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The biggest thing about onsite education that the online group will miss out on is a peer network. I know that my peer networks have been a huge benefit for me (referred in, directly hired by a college senior etc.). These networks are especially useful when you need them the most (e.g. 2001 and 2008).

The best thing about being referred in is when your resume reaches the HR via your would be boss (or bosses boss). The entire power equation between the candidate and the HR is turned upside down during salary negotiation. This makes a huge $$ difference over time.

Disclaimer: You will earn a link to your degree, not physical paper to hang on wall.

Just kidding.

puddonhead said:   The biggest thing about onsite education that the online group will miss out on is a peer network. I know that my peer networks have been a huge benefit for me (referred in, directly hired by a college senior etc.). These networks are especially useful when you need them the most (e.g. 2001 and 2008).

The best thing about being referred in is when your resume reaches the HR via your would be boss (or bosses boss). The entire power equation between the candidate and the HR is turned upside down during salary negotiation. This makes a huge $$ difference over time.


I think this depends on the mindset of the student and if the student recognizes the value of networking. Until recently I've been taking my gen ed classes online, and not really thought about the value of networking with the motivated students in the class. last year I started my upper divisional classes, and group work and discussion boards were a major component. In each of those classes I looked through all the published work (which you're supposed to do anyways) such as discussion posts or group presentations trying to find the "successful" students, and I sent them a PM about how they really stand out from the crowd and asked if they wanted to participate in an online study group, and then went in to explaining the long term advantage of a professional network and how little work it took to establish those connections at this point. For those who agreed, we all met once a week online for an hour, so a 4-5 hour commitment for all my classes, while accomplishing some learning and developing a network. About a month before the semester would end I would send a PM reminding them of the long term career value of peer networks, followed by a request to add them on linked-in. So far everyone who joined the study group has agreed with me and I've grown my professional network with a lot more people than I would have on campus, though some of those connections are more superficial than others.

I think the biggest problem in this regard is that most 18 year olds do not realize these connections will be valuable in their mid to late 20's and beyond, and so they don't start to develop them, I know I didn't and I wish I had; The only good job I've had so far came from a professional reference through a hobby group, and that reference overcame my lack of a degree while competing with 2 other qualified candidates. Now that I want to advance my career I wish I had made more connections when I was younger to improve my odds of stepping up.

I'm surprised nobody is mentioning the possibility of a hybrid on-line/on-site degree.

To me that sounds like the likely outcome. Why stop by crushing 2nd tier, 3rd tier and all the online universities? Why not take a whack at community colleges as well?

I can see a model where a 4 year degree is 2 years on-line remote, then for your major you pay the extra bucks (provided you pass all your online courses) for the classes which are better suited to a traditional university setting.

Or, some other hybrid model where perhaps certain semesters you are off-site and other semesters on site (with variable tuition costs), or perhaps a model where you travel to the university for a few weeks each semester for the parts of your courses which do not translate well to an online setting.

outtawhack said:   I'm surprised nobody is mentioning the possibility of a hybrid on-line/on-site degree.

To me that sounds like the likely outcome. Why stop by crushing 2nd tier, 3rd tier and all the online universities? Why not take a whack at community colleges as well?

I can see a model where a 4 year degree is 2 years on-line remote, then for your major you pay the extra bucks (provided you pass all your online courses) for the classes which are better suited to a traditional university setting.

Or, some other hybrid model where perhaps certain semesters you are off-site and other semesters on site (with variable tuition costs), or perhaps a model where you travel to the university for a few weeks each semester for the parts of your courses which do not translate well to an online setting.


The 15th best MBA program in the country is Indiana University Kelley School of Business. You have the option no questions asked to move from the online program to the on location program or vise versa. So you can do 1st year online and 2nd year in Indiana or 1st year in Indiana and 2nd year online, etc.

dshibb said:   outtawhack said:   I'm surprised nobody is mentioning the possibility of a hybrid on-line/on-site degree.

To me that sounds like the likely outcome. Why stop by crushing 2nd tier, 3rd tier and all the online universities? Why not take a whack at community colleges as well?

I can see a model where a 4 year degree is 2 years on-line remote, then for your major you pay the extra bucks (provided you pass all your online courses) for the classes which are better suited to a traditional university setting.

Or, some other hybrid model where perhaps certain semesters you are off-site and other semesters on site (with variable tuition costs), or perhaps a model where you travel to the university for a few weeks each semester for the parts of your courses which do not translate well to an online setting.


The 15th best MBA program in the country is Indiana University Kelley School of Business. You have the option no questions asked to move from the online program to the on location program or vise versa. So you can do 1st year online and 2nd year in Indiana or 1st year in Indiana and 2nd year online, etc.


There are doctorates issued this way. Valdosta State's Doctorate in Public Administration program has gotten popular on the degree forums because of that. Two weekend residencies a year and the rest online coursework and email back and forth on the dissertation. http://ww2.valdosta.edu/pa/mpa/DPAProgramDescription.shtml

Will they accept me if I only have an Associate Degree from community colleges and not a Bachelor's?

calwatch said:   
There are doctorates issued this way. Valdosta State's Doctorate in Public Administration program has gotten popular on the degree forums because of that. Two weekend residencies a year and the rest online coursework and email back and forth on the dissertation. http://ww2.valdosta.edu/pa/mpa/DPAProgramDescription.shtml


I know this was posted a while ago but I'm just now seeing it. My PhD program is in this area so, just to be clear, this DPA is **not** a degree that will be taken seriously by most public policy/political science/public administration programs - so if you want to work in academia, this will just about guarantee never getting a job. Its really only filling a very small niche that won't apply to most people - top level public sector positions where you need a doctorate because everyone else has one due to credentials inflation. And even then I would say its still not worth it assuming you did your MPA from a good (top 20) school.


That tends to be the problem with these sort of online degrees...they aren't taken as seriously as everyone thinks. People in the field are aware of them and - in the case of the Valdosta State DPA, at least - will hire nearly anyone from a traditional PhD program over you.



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