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We just broke $1000 in donations. Let's 10x that. Thanks everyone.

Op, you are my hero!! What a great guy. I will be lifting your name up in prayer.

dshibb said:   ProfessorEd said:   This threat has implications beyond the unfortunate person who raised the question.

Many may have powers of attorney for elderly parents, whose life expectancy is short. The variable annuity idea I pointed out is one. It works best not when death is very close but when there is still time enough for markets to fluctuate. One can often predict such a medium term probability of death just from age (most in their late eighties or nineties) will not live long. Standard annuity contracts cover themselves by a maximum age (such as 93), but there are many who are elderly, but below that age. Very often one will had additional information on the life expectancy from what one knows of a relative (co they have cancer, etc.).

In discussing this with agents who I have bought annuities from and my own experience, the old often have trouble understanding such investments and it is hard to convince them to use them. Those with powers of attorney are hesitant to do anything they do not fully understand. For instance, in the case of my late father, he was a candidate for such a strategy (and I do understand such things), the relative who had the power of attorney did ;not want to take advantage of this, and her actions to keeping his bills paid, and continuing with his previous conservative investment strategies in CDs and bonds.

Some contracts have complex options built into them that may be valuable. At least one lets me put up to another million into it without their approval.

In a Variable Annuity contract my wife has within an IRA, most of the money is being moved to Merrill Edge for their bonus (and lower fees and other advantages), but it a few hundred is being left. The contract was issued when interest rates were much higher, has a interest rate that varies, but it cannot go below 3%. Under certain circumstances this could be valuable, since safe 3% investments are rare today. While her life expectancy is high, there could be circumstances where having something that pays off the money put in on her death (for her children obviously) and otherwise what ever had been earned, could be valuable.


If the length of time between now and the estimated time of death is too long than the worse tax treatment becomes a bigger factor and it is no longer smart to do something like this. The ideal time frame to have your estimated time of life is probably around 1 year to 6 years. Anything beyond 6 years and estimated market performance becomes increasingly predictable(i.e. it's extremely likely it will be higher than it is today and all you have succeeded in doing is turning an asset that is differed and subject to capital gains taxes to one that is deferred and subject to ordinary income--which isn't good). But if they are predicting 1 year to ~6 years than there is a strong chance the market could be down and you pass away with no loss or that they are way higher than than what a stock/bond mix would have produced for you if you invested without this death benefit safety net.


This is correct. There is a narrow time window for life expectancy where this would be optimal. It does appear the original poster falls in it. there are probably many very old investors whose life expectancy is short enough so this is worth looking at.

dshibb said:   BrodyInsurance said:   ProfessorEd, I like how you are thinking, but I'll show you an example of why, usually, this isn't a good idea.

"Jim" doesn't follow this strategy. He invests $100,000 for the purpose of leaving money to his son. It grows at 8%. When he dies in 8 years, his son gets $185,000.

"John" does follow the strategy. Because of the added annuity expenses, he only gets a 6% return. When he dies in 8 years, his son get $159,385.

When we factor in taxes, Jim's son will get a step up in basis so will end up with $185,000. John's son will end up paying income tax on the gain. If he is paying a combined 30% state and federal, he will end up with $141,569.

You can play around with the numbers, but it can be a pretty sizable difference. The annuity only comes out ahead if the investments lose money, so in most cases, this will hurt and not help.


Agree with everything you shared, but you're forgetting one very important piece and that is the behavior change for having an insurance carrier assume my risk. Essentially I'm going to invest as recklessly and concentrated as I can. Where as had I invested outside of this without anybody assuming my downside risk I would invest more conservatively.

What you end up by doing this is a very, very fat bell curve. The middle 1/3 of probability might represent a spread of +5% return to +10% return. The next 1/3 might represent -10% to +20%. The next 1/3 minus the last few last percent of the tails might represent -30% to +40% in annual return. Now you then lop off all of the negative percentages because the death benefit guarantees the floor and you have a pretty attractive risk profile to throw caution into the wind.

Now on the flip side some well diversified portfolio of bonds and stocks would have a much thinner bell curve. The first 1/3 of probability might represent +4% to +6%. The next 1/3 might represent +2% to +8%. The next 1/3(minus a few percent in the extreme tails) might represent -10% to +20%.

