• Go to page :
  • 1 234
  • Text Only
Voting History
rated:
I've been offered a position at a competitor from the Company I work at, let's call them Company B. Company A (current employer) has a tendency to terminate employees immediately who put in their two weeks for security reasons and because they're worried that the employee will recruit others to Company B or anywhere else. I've have previous colleagues receive 2 weeks pay and some didn't receive 2 weeks pay after this termination. Since I have an abundant amount of sick and vacation time left, should I

1. Leave under "good terms" and put in my 2 weeks with a good chance of being fired and the chance that they won't pay for 2 weeks of work and/or vacation time.
2. Work my last day before I start at Company B and tell them I'm resigning.
3. Use all my sick and vacation time and send an email to my current employer (Company A) that I'm resigning and to pack my belongings in a box for me to pick up at the security guard desk.

New position won't start in 3 weeks, so I can use sick time for a week and play golf then put in my 2 weeks notice. However if they terminate me, would I be able to claim any type of unemployment? Also how would I keep my health insurance until my new benefits kick in after 90 days?



EDIT Option 4. Tell them that I'm going to Company B on my last day with a 2 weeks notice with the hopes that they pay me 2 weeks and get double income!

Member Summary
Most Recent Posts
It might be tempting to go this route but it's trap! Studies have shown that most people who plan to leave a company bu... (more)

rsrvoir (May. 14, 2013 @ 10:44a) |

4 months ago I gave my old company 2 weeks notice. I informed them I was leaving for a competitor. The next day I was wa... (more)

DaveTheStud (May. 18, 2013 @ 4:26p) |

I'm embarrassed to admit this, but this is very similar to my situation. I joined my present company, got a promotion/tr... (more)

Pagannagap (May. 19, 2013 @ 7:01p) |

Thanks for visiting FatWallet.com. Join for free to remove this ad.

I would definitely opt for (1). At my company, they will escort you out when you put in your notice, but will give you 2 weeks pay and any vacation accrued. Some jobs are more sensitive than others.

OmarLittle666 said:   I've been offered a position at a competitor from the Company I work at, let's call them Company B. Company A (current employer) has a tendency to terminate employees immediately who put in their two weeks for security reasons and because they're worried that the employee will recruit others to Company B or anywhere else. I've have previous colleagues receive 2 weeks pay and some didn't receive 2 weeks pay after this termination. Since I have an abundant amount of sick and vacation time left, should I

1. Leave under "good terms" and put in my 2 weeks with a good chance of being fired and the chance that they won't pay for 2 weeks of work and/or vacation time.
2. Work my last day before I start at Company B and tell them I'm resigning.
3. Use all my sick and vacation time and send an email to my current employer (Company A) that I'm resigning and to pack my belongings in a box for me to pick up at the security guard desk.

New position won't start in 3 weeks, so I can use sick time for a week and play golf then put in my 2 weeks notice. However if they terminate me, would I be able to claim any type of unemployment? Also how would I keep my health insurance until my new benefits kick in after 90 days?

Check your state law regarding whether unused vacation or sick time must be paid. Some states are more friendly (CA); others less so (NY). If you don't get paid for unused vacation, now would be a fine time to go on vacation for a week or two.

You won't get unemployment if you resign.

You will get the option to sign up for COBRA to continue your present healthcare at your own expense to bridge the gap til you start the next job. This can be free for 60 days since you have that long to retroactively pay for COBRA (if you need it), or not pay anything if you make it to the start of your next job and everything is fine (both health-wise and new job-wise).

Personally, I'd look at how they treated other employees that tried to leave on good terms. If they screwed them on the way out, I'd give as little notice as my contract required (if any). If they're reasonable, I'd give them two weeks.

xerty said:   OmarLittle666 said:   I've been offered a position at a competitor from the Company I work at, let's call them Company B. Company A (current employer) has a tendency to terminate employees immediately who put in their two weeks for security reasons and because they're worried that the employee will recruit others to Company B or anywhere else. I've have previous colleagues receive 2 weeks pay and some didn't receive 2 weeks pay after this termination. Since I have an abundant amount of sick and vacation time left, should I

1. Leave under "good terms" and put in my 2 weeks with a good chance of being fired and the chance that they won't pay for 2 weeks of work and/or vacation time.
2. Work my last day before I start at Company B and tell them I'm resigning.
3. Use all my sick and vacation time and send an email to my current employer (Company A) that I'm resigning and to pack my belongings in a box for me to pick up at the security guard desk.

New position won't start in 3 weeks, so I can use sick time for a week and play golf then put in my 2 weeks notice. However if they terminate me, would I be able to claim any type of unemployment? Also how would I keep my health insurance until my new benefits kick in after 90 days?

