in much better shape in the future, which presumably will be good as use of normal mail continues to decline.

If we would stop giving our money away to other countries and get out of this war we would have plenty of $$$.
Start charging companies who send bill statements by email, so they "can go green". BS. So they can save money.

The thing is you can't just make radical reforms to the union. They have a collective bargaining agreement, and its rock solid. I am pretty familiar with the version from about two years ago because I was on a regional USPS arbitration panel, so I had to become very familiar with parts of the contract that come up most often with grievances.

Those agreements are locked in for 4-5 year periods at a time, and from a management perspective, you just aren't going to be able to do much while its in effect. Love or hate the postal union, one thing they are very good at is filing unfair labor practice charges with the National Labor Board.

beatme said:   Maybe some employee quality metrics would help. Before we bring on the Newman references, let me just say that I see UPS guys busting their butts all the time, and I regularly see USPS carriers napping in their cars.

UPS delivers to how many people in your neighborhood each day ? 2? 3?
USPS delivers to everyone every day pretty much.

tolamapS said:   brettdoyle said:   They need to run the postal service like a business rather than a charitable organization designed to enrich the postal union workers.


I hope in 20-30 years, USPS, as an entity will not exist. I will pay to see that day.


"Daddy?
Yes, son...
I heard grandma used to send you $10 for your birthday growing up. That sounds so cool! Whatever happened to that?"


"My dearest wife,
Today wasn't too bad. They delivered dry socks, and I got your letter in the mail. It's good to hear the family is fine, and the kids are doing well in school. Some of the guys are gathering money for Mrs. Johnson. Teddy Johnson took a round to the head and we're all pretty shook up about it. Please watch for our package and drop it by when you receive it. All my love, Maj. Ed Withers"


Neither of the above work well on 'the internet', and no one frames an email. I'd say some things that are mailed are practically priceless.

Does everyone realize that pretty much every country, even in Europe, has privatized their post office and it works just fine? Why should we subsidize something that has already been proven many times over to work just fine without a subsidy? Why should our post office be another welfare scheme where taxpayers fund actual users of the service?

Based on my visits to many other countries, the USPS seems to be the only post system that offers just postal services. In many other countries, post offices are also offering full fledged banking services. Australia Post, for example, even sells foreign exchange in many locations. Given the reach of the USPS, I am surprised it has been not been used fully for service distribution of various types in under-served locations.

The USPS should **NOT** be operated "like a business." If it did, it would drop out of all the unprofitable rural areas that aren't cost effective for UPS and FedEx to deliver to, either. The USPS provides a valuable service especially to rural areas, at an amazing price.

It SHOULD be subsidized to some degree, if need be.

It SHOULD NOT be required to pre-fund its pension plan for the next 75 years. Are UPS and FedEx doing that? Why not?

ahallfatwallett said:   

It SHOULD NOT be required to pre-fund its pension plan for the next 75 years. Are UPS and FedEx doing that? Why not?


If the USPS doesn't prefund now, you won't have a USPS in the next 20 years. Also, you can't compare them to UPS and FedEx, neither of those promised the astronomical retirement healthcare benefits that the USPS did. Thus, they don't have the same problem.

I have had a moderate amoung of success challenging catalogs via: Catalog Choice



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