Now under a short enough span of time the risk vs. return profile of engaging in the Variable annuity strategy might offer a substantially better estimated yield than than diversified mix of stocks and bonds when they both probably hold the same risk(because the VA is providing the death benefit). This better risk vs. return profile with the Variable annuity could potentially more than make up the difference in tax treatment.

So I don't think you can use the same interest assumption for both given what I just highlighted.


The change in investment strategy to a very risky one is a key part of the idea. Some contracts now have clauses that reduce the death benefit or other features if you invest in the riskiest (highest standard deviation of return as an empirical measure) and it works only over a time period where there is a high chance of losing appreciable amounts of money (i.e long enough for the relevant market to fluctuate, but short enough so the upward movement in stock prices does not overwhelm the risk of loss). Brody correctly draws attention to the tax implications (and the high fees in most such products).

Kashisti said:   
The condition is "a diffuse brain steam glioma, focal point in the medulla." I'm 30 years-old. I'm sorry to hear about your father - I've heard that the Glioblastomas are a very tough road themselves. We've been told that the diffuse brain stem gliomas are rare in adults - they only account for about 1% of brain tumors in adults. As far as we know (and our neuro-oncologist knows) there are no clinical trials available. I didn't realize that about the pre/post chemo, though - I'll get my Google on again tonight to make sure we've exhausted all means.



You can search for clinical trials yourself here:

http://www.clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/results?term=glioma&Search=Sea...

If it even remotely sounds that is applicable to you I suggest that you apply. After you apply you usually get a call from a local doctor doing the study and then you can more information if the study would be applicable to your situation or not. It does not cost anything to apply and there are several steps before you finally have to commit yourself to a given study. This is also a good way to get to know doctors who specialize in this disease even if you are not going to participate in a study.

As others have mentioned any previous treatment may preclude you from participation in a study, so you should keep that in mind. Another thing is if participating in a clinical trial would affect your insurance for treatments outside of a study. Specifically if your medical insurance can deny your claims in the future if they decide that is caused by pre-exisiting condition due to participation in a clinical trial.

Another concern would be what is going to happen to your medical coverage if you are going to be forced to terminate your employment.

Whats your house layout like ? Consider if you need to make adjustments in case you become physically disabled and need to use wheelchair/assistance getting into a car.

Rayout said:   TheDragonn said:   Rayout said:   OP give a ketogenic diet a shot. Not sure if your tumor will respond but certain cancer cells are very glucose dependent and a super low carb diet can help turn the tide. Best luck to you.

This is another route that your MD will almost certainly not suggest, but hot damn if it were me I would be pulling out all the stops and eating literally only meat/veggies/fat for the next few weeks. There's some promising (albeit not-as-yet mainsteam) literature that very-low carbohydrate diets can in slow down the growth of certain types of cancer, like Ray mentioned above. Robb Wolf covered this a few times on his website -


For those interested in this diet, here's anecdotal reference: http://www.cbn.com/cbnnews/healthscience/2012/december/starving-...

If I was going to die in a year, I would be eating nothing but steak and bacon every day anyways.


I personally would investigate the ketogenic diet very seriously.

However, the article above is scientifically weak. A basic biochemistry text will show that most cells normally use either glucose or fatty acids. However, the brain uses only glucose and ketones (I believe fatty acids do not get in easily). That cancer cells use only glucose has been known for a while. Warburg got the Nobel prize in 1924 for the discovery that cancer cells used glucose anaerobically.

This leads to the plausible theory that if the brain cancer cells require glucose, depriving them of glucose will stop their growth. The rest of the body may run on fats, and ketone bodies for the normal brain cells.

The human research I know of has been limited, but aimed at children with brain cancers, and has been encouraging.

Truly, I am sorry for your situation. Having recently traveled a similar journey with my brother and his wife/children, I have just one suggestion to add:

You'll want to fully understand your company's leave policy and portability of health insurance in case you eventually need to resign your position. A compassionate boss will be very helpful, but there are likely company rules about employer coverage for part-time employees (company policy may require full-time employees only on health insurance) and even coverage timeframes to consider (i.e. if you work at any time in March, you will be covered thru the end of March). Also verify status under Family Medical Leave Act in case you need to take unpaid leave and want to retain your insurance, as well as COBRA which would enable you to pay for your own insurance after you leave the job. This information may help you in being strategic about using your time-off and maximizing your time as an employee, so you can maintain your health insurance and fight the cancer with every tool in the toolbox.