Check your state law regarding whether unused vacation or sick time must be paid. Some states are more friendly (CA); others less so (NY). If you don't get paid for unused vacation, now would be a fine time to go on vacation for a week or two.

You won't get unemployment if you resign.

You will get the option to sign up for COBRA to continue your present healthcare at your own expense to bridge the gap til you start the next job. This can be free for 60 days since you have that long to retroactively pay for COBRA (if you need it), or not pay anything if you make it to the start of your next job and everything is fine (both health-wise and new job-wise).

Personally, I'd look at how they treated other employees that tried to leave on good terms. If they screwed them on the way out, I'd give as little notice as my contract required (if any). If they're reasonable, I'd give them two weeks.


From who I've spoken too in the past, it's 50-50 whether they'll pay you for the 2 weeks or not. Which is why it's becoming harder to choose my Path.

go for the bucks -- screw your company, trust me, if if was the other way around and they wanted to terminate you more than likely you wouldn't be compensated for that time.

You should check your employee handbook regarding sick/vacation time. Generally they spell out whether they will pay out vacation and sick time. In most jurisdictions if they say in the handbook they pay out vacation time or sick time they have to do so or be in violation of the law.

If you are sure they will not want you to work after giving the two weeks notice (regardless if they will pay for the 2 weeks or not) why not just give them the 2 weeks notice right before (or a few days before at most) you start at company B. Therefore if they end up paying you for the two weeks then you end up have double income for that 2 weeks.

Snezz said:   If you are sure they will not want you to work after giving the two weeks notice (regardless if they will pay for the 2 weeks or not) why not just give them the 2 weeks notice right before (or a few days before at most) you start at company B. Therefore if they end up paying you for the two weeks then you end up have double income for that 2 weeks.

Trust me I've thought of that.

It really depends on where on the food chain you are but a lot of companies show you to the door due to risk and liability issues. Doubly so if you are going to work with a competitor. Best to try to leave on as best of terms as possible (2 week notice) but if they have a history of screwing folks over on their way out go for the money. Unless you burn bridges they won't remember how you left a few years from now if you wanted to return.


Good luck

Depends what you value more, 2 weeks pay or a good relationship with your former employer.

Shouldn't he be able to have both?

The world really is small. Consider that the actions you take today with the people of today can have impact on you YEARS down the line. First things first, if Company B doesn't work out do you have a backup plan? If you burn Company A you might be out of work for a fair amount of time. Who know, the management may change out and you may want to go back to Company A 5 years from now.

Also consider that some of your coworkers may be your boss someday or may work somewhere else you may interview. Do you want to be known as the guy that burned his employer?

Bottom line, don't burn the bridge if there is any other choice.

I offered my company six weeks notice and was immediately terminated and successfully won an unemployment hearing. My only statement was I would be at work right now if they hadn't fired me.

If you hate their !%$#@! walk out at the worst time for them. Otherwise, leave notice.

BrlDsguise said:   I offered my company six weeks notice and was immediately terminated and successfully won an unemployment hearing. My only statement was I would be at work right now if they hadn't fired me.

You reminded me of what happened with my first job a long time ago. I worked at a company owned Taco Bell. I had enough of the place and left noticed I'm resigining. The bozo manager said I couldn't since he's firing me. I didn't get my final paycheck for weeks. I went to the California state labor board, filed a complaint how they're not paying overtime when required, money due me for withholding my final pay for so long, and filed for unemployment (I wasn't unemployed for very long). This whole issue went to a hearing before a labor commissioner. I won on all issues. I only collected a few thousand dollars, but was happy that I proved to myself I don't need to let some stupid company take advantage of me.

Don't do any extra than is demanded by the law and your employee handbook.

Let me offer a slightly different perspective. If you're not in high tech or another field where regular job changes are acceptable or encouraged, and you're also not very early in your career where continuing education is expected, then in-demand professionals get few chances for a true break in between jobs. I've switched jobs 1 real time and greatly enjoyed the 4 weeks with family during the transition. I didn't care about maximizing the last dollar and I also ensured I didn't lose any benefits coming to me.

Will you leave any co-workers/bosses hanging or picking up a mess (projects, responsibilities, processes) if you bail immediately? Shafting a corporate entity is fine if you want, but your peers and boss are your professional network should paths/jobs cross again someday.

If you are essential to operations, 2 weeks is fair to allow time to transition your responsibilities cleanly.

KYBOSH said:   It really depends on where on the food chain you are but a lot of companies show you to the door due to risk and liability issues. Doubly so if you are going to work with a competitorOP, are you going to tell Company A that you are going to Company B ?

