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Perhaps overpayment of a property tax bill could result in a rebate check?

It seems clear that the person who alleged voter fraud cannot substantiate their claims. That said, they may be right about reporting the charge to the FBI or to the Secret Service. Here's why: the donation was probably for an event that put the donor into contact with the President, the First Lady, or some other important member of the administration. If so, the purpose of the donation was likely in furtherance of some greater scam. I.e., hey, look at me, I hobnob with the President, therefore my ponzi scheme is of great value. Also, if the individual's goal was to get close to the President, the Secret Service may be interested.

Or maybe that obscuring the identity of a campaign donor is a violation of federal campaign finance law and should be reported to the FEC.

glxpass said:   Glitch99 said:   glxpass said:   dcwilbur said:   KYBOSH said:   I dont think this is a mistake (like mis-typing the CC number).
Unless they also mistyped the corresponding billing zipcode and got it right.
Your zip code is not needed to process a credit card charge.
That's true for in-person purchases. In fact, it's against the law in California for a merchant to request the purchaser's zip code. See http://www.sfgate.com/business/article/Stores-can-t-ask-for-ZIP-...For online purchases though, I think billing zip code is used for verification.
Depends on the merchant, and the level of verification they pay for. Alot of times, just the card number and expiration date is all that is needed, sometimes the CID number on the back, and sometimes address.
IME, every online purchase I've made has required at the minimum credit card number, expiration date, and some personal information, such as zip code, phone number, or full billing address. A taxi driver asked for phone number. Interestingly, that was apparently enough for Square to send a receipt to my e-mail address, which I didn't provide.

ETA, it's possible that Square already had my e-mail address linked to the payment card from prior transactions with that card and Square.
I was just billed by a merchant that I have never done business with before, and I know for a fact that the company did not have my mailing address, telephone number, or the verification code from the card. Folks, merchants may use additional data to verify your account, but it is most certainly not a requirement.

dcwilbur said:   glxpass said:   Glitch99 said:   glxpass said:   dcwilbur said:   KYBOSH said:   I dont think this is a mistake (like mis-typing the CC number).
Unless they also mistyped the corresponding billing zipcode and got it right.
Your zip code is not needed to process a credit card charge.
That's true for in-person purchases. In fact, it's against the law in California for a merchant to request the purchaser's zip code. See http://www.sfgate.com/business/article/Stores-can-t-ask-for-ZIP-...For online purchases though, I think billing zip code is used for verification.
Depends on the merchant, and the level of verification they pay for. Alot of times, just the card number and expiration date is all that is needed, sometimes the CID number on the back, and sometimes address.
IME, every online purchase I've made has required at the minimum credit card number, expiration date, and some personal information, such as zip code, phone number, or full billing address. A taxi driver asked for phone number. Interestingly, that was apparently enough for Square to send a receipt to my e-mail address, which I didn't provide.

ETA, it's possible that Square already had my e-mail address linked to the payment card from prior transactions with that card and Square.
I was just billed by a merchant that I have never done business with before, and I know for a fact that the company did not have my mailing address, telephone number, or the verification code from the card. Folks, merchants may use additional data to verify your account, but it is most certainly not a requirement.


For instance, Amazon payments can process a CC charge with only the number and exp date. They don't ask for the security code, and they don't verify address/phone#.

Glitch, dcwilbur, SpeedingLunatic, thanks for the data points.

Yeah, this is one of the things that everyone just assumes is a requirement but it all depends on the merchant AND the payment processor they're using. Back in the earlier days of the internet there were tons of payment processors companies I worked with made use of all over the world that required ZERO scrubbing. While our sites were mostly aboveboard there were plenty that used the same processors we did for younameit scams, often with 'adult' angles.

By the time their chargeback percentage reached a certain threshold and the processor has to cut them off (to preserve THEIR ability to process cards from the Big Three) tens or hundreds of thousands may have been rung through, the processers have gotten their percentage, everybodys happy...except the card companies.