A reflection from our recent experience.... when you come to terms with your money situation, shift your total focus to your family. There's no replacing the hours you can spend NOW with your family, and there's no guarantee that the coming fight will leave you with all of the abilities/function that you have now. The world becomes a different place when you receive a diagnosis like this, and making the most of this time with your family will leave a legacy that provides farther into the future than any amount of money.

jaytrader said:   We just broke $1000 in donations. Let's 10x that. Thanks everyone.


I just did a $20.00 donation. I know it's not much but it will add up to others. You have a brave heart, dude! I hope, after a year, you will come back and tell us that you beat the crap of that $hit.....

I don't have a Disability Insurance but I do have a $750K in term life insurance. I did my physical check up and came to know that I was in very good health. Right after that I bought a term life insurance and I got in top tier. I don't pay much per year but I sleep in the night thinking that if something happens to me my family will be taken care for a while.

Please people when you are in good health, buy life insurance....

glxpass said:   
http://www.burzynskiclinic.com/
While OP shouldn't abandon hope and while it's possible some non-traditional therapies might help, it should go without saying that promises of near-miraculous recoveries that can't be duplicated and which involve significant expense should be looked at with some skepticism. Another take on Burzynski:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Burzynski_Clinic


Sadly, I have to agree with this. There are many, many people holding out promises of hope to those who want it most desperately, but many of them are offering unproven or even disproven therapies.

If I were in this situation I would choose an oncologist who is monitoring alternative treatment plans and open to discussing those that actually have promise. One close friend had such a doctor, and he recommended trying the very low carb diet - but also was straight-up with her when it became clear it wasn't helping slow the progress of her disease. He also steered her toward a very cutting-edge treatment that almost certainly would have prolonged her life, but unfortunately, a severely depressed immune system got her before the cancer did.

It sounds like staying in the house for the near term makes the most sense. You felt morally obligated to not "squat" at your old house, is that something you would still feel the same about? You probably have such low equity in the house now if you did sell you might need to bring money to closing. Does anyone have experience with lenders trying to recoup from an estate? I would think only having your name on the note could give your wife some flexibility if she wanted to move.

how about one of those insurance which pay for your mortgage if you are gone, do they require medical tests/come with catch? OP check with your lender

http://www.moneycrashers.com/what-is-mortgage-protection-insuran...

Article said: Very high acceptance rates. There are very few reasons why an insurance provider would turn you down for mortgage protection insurance. While many people are counting on their life or disability insurance to cover these costs, some people have trouble getting life insurance because of their age or pre-existing medical conditions. If you’re in this scenario, then mortgage protection insurance can be your best option to protect your family’s standard of living.

Alright, we're about to break $1500 in donations. Cmon Peeps! Keep those $10 and $20 rebate cards coming! Thanks!

Edit to add: I'd like to add that FWF staff contacted me asking for my personal information and what the arrangements were regarding the donations. I'd like to clarify a couple of things here...

1) The arrangements are exactly as I've stated in this thread; they'll go to the OP at some point in time, but I don't want to flood him with checks.

2) Regarding my personal information: I understand why FWF asked me for this...but I am not going to give it to them, as I see no need. I am NOT trying to be a rebel nor am I trying to be combative. I simply don't see the need. WITH THAT SAID, please do NOT donate to me if you don't feel comfortable. I am not here to steal your money. I am simply trying to be a good guy and provide a service to a family who will need some extra cash in the future due to a horrible illness. There's nothing hidden here, all of the money is going to the OP. I have talked to the OP, and his wife, and they both seem like great, loving people. I told FWF staff to take the link down, if it was a violation of policy, so if that happens--that's your answer.

Thanks again,
jaytrader

mrkk said:   how about one of those insurance which pay for your mortgage if you are gone, do they require medical tests/come with catch? OP check with your lender

http://www.moneycrashers.com/what-is-mortgage-protection-insuran...

Article said: Very high acceptance rates. There are very few reasons why an insurance provider would turn you down for mortgage protection insurance. While many people are counting on their life or disability insurance to cover these costs, some people have trouble getting life insurance because of their age or pre-existing medical conditions. If you’re in this scenario, then mortgage protection insurance can be your best option to protect your family’s standard of living.