+1 to Venturion's advice. An unexpected vacation might be nice. I am assuming you're not living paycheck to paycheck and 2 weeks salary isn't going to matter. Most companies aren't going to give time off without pay under *any* circumstances unless required to by law. Especially for high-paid workers that are in demand.

A general ?. If employees are expected to give notice, then why aren't employers bound to do the same when terming people? Notice longer than a "You're fired. 5 minutes to get out!"

I left a corporate run job over a year ago. I spoke to my supervisor in the AM that I would work that day, but then I was done. Best thing I ever did!

TravelerMSY said:   A general ?. If employees are expected to give notice, then why aren't employers bound to do the same when terming people? Notice longer than a "You're fired. 5 minutes to get out!"

If your SO came and told you they were leaving you for someone else but offered to give you 2 weeks of continued service ... would you take it?


A lot of this depends on the type of work. In my old job, projects lasted between an hour and 5 days, and there was a healthy pool of us that were basically interchangeable. Quitting on the first day a 5 day project would be unprofessional. Saying you're done at the end of the day while you're on a 1 day job would be no big deal.

KYBOSH said:   TravelerMSY said:   A general ?. If employees are expected to give notice, then why aren't employers bound to do the same when terming people? Notice longer than a "You're fired. 5 minutes to get out!"

If your SO came and told you they were leaving you for someone else but offered to give you 2 weeks of continued service ... would you take it?



Depends on the service, I guess. That's not a very good analogy though, unless you and your employer have some kind of weird emotional attachment to each other.

Where am I supposed to find out if I am expected to give 2 weeks notice? My offer letter said it was employment at will and both parties could terminate at any time. I don't recall signing anything on my first day that mentioned this.

TravelerMSY said:   A general ?. If employees are expected to give notice, then why aren't employers bound to do the same when terming people? Notice longer than a "You're fired. 5 minutes to get out!"

I was actually given three months notice before a layoff.

TravelerMSY said:   A general ?. If employees are expected to give notice, then why aren't employers bound to do the same when terming people? Notice longer than a "You're fired. 5 minutes to get out!"

What kind of work do you think you would get out of people if you did give that kind of notice?

Theft, destruction, etc. There are reasons why people are escorted from the building.

Treat your employer with the same respect they'd treat YOU with if they were finished with YOU. If they'd kick you out of the door with 5 minutes notice you owe them the same level of respect, i.e. none.

The pussy "give them notice then lose 2 weeks pay" attitude is why employers think it's OK to call you at 3AM on a Saturday morning. Grow a pair.

ganda said:   Treat your employer with the same respect they'd treat YOU with if they were finished with YOU. If they'd kick you out of the door with 5 minutes notice you owe them the same level of respect, i.e. none.

The pussy "give them notice then lose 2 weeks pay" attitude is why employers think it's OK to call you at 3AM on a Saturday morning. Grow a pair.


See TravelerMSY... perfectly good analogy!

Don't forget to leave a big steamy loaf on your desk.

Take a couple of sick days. Ask for a 2 week vacation. Granted 2 request. Then turn in your notice on the day of the vacation. Win!

My brother just took a new job. He had vacation saved. In PA, employers do not have to pay for earned sick or vacation time. His new position did not start for 3 weeks and he was going to take a week long vacation in 3 days.

He decided to put in his notice and tell them he would take his vacation AND work 2 weeks. Now keep in mind, this is a smallish (less than 100 employees) company and he is the ONLY one who knows how to do his job and it is network administrator and security. This is a healthcare IT company.

They turned around and told him the next day that the day before his vacation would be his last, he would not be paid vacation, he would not even get to work until the new job started AND he would not get paid out. To boot, they raided his desk and STOLE his personal USB drives and demanded he supplied them with detailed instructions on how to do his job.

I will and forever give a moments notice, especially if vacation / sick time is involved unless the company has a strict policy of paying these benefits out.

MADWAD said:   My brother just took a new job. He had vacation saved. In PA, employers do not have to pay for earned sick or vacation time. His new position did not start for 3 weeks and he was going to take a week long vacation in 3 days.

He decided to put in his notice and tell them he would take his vacation AND work 2 weeks. Now keep in mind, this is a smallish (less than 100 employees) company and he is the ONLY one who knows how to do his job and it is network administrator and security. This is a healthcare IT company.

They turned around and told him the next day that the day before his vacation would be his last, he would not be paid vacation, he would not even get to work until the new job started AND he would not get paid out. To boot, they raided his desk and STOLE his personal USB drives and demanded he supplied them with detailed instructions on how to do his job.

I will and forever give a moments notice, especially if vacation / sick time is involved unless the company has a strict policy of paying these benefits out.