SpeedingLunatic said:   dcwilbur said:   glxpass said:   Glitch99 said:   glxpass said:   dcwilbur said:   KYBOSH said:   I dont think this is a mistake (like mis-typing the CC number).
Unless they also mistyped the corresponding billing zipcode and got it right.
Your zip code is not needed to process a credit card charge.
That's true for in-person purchases. In fact, it's against the law in California for a merchant to request the purchaser's zip code. See http://www.sfgate.com/business/article/Stores-can-t-ask-for-ZIP-...For online purchases though, I think billing zip code is used for verification.
Depends on the merchant, and the level of verification they pay for. Alot of times, just the card number and expiration date is all that is needed, sometimes the CID number on the back, and sometimes address.
IME, every online purchase I've made has required at the minimum credit card number, expiration date, and some personal information, such as zip code, phone number, or full billing address. A taxi driver asked for phone number. Interestingly, that was apparently enough for Square to send a receipt to my e-mail address, which I didn't provide.

ETA, it's possible that Square already had my e-mail address linked to the payment card from prior transactions with that card and Square.
I was just billed by a merchant that I have never done business with before, and I know for a fact that the company did not have my mailing address, telephone number, or the verification code from the card. Folks, merchants may use additional data to verify your account, but it is most certainly not a requirement.


For instance, Amazon payments can process a CC charge with only the number and exp date. They don't ask for the security code, and they don't verify address/phone#.


Whether to verify an address is a setting that every merchant can add / remove from their account.
Because I sell online and many of my customers will use a gift card I choose to forgo this verification check.
Many gift cards don't play nice with the whole zip code or billing vs shipping address business.
You can loose a potential customer right before they hit the finish line this way.


This is from my CC processor:


Processing Gift Credit Card Transactions
As with past years, the popularity of gift credit cards (stored-value cards with a Visa, MasterCard, Discover or American Express logo) continues to rise, not just through the holidays, but throughout the year. As many of your customers may try to use a gift card for their purchases, you may need to update your Address Verification Service (AVS) filter settings in order to accept these transactions.

AVS allows you to validate a customer's billing address in order to accept a credit card transaction. However, for customers using gift credit cards, the actual billing address will typically not be associated with the gift card, or will not exist on file at the issuing bank. If you are using the default payment gateway AVS settings, this means you may end up rejecting valid gift card transactions.

To allow for the smooth processing of gift credit cards during and after this holiday season, please turn off the appropriate default payment gateway setting:

1. Log into the Merchant Interface
2. Click Account from the main toolbar
3. Click Address Verification Service in the Security section
4. Uncheck the checkbox labeled U - The address information for the cardholder is unavailable (If you are using the advanced fraud detection suite , you can choose to allow, allow and report the triggered filter, or authorize and hold for review all transactions the result in a U response code)
5. Click Submit or Save
Your AVS settings will then be updated to allow the processing of gift credit card purchases that do not have available address information.

In addition to maintaining appropriate AVS settings, we highly recommend signing up for and configuring our advanced fraud detection suite which allows you to customize its filters and tools to meet the needs of your business, including the ability to accept, manually review or decline transactions based upon the criteria you establish.


But I dont think a city, county, state government office would be that lax.


While this is a very convenient for the buyer and seller of your every internet transaction, I dont think a city, county, state government office would be that lax.
If your card didn't work, you will probably have to go in and do it in person or mail a check. They aren't worried about loosing your business to a competitor.

Amazon probably disables this feature so you can drain your GCs of those last few dollars and cents. Its an incentive to use the AP service.

glxpass said:   Glitch99 said:   glxpass said:   dcwilbur said:   KYBOSH said:   I dont think this is a mistake (like mis-typing the CC number).
Unless they also mistyped the corresponding billing zipcode and got it right.
Your zip code is not needed to process a credit card charge.

That's true for in-person purchases. In fact, it's against the law in California for a merchant to request the purchaser's zip code. See http://www.sfgate.com/business/article/Stores-can-t-ask-for-ZIP-...

For online purchases though, I think billing zip code is used for verification.

Depends on the merchant, and the level of verification they pay for. Alot of times, just the card number and expiration date is all that is needed, sometimes the CID number on the back, and sometimes address.