They typically don't require a test, but they do require medical questions.

The policies are easier to get because they assume that you are unhealthy. Thus, they are priced higher. However, assuming that you are unhealthy doesn't mean that they'll accept terrible risks.

jaytrader said:   Alright, we're about to break $1500 in donations. Cmon Peeps! Keep those $10 and $20 rebate cards coming! Thanks!

Edit to add: I'd like to add that FWF staff contacted me asking for my personal information and what the arrangements were regarding the donations. I'd like to clarify a couple of things here...

1) The arrangements are exactly as I've stated in this thread; they'll go to the OP at some point in time, but I don't want to flood him with checks.

2) Regarding my personal information: I understand why FWF asked me for this...but I am not going to give it to them, as I see no need. I am NOT trying to be a rebel nor am I trying to be combative. I simply don't see the need. WITH THAT SAID, please do NOT donate to me if you don't feel comfortable. I am not here to steal your money. I am simply trying to be a good guy and provide a service to a family who will need some extra cash in the future due to a horrible illness. There's nothing hidden here, all of the money is going to the OP. I have talked to the OP, and his wife, and they both seem like great, loving people. I told FWF staff to take the link down, if it was a violation of policy, so if that happens--that's your answer.

Thanks again,
jaytrader


I do not really understand that arrangement. Why do not you simply hand over the donation site and paypal account to the OP or at least send whatever have been donated so far to his paypal account, no need for checks flood.

tigi said:   jaytrader said:   Alright, we're about to break $1500 in donations. Cmon Peeps! Keep those $10 and $20 rebate cards coming! Thanks!

Edit to add: I'd like to add that FWF staff contacted me asking for my personal information and what the arrangements were regarding the donations. I'd like to clarify a couple of things here...

1) The arrangements are exactly as I've stated in this thread; they'll go to the OP at some point in time, but I don't want to flood him with checks.

2) Regarding my personal information: I understand why FWF asked me for this...but I am not going to give it to them, as I see no need. I am NOT trying to be a rebel nor am I trying to be combative. I simply don't see the need. WITH THAT SAID, please do NOT donate to me if you don't feel comfortable. I am not here to steal your money. I am simply trying to be a good guy and provide a service to a family who will need some extra cash in the future due to a horrible illness. There's nothing hidden here, all of the money is going to the OP. I have talked to the OP, and his wife, and they both seem like great, loving people. I told FWF staff to take the link down, if it was a violation of policy, so if that happens--that's your answer.

Thanks again,
jaytrader


I do not really understand that arrangement. Why do not you simply hand over the donation site and paypal account to the OP or at least send whatever have been donated so far to his paypal account, no need for checks flood.


I guess you're going to make me say it again? I wanted to make sure the OP wasn't a scam artist before I go giving people's money away. Frankly, I believe the OP and his wife are nice people, but it hasn't even been a week.

Oh, and, the PayPal account is tied to my name, address, bank account, etc.... It's not as easy as you make it seem.

Also, as I've said before, if you disagree with my logic, then don't donate through me. Simple, easy, no fuss.

jaytrader said:   
I guess you're going to make me say it again? I wanted to make sure the OP wasn't a scam artist before I go giving people's money away. Frankly, I believe the OP and his wife are nice people, but it hasn't even been a week.

Oh, and, the PayPal account is tied to my name, address, bank account, etc.... It's not as easy as you make it seem.



I still do not get it, how is it any different from you being a scam artist ? As to paypal, you can send whatever have been donated so far to the OP and ask him to set up his own paypal donation account and make changes on the donation website/page.

jaytrader said:   I feel that a FWF collection is in order, here.

Needless to say, when something like this happens, it really hits home for me. I have seen my mother go through many tough times with her friends and family that have been affected by cancer.

Let's do this for OP's family and children.


Hey JayTrader, good idea, thanks for setting this up.

tigi said:   jaytrader said:   
I guess you're going to make me say it again? I wanted to make sure the OP wasn't a scam artist before I go giving people's money away. Frankly, I believe the OP and his wife are nice people, but it hasn't even been a week.

Oh, and, the PayPal account is tied to my name, address, bank account, etc.... It's not as easy as you make it seem.



