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I am the furthest thing from a religious guy but I still went ahead and said a prayer for you just in case it works.

I also donated a few bucks.

You seem like an amazing guy, keep fighting the fight, sir

evilspammer said:   This is exactly the kind of situation I like my dollars paying for. Please encourage your wife to use the public assistance if it is available.

Thank you - accepting assistance is well outside of our comfort zone, but we're learning to let people help right now.

lp244 said:   mlocker1 said:    There are some experimental immunotherapies for this illness that appear to have promise. You might want to consider a clinical trial to gain access to a therapy such as this. If you are interested, a search for brain cancer on clinicaltrials.gov can probably get you started.

Most, but not all, of those promising immunotherapy trials require gross total resection for entrance. I'd also encourage the OP to seek a second opinion from a top brain cancer center (eg Duke, UCLA...). Besides having the top surgeons who may be able to operate, they also participate in many trials.

As has been noted, your self-description suggests you are young. Younger patients do far better with glioblastoma.


I'll update the OP as well, but I'll list it here as well...

We're Treating With
UVA Health System / Dr. Schiff

We've Consulted (and Vetted)
Duke / Dr. Friedman
Mayo Clinic
Cedars Sinai
Johns Hopkins
MCV (VCU)

I'm 30 years-old. I don't have a glioblastoma - I've heard that's both a blessing and a curse. I have a diffuse brain stem glioma, focused in the medulla. We're not sure whether it is a low-grade or a high-grade glioma because a biopsy is really not a viable option for me.

I do not see anyone explicitly mentioning a living trust but this is definitely something you want to consider.

A few years ago my friend died and left an estate of about $3Million. I know because he asked me to help his wife out on her finances. He and his wife had a living trust and we were able to transfer everything to her name in a few months for $10k lawyer's fees. It could have been less but my friend's wife wanted to go to the lawyers that set up the trust.

My wife's mother recently passed away. She left an estate of about $600K with only a will. It has been over three years and more than $25K in lawyer's fees so far and they still have not filed the final tax returns. We are not the estate personal representatives so we cannot do anything about it.

I do now want to debate my personal situation. The point is that from my experience a living trust will make settling the estate process much cheaper and smoother.

frenchylarue said:   I'm more with Brody than ellory--keep the house. Payment seems minimal vs rent of a lesser place. Equity is minimal and broker fees would swallow that.

Was going to suggest trying to live on $3481 to determine what extra would be needed monthly. But sounds like you are living pretty tightly right now.

You have 4-5 years till all kids are in school--you will be around for at least part of that time. I see the tight budget years as being until that point, but you could draw more from the life ins. for those years with the understanding your wife could then work. Most schools have aftercare programs, which can be subsidized for the needy--she shouldn't be bashful. Your wife could be able to work full-time once all are in school.

Some school districts allow students to enroll if their parent works in the area. Look into the school districts near your wife's potential re-employer to see if they offer this. Then she could commute, drop them off, work a full day, and pick them up and head home.

Other thoughts on "passive" income:
While kid(s) are still at home, the wife may be able to run an at-home daycare.
Any time--possibly rent out one of the rooms. If rents are as high as you say, someone might pay good money for a nice house. Advertise at nearby colleges or employers that are upscale for safety factor.

Work won't hurt the kids. Start with a paper route. In 7 years, the eldest is 16, 12-13 years for the 3 and 4 year old. I started working at 14. It won't hurt them and could increase their self respect from contributing to the family.


These are fantastic points - thank you. Many of these are points that I'm a bit surprised didn't occur to me on my own. That's one of the reasons I wanted to start this thread: To get some level-headed insight that I'm somewhat incapable of right now. I've been working since 14 myself - it's served me well. I'll bring all these points up with my wife.

Dear OP, I wish you all the best. We all be there no matter what, sooner or later. You, however, are showing an example of a real Man - brave, strong, honest, and didicated to people who need him the most. I wish to be like you when my time comes. Respect, OP

BrodyInsurance said:   suezyque said:   As a woman that is not a conversation that I would want to have with someone I loved so deeply. That is just me though. The thought of my husband telling me to go out and replace him seems wrong.

