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Does anyone here have experience with Chase's Return Protection program or dispute resolution in general, as compared to AMEX?

I've used an AMEX card for several years for any item that I thought I might want to return, especially when dealing with a merchant with a poor return policy (e.g. Best Buy), because of AMEX's Return Protection program and their generally good dispute resolution.

I now have a Chase Sapphire Preferred card, and I'm wondering if it's reasonable to move those transactions to it, setting aside any concerns about other perks (e.g. Chase UR points).

Here's a blog post answering the question, but I'd appreciate the additional wisdom of folks here.

http://www.dansdeals.com/archives/5907

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I've always have terrible luck with Chase since 1982, back then they were known as Chase Manhattan. I refuse to use any Chase product anymore. I still do have Chase accounts, but that's because they bought my old banks out (they bought Bank Of NY branches and Washington Mutual). I can write a short story on my crappy experience with Chase. So with that, I avoid dealing with Chase as much as possible.

On the other hand with AMEX, I've had WONDERFUL experience. However the return process is ok, and can be a bit of pain. Make sure you have brands, model #, invoice, receipts handy - statement charge won't do it. You also need to ship the item back with your own money. So if you ordered something that's huge and heavy, forget it. Total turn around time for my most recent filing was 2 weeks. Filed on line, within 2 days, I received an email asking for itemized invoice. After submission of the invoice, took another day or two. Asked to ship the item back with tracking number. Once the item was received, it took another 2-3 days before the credit shows up on my account.

I have only one experience with the Chase Sapphire Preferred purchase protection. Unfortunately it was quite negative.

I purchased an item that was subsequently lost. Since I could not describe the exact time and place of the loss they choose to classify it as a "mysterious disappearance" and not a covered event like loss or theft. They were quite inflexible on the point even when faced with the loss of my business. I was disgusted by the whole process, over a ~$90 item no less, and it led to a drastic reduction in my use of Chase products. I only use them for bonus churning now where as before they provided my main spend card and checking account.

In then end I was able to get a credit to cover this years annual fee out of them by way of compensation and I did learn a valuable lesson about how I should frame my description of any future insurance claim. Dont be honest, review the policy and write a description that matches what they require in that policy. That is probably a lesson well worth the aggravation.

arla said:   Does anyone here have experience with Chase's Return Protection program or dispute resolution in general, as compared to AMEX?

I've used an AMEX card for several years for any item that I thought I might want to return, especially when dealing with a merchant with a poor return policy (e.g. Best Buy), because of AMEX's Return Protection program and their generally good dispute resolution.

I now have a Chase Sapphire Preferred card, and I'm wondering if it's reasonable to move those transactions to it, setting aside any concerns about other perks (e.g. Chase UR points).

Here's a blog post answering the question, but I'd appreciate the additional wisdom of folks here.

http://www.dansdeals.com/archives/5907


Why not considering Discover?
They also have price protection. I used once and Discover matched the price, though my card doesn't have the benefit when I purchased.
Discover also has a return protection program.

BryansAccount said:   ...Chase products. I only use them for bonus churning now where as before they provided my main spend card and checking account.

DITTO

None of the credit card companies are that great. But, of the ones I have dealt with AMEX is the best on billing errors, returns etc.

I get the impression that AMEX actually wants to help card holders. Don't get that impression with Chase, Citi etc.

By the way, in my experience, Discover is the worst, right up there on the roll of dishonor with Capital One.

When you grow up in NY, you learn 4 things are the enemy:
The dept. of motor vehicles
The phone co.
Citibank
Chase.

Enough said. They all live down to that reputation daily.

fir2 said:   When you grow up in NY, you learn 4 things are the enemy:
The dept. of motor vehicles
The phone co.
Citibank
Chase.

Enough said. They all live down to that reputation daily.

In California it is:
PG&E (Pigs, Greed & Extortion)
Any California government agency that says they want to help
The DMV
Bank Of America

As far as my experience with Chase goes, they have always been great to me. I haven't had any experience with their return protection, but their CC fraud department had caught numerous fraudulent charges on my account.

Back in the dial up world, when AOL would offer you free months of service, I got a postcard from them offering just that. I availed myself of the offer (specifically stating it when talking to the representative when signing up), which required a valid credit card, since you would be charged for subsequent months if you did not cancel before the end of the trial period. I used a Chase credit card, which is not really relevant, except that it was either a VISA or Mastercard. I was charged, and AOL gave me the finger when I complained. I disputed the charge with Chase. Faxing in the appropriate form with a copy of the postcard/offer I received. Chase reversed the charge. AOL then had a collection agency try to extract the money from me. After calling Chase, then the parent company of either VISA or Mastercard (I don't know for sure which one) to find out what agreement they have with merchants that accept their card as payment regarding disputed charges, I was told that when the charge is disputed in favor of a customer, VISA or Mastercard (whichever it was) 'steps out of the picture'. Basically I was told that there is nothing in the agreement that says that if a customer is fraudulently charged, disputes the charge, and it's decided in the customer's favor, the merchant agrees to abide by the decision, and you won anything. Now, if the merchant wants to harass, intimidate, or otherwise try to extract the payment from you, use collection agencies, post false information on your credit report, there is nothing in the credit card agreement preventing them from doing so. This, being a universal policy, would not be limited to Chase, or any other specific bank.

As others have stated, AMEX is probably the way to go. I have several electronic items go bad over the last 5 years and they would refund the money without question for items less than 200-300 bucks. For bigger items, they might investigate and ask you to do a repair (which they will pay for or refund if it is unfixable). I had them refund the purchase price of a DSLR ($800), which was unfixable in addition to smaller items such as a Blu-ray player, an iPhone and a printer.

AMEX is definitely the way to go. They certainly try to help in the case of loss or theft. I had an iPad and iPod get stolen in college. Got the police report and within a month had the money credited back to my card. It seems they actually try to help whereas with Citi, they just look for a way out.

A co-worker had a case of this and it seemed as though someone would have had to take it from her, with her watching, to be classified as theft. If you left it on a table, and returned later and it wasn't there....it's not specifically theft. Even if police report says as much but doesn't use the word "stolen" or "theft" you're out of luck.

I think the best way to sum it up is that AMEX just assumes you're telling the truth and wants some paperwork for due dilligence. Everyone else assumes you are lying and wants paper work to prove it's definitely theft.



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