I still do not get it, how is it any different from you being a scam artist ? As to paypal, you can send whatever have been donated so far to the OP and ask him to set up his own paypal donation account and make changes on the donation website/page.


Again, don't donate through me....at this point, I'm begging you not to. I run the website, on my personal hosting account.

Hey JayTrader, thank you for looking out for the OP and for putting in the time, effort, and expense of setting up the donation website for Kashisti. It's good to know that people will do what they can when someone else is in need.

When I made one of the early donations, yes, I thought there was a possibility that this could all be an elaborate scam. Then, I thought about the FWF community that I've come to know and respect over many years. I know what this community would do if there was even the slightest hint of anything fishy (Agape World, anyone? Tony Patel and myuta?) and I made the decision that donating was the right thing to do. Not because the OP asked for it, not because you set up the donation website, but simply because I chose to do so.

As for anyone fearful that that are hidden agendas or evil taking place, don't donate. It's that simple.

Either way, let's get back to focusing on what else Kashisti can do to prepare for the challenges ahead for him and his family.


jaytrader said:   I feel that a FWF collection is in order, here.

Please send donations to donateKashisti@gmail.com. I have setup a PayPal donations account. Please contribute anything extra that you can. The funds will go to OP's family on a future date. I have spoken to the OP and as prideful as he is, he reluctantly agreed to let me do this favor for him.

Background: my mother survived non-Hodgkin Lymphoma when she was a teenager and was told she could never have children. Today marks her 45th birthday and she has four healthy children and has had a great life thus far. Thankfully, she has remained in remission. However, as a child, I was always helping out with Camp Good Days events and fundraisers and I got very close with the "cancer community." I donate to St Jude's children's research hospital every year.

Needless to say, when something like this happens, it really hits home for me. I have seen my mother go through many tough times with her friends and family that have been affected by cancer.

Let's do this for OP's family and children.

-jaytrader

PS: If the FWF administration team has an issue with this, please contact me ASAP.

Thanks for the kind words, mikk.

tigi said:   jaytrader said:   
I guess you're going to make me say it again? I wanted to make sure the OP wasn't a scam artist before I go giving people's money away. Frankly, I believe the OP and his wife are nice people, but it hasn't even been a week.

Oh, and, the PayPal account is tied to my name, address, bank account, etc.... It's not as easy as you make it seem.



I still do not get it, how is it any different from you being a scam artist ? As to paypal, you can send whatever have been donated so far to the OP and ask him to set up his own paypal donation account and make changes on the donation website/page.


I'll tell you why - because there is no way I would ever set up a donation site for myself. And I certainly wouldn't manage this on. I came here to get advice and input from a community that I trust. Anything that Jaytrader has elected to do for my family on his own is a wonderful thing. It also has nothing to do my original post, or why I created it. In fact, all this talk about it clutters up the great replies that are getting submitted about the topic at hand.

I'm sorry if I'm coming across as unappreciative. My entire family is very touched by everyone's generosity. But as someone else said a few posts above, I'm just trying to focus on the discussion at hand. I would rather this thread not devolve into chaos because people are overly concerned about how frequently I draw checks from a fund that I didn't solicit and that I don't monitor.

Pretty amazing how FWF members donated like $1000 in the first day with no idea who the person really is. I myself have doubts, but I'm one of the very cautionary and I'm in no financial position to be donating money right now anyways. I can seek and spread advice all the time though.

Has anyone given to this organization or one like it to help defray someone's medical expenses?
The Medical Assistance Foundation (http://www.medicalassistancefoundation.org/) is a 501(c)3 and they let you designate the specific person whose medical care you want to give towards. I don't believe they'll give to anyone, but don't know the details on how it works.

The benefit is that the donation is tax-deductible. I'm not sure how this works because I thought gifts to an individual could not be deducted. I'm assuming it's because they don't guarantee that your funds will go to a specific person's care, it is just a request.

OP - might be worth looking into if your insurance doesn't cover all your costs or if you happen to lose coverage because of having to leave the workforce.