I think that it's pretty important. It wouldn't be your husband telling you to replace him. Rather, it would be your husband telling you how much that he loves you and wanting you to know that most of all he wants you and the children to be happy and to continue living and having a wonderful life. When someone gets remarried following the death of a spouse, the last thing in the world that is happening is that the first spouse is getting replaced.


I think a good way to address this entire topic is that, at best, it's extremely complex. The entire subject encompasses financial concerns as well as matters of the heart (not to sound cutesy). Additionally, given the highly subjective nature of opinions on the subject, and the entire range of emotions that can come with it, it's probably impossible to reach any sort of objective consensus within this thread. My wife and I are both pragmatic, but we're also both very in tune with our hearts on this. We've talked about this kind of thing over the years anyway - we'll figure this one out. I highly doubt the right answer for one couple is the same answer for any other.

exoticimagekk23 said:   ellory said:   ETA, medical expenses are deductible over a threshold (2% I think)

You need to make a decision on how much treatment you can afford. Sounds heartless I know. But your wife will want to spend everything to extend your time, leaving her destitute. Is that what you want?

Also,
1) if she is not financially savvy, knows how to invest and how to be frugal, she needs to learn right away or get help
2) you need a will, an Advanced Medical directive, at the right time - a DNR, and a durable power of attorney. Your wife if she is level headed, someone else if she is not.

my apologies before I disagree. drs practice medicine, they are not God. I have seen patients outlive even the worst of diagnosis. and money should never come before health. once you have done every possible thing you can and you have no other options, then you resume trying to secure a future. God bless you for being a true husband and father. Please do not forget about you in the process. my best friend was diagnosed with terminal ovarian cancer with a 2 to 6 month survival at age 30. at age 35 they operated and said she wouldn't make it through the night. and at age 37 she went in for surgery and they opened her and said they couldn't do anything because the cancer was so advanced. she passed away at age 82 about 3 years ago. Maybe I'm crazy, and the odds are against you but anything is possible. stay strong. fight till there is no fight left. I am praying for you. your family needs you more than they need the money. good luck to you, and please do not give in.


Thank you very much for your reply - survival stories are always very encouraging.

dshibb said:   BrodyInsurance said:   but you're forgetting one very important piece and that is the behavior change for having an insurance carrier assume my risk.

I agree with you 100%. I used to sell lots of variable annuities. (I don't any longer.) The products made sense in many cases precisely for that reason.

In general, what has changed is that the cost to do this is now much higher and the carriers have taken away the ability to invest the money in an aggressive manner to really take advantage of it.

That leaves us with really just the ability to do it with the death benefit. I have often seen how the living benefits influence investor behavior. It is much less likely that the death benefit would have this same impact. It is much easier to not care about the possibility of investment losses when those losses don't impact the individual. An 80 year old who is financially comfortable probably isn't going to panic because he son is going to inherit $100,000 in her VA instead of $110,000.

IMO, it would just take a very atypical fact pattern for this truly to impact investor behavior when it is being done to leave money behind.

Edit: Let me add that some of the older enhanced death benefits absolutely did influence investor behavior. I've seen situations in which the death benefit was $100,000+ over the contract value and this was without the contract itself being underwater.


Bold: I agree that it has become substantially harder to find good profiles since they're started cracking down on these strategies, but I do believe that if you can reasonably predict life span within a pretty tight range there is still value in looking at this.


Again, I agree. It's just that it has to be a pretty short life span for it to make sense, otherwise the fees can really hurt the upside as much as the insurance protects the downside.

For instance, if the OP said, "I have $100,000 inside of my IRA", a VA could certainly make sense for this money. I purposely used IRA money for this example because it gets rid of the taxation disadvantage at death of a non-qualified annuity vs. mutual funds.

dshibb said:   dshibb said:   ProfessorEd said:   There is one other technique to look at.