IME, every online purchase I've made has required at the minimum credit card number, expiration date, and some personal information, such as zip code, phone number, or full billing address. A taxi driver asked for phone number. Interestingly, that was apparently enough for Square to send a receipt to my e-mail address, which I didn't provide.

ETA, it's possible that Square already had my e-mail address linked to the payment card from prior transactions with that card and Square.

As I've said before, I routinely have stuff shipped to my sister's in a different state. I typically enter her address as both the shipping and billing address, instead of my own, since merchants tend to be more sensative to a discrepency between the two rather than verifying either.

KYBOSH said:   
But I dont think a city, county, state government office would be that lax.


While this is a very convenient for the buyer and seller of your every internet transaction, I dont think a city, county, state government office would be that lax.
If your card didn't work, you will probably have to go in and do it in person or mail a check. They aren't worried about loosing your business to a competitor.

Amazon probably disables this feature so you can drain your GCs of those last few dollars and cents. Its an incentive to use the AP service.

People who legitimately pay bills at addresses that do not match their CC: Rental property owners, parents, separated couples, long term guests.
And if their payment is rejected they will call and raise hell.

billrubin said:   sackoloot said:   This happens more than you would think. Criminals aren't that bright and do things like pay utility bills with stolen CCs. For some crazy reason the authorities don't like to pursue these crimes. Maybe they figure it's too easy.I had a fraudulent charge on a card pay for the California bar ethics exam (or so it was suggested based on the amount and payee). How's that for irony?
That's how we learn in California

grex23 said:   I would contact the FBI on the Obama for America donation. There was a lot of voter fraud and irregularities and people were using a lot of different methods to funnel funds illegally as well as commit voter fraud.

10 days after this posting my own card got broken into. I posted a tip to the local police department and contacted the Credit issuer and already received a new card and a credit was issued pending investigation. Initially it was a full credit no questions asked but after I contacted the local Police since it was inside the same jurisdiction as where I lived it got changed to a temporary credit and an investigation is being done.

It was to a store I wouldn't shop at and a location I would never go to so someone made a physical copy of my own name and Card numbers and the like. The perpetrator will be caught. What fool would go into a store with cameras and falsify a signature and use a fake card within City limits which has loads of cameras, including in hidden locations.

People are really idiotic today.

grex23 said:   People do enter wrong credit card information and some poor websites don't allow for easy correcting of mistakes or noticing them.

Nothing in life is perfect. Mistakes will happen, even if the plastic and magnetic swipe strip look perfect.

Not a big deal. Just dispute. A vast number of cardholders will experience problems and have to dispute after monitoring transactions. It is the way it works.


To the person who hacked my own account after I posted this: Your image is on file in multiple locations within city limits. You will be prosecuted to the fullest extent of the law. Credit issuer was put on notice and I submitted what happened to the Police department.

Person goes into a store I wouldn't go to and physically presents a card and fakes my signature. I had my card with me so it obviously was a fake card as well and the image is on file with the stores security cameras.

I wonder if the person read what I posted here and in retaliation went after me since it seems odd it would be 10 days after this posting that a charge was actually posted to my account. Not sure but the perp will get caught.

grex23 said:   grex23 said:   People do enter wrong credit card information and some poor websites don't allow for easy correcting of mistakes or noticing them.

Nothing in life is perfect. Mistakes will happen, even if the plastic and magnetic swipe strip look perfect.

Not a big deal. Just dispute. A vast number of cardholders will experience problems and have to dispute after monitoring transactions. It is the way it works.


To the person who hacked my own account after I posted this: Your image is on file in multiple locations within city limits. You will be prosecuted to the fullest extent of the law. Credit issuer was put on notice and I submitted what happened to the Police department.


In many areas, credit card fraud is a low priority for investigation. It's kind of like a car accident without injury where the cops won't come out to the scene (but they will write up a report if you go to the police station). Unless your local PD is known to investigate credit card fraud (or your case is part of a ring/pattern that is popping up in the area), I wouldn't be so sure that the cops will do more than just write up a report.

grex23 said:   grex23 said:   People do enter wrong credit card information and some poor websites don't allow for easy correcting of mistakes or noticing them.