Kashisti- I just read the thread today. My condolences for everything your going through. This group will do an amazing job advising the financial side of things. Hopefully you've got a good support network for the emotional component. I'm not a consellor by any stretch of the imagination, but I am just down the road in Richmond/Bon Air. If you want to vent to someone, let me know and we'll find a coffee shop or something.

gtstinger said:   Kashisti- I just read the thread today. My condolences for everything your going through. This group will do an amazing job advising the financial side of things. Hopefully you've got a good support network for the emotional component. I'm not a consellor by any stretch of the imagination, but I am just down the road in Richmond/Bon Air. If you want to vent to someone, let me know and we'll find a coffee shop or something.

Greened like a mofo.

Have you considered the Heisenberg solution? Sorry, couldn't resist, and I can believe it's page 6 and not a single Breaking Bad reference.

On a serious note, read this article to get a better understanding of the medical bills you will be receiving. It's truly and eye opener on the state of the medical industrial complex in America.

You have my deepest sympathies. One thing no one has mentioned yet. Especially with high deductible plans, you should always obtain codes and pricing for every procedure, and check with the doctor's office and insurance company on amounts to be billed and paid, and write down names and times of call. You should attempt to negotiate down all costs in any way possible both before and after the fact. I have found that if you negotiate down a bill after the fact, the doctor will typically not report the change to the insurance company, so the money you don't end up paying still counts towards your deductible and OOP maximum. This has helped me a number of times where doctors bill absurd amounts for stupid things (example, $75 for a 50 cent foam finger splint) or do wildly expensive procedures without telling me in advance that they are expensive (wife 2 minute sono, $1500, not even necessary). You can PM me and I'll be happy to call you for some more insurance tips and tricks.

Best wishes OP...in case it has not been mentioned, please pump up yor immune system as much as possible in order to fight not only the cancer, but as well the side effects of the chemo & radiation which will take their own toll. Research as much as possible on complimentary therapies, nutrition, etc. Fight it in any way you possibly can & live!

One thought to keep in mind, whether we live for one day or 100 years we are all just "in costume" in our bodies, our souls, spirits live on.

Please watch this video when you have an hour:

http://www.btci.org/bioethics/2012/videos2012/vid3.html

OP, prayers your way. This definitely seems like a hope for the best/plan for the worst situation. One of my best friends lost his wife suddenly a little over a year ago. That situation and this thread are good indicators of one thing: people want to help. Many of us (and you have noted this about yourself) are reluctant to accept "charity" ... but another way to look at it is that you are being kind to the rest of us. Feeling helpful makes US feel better (this is partly why FWF and FW in general work). With that in mind, think of ways that friends and family can help NOW that is not directly monetary (though if they want to donate monetarily, go for it). Put out there that you'd like to have a a decade of date-nights with your wife in the next two years, if people can watch the kids. And when the offers come in, ACCEPT them (yes, you'll want to spend some time with the kids, too, but it is okay to spend some just with the wife). Maybe you know someone that has good video skills that can help you make tapes for the kids, or photographers who will do some family photos. Tell people that the family would love to be invited to dinner ... those connections can also be support to your family afterward. And prepare your wife to accept charity afterward. My friend's daughter's care provider offered to cover full daycare for free (when they had been going about 1/3 time beforehand). Someone posted something about meals above ... have some people who can mobilize in case things get bad for awhile during treatment and you just need people to bring over some food, do some laundry, or run a vacuum through the house.

$1,532.90!

I admire the OPs courage facing this diagnosis. Hopefully the terminal thing is overblown and 10 years from now he can use the donated funds to pay it forward to someone else in a similar situation.

Lots of good financial advice here and I won't go through the numbers... just want to echo that life insurance should last for 15+ years and not be spent in large chunks no matter how seemingly important the goal (mortgage payoff, car, etc).

For your family... this could be a whole other thread... hug everyone a little harder. Get a family picture while you are still healthy. If things start going downhill, make B-day cards for the kids in advance or handwritten messages to send on certain dates. Every little thing you can do to give them love even if you're not here really makes a difference. The kids are a little young and I realize you're right at the start of treatment, but when you're up to it you might consider a special vacation like Disney.

You're in my thoughts and prayers. Wishing you many more years of good health!

Donated. Best of luck with your situation, OP--sending thoughts and prayers to you and your family.

My thoughts are with your family. Your situation inspired me to look at my own and found a "Option to accelerate payment of death benefits" where you can start taking the death benefit before you pass in either a lump sum or over time if your time on this earth is <12 months (when\if you ever get to this point).