This is a variable annuity. These typically ave a death benefit (needed to make them an insurance product). These are frequently the greater of the actual value of the investments, or the amount put into them.

You would then get one for the largest single premium you culd swing. Let say it was $200,000.It should then be invested in the riskiest manner. To make the logic clear, suppose the outcomes were one of two possibilities. You make $100 or lose 100,000 on the investments. If you lose, the death benefit is the $200,000 (your initial payment). If you win, the policy is worth $300,000 and that is what is received on your death.

The is usually the highest rate of return someone with a short life expectancy can get, making it very attractive.

I would fund it by methods such as selling the house, possibly cashing out the life insurance, using credit card debt. etc.

Such contracts involve an annuity option, and she may want to take it if there is a profit just to minimize the tax hit (If the investment yields $100,000 she may not want to take it all as cash since that will be $100,000 o income, and if spread out she will probably be in lower brackets in later years, from what you said.

I have discussed this with several advisers and they agree. to my knowledge no firms ask any health questions (the closest is that they have a maximum age for contracts, which is often at least 80 or ninety).
The fees on these are often high, but with your life expectancy, this would be a very good deal. I don't' know who to use. The fellow who calls himself Brody Insurance seems smart a may have an insurance business business, and I could mention at least one agent who I have a decent amount with (in the millions) who has discussed the very short life expectancy case with me.

If you want to discuss this idea in more detail, PM me and we can exchange phone numbers.



^^^Actually this is smart. I'll throw my weight behind this, but it doesn't seem like he has enough to make this worthwhile himself, but based upon the amazing success another person had(that was reported by I believe public radio and then posted on here) it might even make sense to 'investor'(read family) money behind this. It makes a lot of logical sense to take advantage of this one.

Can someone track down that thread on this and re-post it?


Found it: All Time Greatest Heavy Hitter?

OP you should read this!! This is something you should definitely look at.


Thank you - reading now!

Kashisti said:   webdeveloper said:   OP what is the name of your medical condition and how old are you?

Seems that you are pretty young, therefore might be considered a prime subject for some of the clinical trials.
Please take a look at possible clinical trials PRIOR to starting chemo, since a lot of them might not be applied for if you are in the middle of your treatment.

My dad is currently battling Glioblastoma so I know way too much about it than I would ever want to. If it's the same condition let me know and I will write up a treatment timeline of my dad.


I apologize for the delay in my reply - I've been pulling Mr. Mom duty since I got off of work yesterday.

The condition is "a diffuse brain steam glioma, focal point in the medulla." I'm 30 years-old. I'm sorry to hear about your father - I've heard that the Glioblastomas are a very tough road themselves. We've been told that the diffuse brain stem gliomas are rare in adults - they only account for about 1% of brain tumors in adults. As far as we know (and our neuro-oncologist knows) there are no clinical trials available. I didn't realize that about the pre/post chemo, though - I'll get my Google on again tonight to make sure we've exhausted all means.



One more thing to keep in mind. Different chemo drugs might be more toxic than the others.
If you fill a slightest discomfort in the stomach area I suggest visiting ER right away. My dad had a round of Temodar and it was just fine, however when second time around he got prescribed Avastin, after a second treatment it caused perforated colon and he had to go thru two colostomies.

Will pray for you.

jaytrader said:   chocula said:   OP, I am very sorry for your health situation. I will pray for you and your family.

Your therapy goes through April 19, which is my birthday. It may seem like a regular day, but search Google and you can see that some crazy stuff has happened on April 19 and right around. Not just my birthday, but I fell it is a special time of the year and I pray it works well for you.

I did not see it mentioned, but I am curious... How old are you?

I am practically in tears for you and your family and will donate. What does it mean when it says the donations will be given at a later date? Give it as we donate.
I wish I had some advice or suggestions for you, but prayers are what I will give for you.

Good luck to you and your family OP.