Nothing in life is perfect. Mistakes will happen, even if the plastic and magnetic swipe strip look perfect.

Not a big deal. Just dispute. A vast number of cardholders will experience problems and have to dispute after monitoring transactions. It is the way it works.


To the person who hacked my own account after I posted this: Your image is on file in multiple locations within city limits. You will be prosecuted to the fullest extent of the law. Credit issuer was put on notice and I submitted what happened to the Police department.

Person goes into a store I wouldn't go to and physically presents a card and fakes my signature. I had my card with me so it obviously was a fake card as well and the image is on file with the stores security cameras.

I wonder if the person read what I posted here and in retaliation went after me since it seems odd it would be 10 days after this posting that a charge was actually posted to my account. Not sure but the perp will get caught.
Yes grex, I'm sure someone on here figured out who you were and was so offended by your post that they went and stole your CC info.

civ2k1 said:   grex23 said:   grex23 said:   People do enter wrong credit card information and some poor websites don't allow for easy correcting of mistakes or noticing them.

Nothing in life is perfect. Mistakes will happen, even if the plastic and magnetic swipe strip look perfect.

Not a big deal. Just dispute. A vast number of cardholders will experience problems and have to dispute after monitoring transactions. It is the way it works.


To the person who hacked my own account after I posted this: Your image is on file in multiple locations within city limits. You will be prosecuted to the fullest extent of the law. Credit issuer was put on notice and I submitted what happened to the Police department.


In many areas, credit card fraud is a low priority for investigation. It's kind of like a car accident without injury where the cops won't come out to the scene (but they will write up a report if you go to the police station). Unless your local PD is known to investigate credit card fraud (or your case is part of a ring/pattern that is popping up in the area), I wouldn't be so sure that the cops will do more than just write up a report.


I submitted the tip with the police department and a detective did call. The Credit Card firm was also put on notice. This wasn't an ordinary case because the person actually had a cloned card and spent it at a local store but these are getting more common. My PD has been involved with numerous Credit card fraud cases.

They don't need to come out to where I am. The firm has store security and the image is on the video tape and the perpetrator is on other cameras as well. The case is still under investigation.

It was a case like so many others. Unfortunately credit card fraud is the most common theft now since more people are using cards and less people are using cash.

http://tinyurl.com/bag8htc Just an example of one of many.

Computer hacking happens. Anything is possible. Source of entry could be too many to name, but if they do an investigation and arrest the perp, then problem solved.

grex23 said:   Computer hacking happens. Anything is possible. Source of entry could be too many to name, but if they do an investigation and arrest the perp, then problem solved.
Only it's not solved. An arrest just tells the next "perp" what the last guy did wrong, so he can be better at getting away with it.

Since grex's case is being solved, SIS, do you have an update on yours?
SUCKISSTAPLES said:   I just sued a mortgage lender for incorrectly paying a tax bill that wasn't due , they have 30 days to appeal the judgment . We shall seeSUCKISSTAPLES said:   They did indeed increase escrow . And there are some other unusual facts that gave rise to demonstrable damages, but Ill share more details after its finalized

sackoloot said:   This happens more than you would think. Criminals aren't that bright and do things like pay utility bills with stolen CCs. For some crazy reason the authorities don't like to pursue these crimes. Maybe they figure it's too easy.
10 days after posting this, some criminal was offended and broke into my place. Everything was stolen, and replaced with an exact duplicate.

BingBlangBlaow said:   Since grex's case is being solved, SIS, do you have an update on yours?
SUCKISSTAPLES said:   I just sued a mortgage lender for incorrectly paying a tax bill that wasn't due , they have 30 days to appeal the judgment . We shall seeSUCKISSTAPLES said:   They did indeed increase escrow . And there are some other unusual facts that gave rise to demonstrable damages, but Ill share more details after its finalized

Yep . Paid and done.
They didn't want to appeal so the lender paid without further drama .

However ,the issue of the recent inaccurate credit reporting hasn't been resolved and wasn't part of the litigation . We will see if they choose to fix that voluntarily or whether they'd like to show up to court again



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