I'm sure the clever mind here could come up with some ways to maximize this if you have this option. A few ideas I had was split the payments over the tax year to lower your income\tax impact or possibly take a payment and invest it sooner in some tax shelter so it gains interests now.

I know about a friend of a friend who tried the ketogenic diet with a stage 4 brain cancer. Unfortunately, it did not work for him and he passed away. I don't know if he ate a few carbs every day.

Despite this result, I would do it anyway. The science seems sound. There is a Youtube video from UCSF about the link between cancer and sugar. The only thing I would change is to make sure that it is literally zero carbs. That means no veggies.

Best wishes OP on whatever you decide to do.

Not sure if it would help you but http://www.patientslikeme.com/ may be worth looking at.

If you learned you had a life-changing illness, broadcasting it on the Internet might be the last thing on your mind. But PatientsLikeMe encourages people to do just that. Founded by Ben and James Heywood after their brother Stephen received a diagnosis of Lou Gehrig's disease, the site is a kind of Facebook for the chronically ill. It holds thousands of profiles of patients living with diseases as diverse as multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's and H.I.V., with a special section for mood disorders like depression and anxiety. Patients can use slick visual tools to chart their symptoms over time, rate their drugs and treatments, and track their progress against fellow patients with a degree of transparency that borders on the voyeuristic. Users should be aware that the site shares data, stripped of names and other identifying material, with nonprofit groups, research hospitals and pharmaceutical companies. http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html?res=9E03EFDB123FF933A...

I thought of Make-A-Wish as another resource that might be available to Kashisti, but discovered that their programs are only for kids. I found this list on their website - it cites similar programs for adults (source is http://www.wish.org/about/contact/faqs).

Does Make-A-Wish grant adult wishes?

The Make-A-Wish Foundation does not grant wishes to adults over the age of 18. Read more about our specific eligibility requirements. Other wish-granting organizations serve those over the age of 18. The following is a list of some organizations that may grant wishes or provide other services to those over the age of 18:

Air Charity Network - http://aircharitynetwork.org

The Angel Foundation - http://www.theangelfoundation.net

Dream Catchers, USA - http://www.dreamcatchersusa.org

Dream Foundation - http://www.dreamfoundation.com

Jeremy Bloom's Wish of a Lifetime - http://www.seniorwish.org

Second Wind Dreams - http://www.secondwind.org

Unity, A Journey of Hope - http://www.unityajourneyofhope.org

Kashisti: You lend strength to us all in how you are facing your and your family's situation. Thank you for sharing your problem with the Fatwallet community and allowing us to be a small part in your story. I haven't a financial background that is worthy of lending advice (Thanks to all that do and have shared!), but I do have a Paypal account. I've made a donation and hope to make another.

Jaytrader: Thank you for setting up the donation site and checking and sharing the facts. I'm pleased that I have an opportunity to help even in a small way.

Fatwallet Moderators: We've all saved tons of Fatwallet cash through your incredible network of sharing great deals. Might Fatwallet lend us a hand in helping Kashisti by allowing us to donate some of that Fatwallet cash to him?

savylady said:   Kashisti: You lend strength to us all in how you are facing your and your family's situation. Thank you for sharing your problem with the Fatwallet community and allowing us to be a small part in your story. I haven't a financial background that is worthy of lending advice (Thanks to all that do and have shared!), but I do have a Paypal account. I've made a donation and hope to make another.

Jaytrader: Thank you for setting up the donation site and checking and sharing the facts. I'm pleased that I have an opportunity to help even in a small way.

Fatwallet Moderators: We've all saved tons of Fatwallet cash through your incredible network of sharing great deals. Might Fatwallet lend us a hand in helping Kashisti by allowing us to donate some of that Fatwallet cash to him?


It's my pleasure. $1,619.08.

savylady said:   

Fatwallet Moderators: We've all saved tons of Fatwallet cash through your incredible network of sharing great deals. Might Fatwallet lend us a hand in helping Kashisti by allowing us to donate some of that Fatwallet cash to him?


+100

PayPal refused to take my Visa GC, I even registered it to my name and address - still no go. Any help?

you have to add is as a card first while logged into paypal (dont try to add it when making a payment, you have to just go to paypal.com and login and add the card first), but then they will put a $1 hold. If they are not letting you add it, they wont allow that particular Visa GC.



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