It means that I don't want to flood the OP with donations in varying amounts. I figured I'd let it go for a week, see if it got traction, and then give to the OP in certain amounts. While I do believe the OP, I am still waiting on a name, facebook page, etc. Nothing personal to OP, but I can't just give people's money away to someone without at least seeing a profile, talking to them, etc. OP is reasonable, and I'm sure he'll understand that. In the meanwhile, it sits in a PayPal account and is not going anywhere yet.

Also, OP doesn't *NEED* the money now, so he implies from his posts. This is simply a preemptive measure that I figured would be a good idea for future use. If you disagree with my idea, then you don't have to donate to me. You can donate directly to the OP, I'm sure he'll give his information for you to send a donation to. Why do you care how it's done? All that matters is 100% of the donations (less paypal fees) are going to the OP at some point or another. I am not touching a single cent of the money. I donated $75 ($100 less domain name and privatization of my information on the WHOIS record) initially to get the ball rolling (and I even paid the paypal fee), and will donate a bit more later on depending on the performance of this whole deal.

Not trying to sound combative, but you have to see it from my position. I'm trying to do a good thing here and I'm getting a complaint..."no good deed goes unpunished" rings a bell.


Just making my way to this post - Jaytrader PMd me for my Facebook page yesterday. I just got back to him today. He's right - we don't "need" the money now. We're also fairly uncomfortable accepting charity in the first place, though as many have mentioned, we need to get over that and let people help us right now.

We thoroughly appreciate the donations. I'm stunned every time I read a post reflecting that someone has donated to us - and that would be the case whether they donated $0.01 or $1000.00. Same goes just for the words of encouragement. Not sure where I'm going with this...I guess I just want everyone to know how much we appreciate everything.

hicyrus said:   Is there any way to give fatwallet cash directly?

How about some FW Cash Back?

Sorry to hear about your situation,stay positive stay strong.
you are in our prayers.
sorry was busy with other things, donations made.
god bless you and your family.

Just talked to Kashisti via Facebook chat. Had to cut the chat short because he had to go cook dinner...for his family. What a guy, he is. (sorry, Kashisti, not trying to divulge our personal conversations, but I felt the need to inspire people with that)

Keep the donations rolling in, please!

cremation said:   realistically, you will die young.

but most everybody fears death & will therefore feed you a steady diet of romance.

ignore them.

then ditch all of your responsibilities & live like a smart teenager until you get called in for an early dirt nap.


Thanks for the advice - but years of parenting (regardless of my own kids' ages) has taught me that I should be wary of anyone using the phrase "smart teenager."

Rayout said:   OP give a ketogenic diet a shot. Not sure if your tumor will respond but certain cancer cells are very glucose dependent and a super low carb diet can help turn the tide. Best luck to you.

This is another route that your MD will almost certainly not suggest, but hot damn if it were me I would be pulling out all the stops and eating literally only meat/veggies/fat for the next few weeks. There's some promising (albeit not-as-yet mainsteam) literature that very-low carbohydrate diets can in slow down the growth of certain types of cancer, like Ray mentioned above. Robb Wolf covered this a few times on his website -

I lost my father when I was very young. Although I learned a lot about him from others, there is so much more I wish I knew about him. A few short notes or a letter would have meant a lot to me.

Although you should spend as much time with your family as possible, take a few minutes each day to write down what matters to you and why. Tell stories and jokes to your family. If there is some special advice on any topic, whether it's how to deal with difficult people or strategies for linear algebra; pass it along. Think of what you would like to say at each of your children's weddings and put it into a handwritten note. I know it is unlikely, but I hope that you will have the opportunity to pass your thoughts along to your grandchildren in person.

OP, you're obviously an intelligent, mature and thoughtful individual. In spite on what you and your family are going through, you were able to create one of the most thorough informative posts I have ever read on FW.

deleted!

I'm impressed with the FWF, donations of almost $1k in like a day.