It sounds like they gave up all leverage once they made their intentions clear of not paying sick/vacation time, and they gave up any semblance of acting in good faith once they took his personal property, so I wouldn't see any reason to comply with their "demand" at that point.

Wow. The sole IT guy leaves and they play hardball? Seems like they would be at his mercy to play nice. At that point, he should have said "OK, since you're stealing my vacation days, how about *right now* as my last day!" It's going to cost them 3x to bring someone in to figure everything out quick.

TravelerMSY said:   Wow. The sole IT guy leaves and they play hardball? Seems like they would be at his mercy to play nice. At that point, he should have said "OK, since you're stealing my vacation days, how about *right now* as my last day!" It's going to cost them 3x to bring someone in to figure everything out quick.
Right, seriously. "I quit. You do remember the admin passwords, right? Heres my email and my consulting rate is $500/hour, paid in advance."

ganda said:   Treat your employer with the same respect they'd treat YOU with if they were finished with YOU. If they'd kick you out of the door with 5 minutes notice you owe them the same level of respect, i.e. none.

The pussy "give them notice then lose 2 weeks pay" attitude is why employers think it's OK to call you at 3AM on a Saturday morning. Grow a pair.
While I completely understand your point, there is another angle to it that you don't mention: sounds like the employer might doesn't care - if he walks out, he likely won't be making a worthwhile point to the company itself - so "sticking it to them" when they don't care would be a hollow victory.

But consider the fellow employees might care for various reasons - those that report to him, and/or those at the same level (and maybe even some of the managers). If he is likely to encounter those people in future jobs (and unless you move towns and/or industries, chances are good), it would be in his best interest to not leave on bad terms - they will remember, and they will be the ones that his next employer asks ("hey, you worked at that company at the same time he did - what did you think of him?").

Marc

dbond79 said:    and demanded he supplied them with detailed instructions on how to do his job


Very well my consulting rate is $500 an hour with a minimum of 40 hours. As soon as you sign the contract I will be glad to start working on the instructions.

I personally can't see a lot of upside to ever leaving on bad terms. A week after you leave, nobody will ever remember you "sticking it to the man." Pride is a such a worthless quality. Why would you jeopardize your future career? You never know who your next boss or co-worker will be. Granted I am in a small industry, but I can't tell you how many times I've worked with the same person/company/manager.

I also echo the advice of taking some time off if you can afford it. You have your whole life to work. Enjoy the process.

I would try to maximize your opportunities and leave on a professional note.

Skipping 84 Messages...
rsrvoir said:   kjl1977 said:   Have you considered asking Company A for a promotion/raise to keep you there (in a way that makes you look like you really want to stay)? In that situation, at least you are showing an interest in staying and being 'loyal' - maybe that would make them a little less trigger happy. The benefit of them terminating you in that case is that you'd probably have a better case for unemployment or other benefits. You can provide 'proof' that you approached management (perhaps send and print an e-mail in addition to talking with them) in the hope of staying on, but with a request for better pay. If they fire you at that point, they are more 'in the wrong' because you didn't come out and say 'I'm leaving'.

It might be tempting to go this route but it's trap! Studies have shown that most people who plan to leave a company but stay due to a counteroffer/raise/promotion end up leaving within 6 months anyway. In my experience, if a company will straight up offer me what I'm worth, I have much more upward potential there than a company who will match only because they want to keep me from leaving (which is only them protecting their interests, not trying to do right by me). Example, I basically sat on my butt at a languishing job for 8 years before I finally left for a 40% raise (declining their attempt to counter). Less than a year later I left that place for a 33% raise (again declining their offer to counter). Best two career decisions of my life.


I'm embarrassed to admit this, but this is very similar to my situation. I joined my present company, got a promotion/transfer to another department, and a 30% raise after 10 months. Sat for 7 years, working away, taking on lots of new responsibility, and saw (far too late) that nothing was coming. Went back to school, did some passive looking, and an opportunity to work a few miles from my house came up (eventually) with another 30% raise.

The problem with counter-offers is that it might not solve the issue that you're trying to move away from, and you may find yourself with extra work, and less respect and opportunities from management. This seems to be especially true the lower down the chain you are.



Disclaimer: By providing links to other sites, FatWallet.com does not guarantee, approve or endorse the information or products available at these sites, nor does a link indicate any association with or endorsement by the linked site to FatWallet.com.

Thanks for visiting FatWallet.com. Join for free to remove this ad.

TRUSTe online privacy certification

While FatWallet makes every effort to post correct information, offers are subject to change without notice.
Some exclusions may apply based upon merchant policies.
© 1999-2014