Skimming most of the advice here, there isn't much more I can add. But I can suggest one thing, and that is to simply stay alive. I had multiple pulmonary embolisms and had 3 surgeries, each time when I was at the brink of death (twice) something clicked in my head and my body did what it needed to do to stay alive, even though I couldn't breathe. Amazing how you can survive without enough air and messed up lungs. I'm 29 now and I cant imagine not being able to choose to survive in another situation like that, since I had the choice twice already.

Anyways, I suggest that you start EATING very very healthy, AND the BEST PIECE OF ADVICE I can give you is Cayenne Pepper. Seriously, this stuff is magic. Stores like CVS/Duane Reade etc have capsules that you can take. I think I average about 1 pill a day, but I usually dont take them if I feel perfect. If I feel an achy bone or slight headache, or any discomfort I take a capsule or 2 and a short while later I'm back to 100%. But I believe cayenne pepper has much more to offer than that, and it may be one way to living a longer, better life.

Of course cayenne pepper is not the only thing you should be taking, there are a lot more things, but I think its one of the most important. I'd love to learn about more, and I will as I get more time and devote the time to finding them.

It's not worth much these days and its not clearly better than other more aggressive end-of-life investing strategies, but when you die holding a CD with a "survivors option" your heir can redeem it without penalty. Essentially this means for the money your family doesn't need til after you die, you can invest in a 5-10 year CD and get a better interest rate without having to hold it that long.

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052702303990604577366312...

TheDragonn said:   Rayout said:   OP give a ketogenic diet a shot. Not sure if your tumor will respond but certain cancer cells are very glucose dependent and a super low carb diet can help turn the tide. Best luck to you.

This is another route that your MD will almost certainly not suggest, but hot damn if it were me I would be pulling out all the stops and eating literally only meat/veggies/fat for the next few weeks. There's some promising (albeit not-as-yet mainsteam) literature that very-low carbohydrate diets can in slow down the growth of certain types of cancer, like Ray mentioned above. Robb Wolf covered this a few times on his website -


For those interested in this diet, here's anecdotal reference: http://www.cbn.com/cbnnews/healthscience/2012/december/starving-...

If I was going to die in a year, I would be eating nothing but steak and bacon every day anyways.

I am very sorry to hear about this but you do have a fighting chance to actually bounce back. There are traditional medical treatments that can help you but with the obvious side effects. I am not sure if you have heard of Dr. Burzynski, but he has cured many people through natural treatments with brain tumors and has had a lot of success.

I know you have a incredible chance of living out a full normal life with your family. Check it out. You will be in my prayers..

The best FWF advice I can give you is to your health.

http://www.burzynskiclinic.com/

I am OP's brother. He showed me the thread earlier today and I read the whole thing tonight - lots of good ideas!

I just wanted to thank everyone for giving their advice, recommendations, prayers, etc.

Thanks also to jaytrader for setting up the donations site and to anyone who donated. Although the post certainly wasn't intended to solicit donations, the fact that the FW community stepped up to set up a fund and contribute so much to a total stranger is really moving! Thank you!

uzbek8 said:   I am OP's brother. He showed me the thread earlier today and I read the whole thing tonight - lots of good ideas!

I just wanted to thank everyone for giving their advice, recommendations, prayers, etc.

Thanks also to jaytrader for setting up the donations site and to anyone who donated. Although the post certainly wasn't intended to solicit donations, the fact that the FW community stepped up to set up a fund and contribute so much to a total stranger is really moving! Thank you!


My pleasure for setting it up. I think I speak for the entire community when I say that we're glad to help.

Rooting for you OP! Wishing the very best for you and your family!

Donation made!

http://donatekashisti.org

Method72 said:   I am very sorry to hear about this but you do have a fighting chance to actually bounce back. There are traditional medical treatments that can help you but with the obvious side effects. I am not sure if you have heard of Dr. Burzynski, but he has cured many people through natural treatments with brain tumors and has had a lot of success.

I know you have a incredible chance of living out a full normal life with your family. Check it out. You will be in my prayers..

The best FWF advice I can give you is to your health.

http://www.burzynskiclinic.com/

While OP shouldn't abandon hope and while it's possible some non-traditional therapies might help, it should go without saying that promises of near-miraculous recoveries that can't be duplicated and which involve significant expense should be looked at with some skepticism. Another take on Burzynski:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Burzynski_Clinic

Once you identify the medications you're on and likley to be on, research them at the Partnership for Prescription Assistance at https://www.pparx.org which is a joint creation by most of the pharmaceutical industry. You may qualify for free or discounted drugs (or copay assistance) from the manufacturers. Even if you don't qualify now, your family might qualify for their own medications if you pass away.

I agree he should stick with traditional and also alternative treatment. The only caution I have of traditional is find the absolute best, I personally know of some stories not worth mentioning b/c the OP needs to focus on beating this. I have friends that used alternative treatment advice that helped them tremendously, which is why I am for alternative treatments. I can't personally vouch for the Dr's success, there is always two sides to everything. All I personally care about is the OP beating this, now that is the FW way, to come out on top. My prayers are with him and his family, to be 100% back to normal.

Sorry I haven't read the whole thread, and do not want to double post, but please have a friend set up a Meal Train ( http://www.mealtrain.com/ ) during this difficult time.

LtWaldo said:   FatWalletLurker said:   http://www.fatwallet.com/forums/finance/740005/

My post from 2007 has some good info, and also some rays of light. Here we are 6 years later, and she's healthier than ever. Let's hope your FW story has a similarly happy middle (we're not done yet!).


Did you ever go through with this? Did they fight you on the $10k balance, or cancel it?


She went in for an experimental drug and never had the long hospital stay. The drug didn't work, so they swapped to another one, and everything has been great since then. I got a new job selling life insurance (in 2008, felt I had a pretty compelling personal story) and our household income quadrupled. All is well thus far!

A quick note from experience in the insurance world, the TV advertised policies are probably not all that useful. You'll basically only get your premium (+small %) back for the first two years or so.

On the other hand, your employer-based insurance can be maintained even if you leave the company (at least in MO it is guaranteed convertible).
One note you should know is that those employer policies are often applicable almost immediately upon employment (some only during enrollment). If you change to an employer who offers 200k in insurance, and keep your old coverage, you've got a lot better total coverage. Not great for your old employer (who is treating you well), but your first priority sounds like it's your family, not your boss. If you switch jobs enough times, you could build up a sizeable number of dollars in life insurance.

Good luck, bro.

FatWalletLurker said:    If you switch jobs enough times, you could build up a sizeable number of dollars in life insurance.

Good luck, bro.

Interesting concept. However, if OP can't even get to his current job now, how's he going to go job-hopping? Regardless, still an interesting concept you've uncovered.

OP, I just wanted to commend you on your incredible maturity. I've known folks to have stage 3B, untreatable cancer and live in utter denial until the medical supply company wheels in the hospital bed, the oxygen, and the IV drip.

This situation is not easy thing to face and your pragmatism and desire to take care of your family are very helpful.

As a cancer survivor I have decided to leave a professionally prepared DNA sample for my descendants. As medical technology advances I'm hoping there may be warning signs that might indicate early detection, or at least the likelihood of certain cancers beside the one I am already dealing with. I feel it is just as important as making video memories for those we leave behind. It sounds like you are doing a wonderful job of saving your family, and I truly hope it turns out your efforts were all precautionary.

I like how you're thinking, FatWalletLurker. It would take a pretty unusual fact pattern, but doing this could make a huge difference for someone in the right situation. Here are just a few comments for others on what you posted.

A quick note from experience in the insurance world, the TV advertised policies are probably not all that useful. You'll basically only get your premium (+small %) back for the first two years or so.

I would quibble with your characterization of "not all that useful". This is simply because if death occurs within 2 years there isn't a loss and if death occurs after 2 year, it can work out to be a tremendous return. If my memory serves me correctly, the last time that I did one of these was a few years ago. The premium was about $3,000 for $50,000 of coverage. That's a heck of a return if the person does live for two years and it only turns out to be a bad thing if the person lives longer than 10 years.

This would not be an "Alex Trebeck" TV advertised product. Those are only guaranteed issue at older ages. Up until a couple of years ago, products with death benefits as high as $50,000 existed for individuals like the OP. I don't know if any still do.

On the other hand, your employer-based insurance can be maintained even if you leave the company (at least in MO it is guaranteed convertible).

These types of things can vary state to state. My guess is that it is only the employee paid portion that is convertible. In other states, it may or may not be convertible with no evidence of insurability. Even if it is convertible, often, it is not convertible as term insurance. It must be converted to a Whole Life policy. These are sometimes very expensive whole life policies.

One note you should know is that those employer policies are often applicable almost immediately upon employment (some only during enrollment). If you change to an employer who offers 200k in insurance, and keep your old coverage, you've got a lot better total coverage. Not great for your old employer (who is treating you well), but your first priority sounds like it's your family, not your boss. If you switch jobs enough times, you could build up a sizeable number of dollars in life insurance.

The challenge here is that even if someone wants to do this, supplemental coverage often involves underwriting. It may be simplified and just ask a few questions, but any questions would cause someone like the OP to be declined. Also, make sure that with the job switching to keep in mind the need to keep the disability coverage.

If I had a situation similar to the OP, and I was still capable of getting a new job, I would seriously consider the strategy laid out by FatWalletLurker. The key is that the new coverage would have to be guaranteed issue and the old coverage has to be convertible without evidence of insurability.

I've included this link simply because it is an example of how this could work. http://www.indiana.edu/~uhrs/benefits/supplemental.html

If I could, I would get hired at IU and quit my old job. I would convert my old coverage. As long as my new job paid $50,000 or more, I could on my first day of being hired purchase $200,000 of coverage. On day 2, I would quit and convert the coverage to individual coverage. This would both give me the money that I need for my family to be more comfortable and allow me to spend my remaining days/months/years with my family.

jaytrader said:   FatWalletLurker said:    If you switch jobs enough times, you could build up a sizeable number of dollars in life insurance.

Good luck, bro.

Interesting concept. However, if OP can't even get to his current job now, how's he going to go job-hopping? Regardless, still an interesting concept you've uncovered.


If he has a friend who owns a business, he could beg for a job. He could then quit right after taking care of the insurance.

Your wife needs to be with you. Forget the stupid ass jobs for right now. Whats important is that she and your children deal with this and make strides to understand (how the hell do you do that). People are good they will be their for her in the dark moments, along with offering her a job. You have gotten a raw deal along with your family. I think that your wife NEEDS to be with all of you and not at a job. Your children need her now and later. Things fall into place. Your doing the right think by finding out different angles but please leave her out as far as working for now.
Working is going to be easy how the hell do you move on. Help her heart and I have no clue how, you do because you won it when you married her. You sound like a very smart man keep in mind that you would want to be with your wife if it was reversed. May God hold all of your hands and help you thru whatever you need.

My heart goes out to you and yours. I cannot offer any advice, but can offer prayers and thoughts. Please keep us updated on your condition if it is not being too intrusive.

Kashisti

I can't believe the collective group of us FWF types haven't said this yet, as in my opinion it's one of the most potentially valuable pieces of advice we can offer:

If your wife, brother, or anyone else involved does not yet have an account at FatWallet, have them sign up now and show them how to find, favorite, and/or subscribe to this thread.

That gives all of you access to an ongoing source of information and assistance no matter where things lead from here. There will be more questions, debates, and choices to be made by you and your family -- and there's no reason we can't collectively assist all of you if you all know where to speak up.

check out this article
http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052970203918304577243321...

edit: first thing i thought of when i read the first post, then I realized this has already been mentioned.



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