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Hello all-

I am seeking a bit of real world advice regarding building my credit profile. I have a limited credit history (~2.5 years), but have always used the credit I've been extended responsibly. Currently, my FICO is at 765. I have five cards with a total CL of $24,750. In addition to the revolving card accounts, I have three student loans that have been paid in full. I've always paid my cards in full each month and ba r no negative information on my credit report.

Now to my question- how do many of the members here achieve such high credit limits? I understand some comes from automatic and requested increases from the issuer and income can also play a role. Besides maintaining a low credit utilization ratio (which I do anyway), there is no practical reason that I would need higher credit limits than I do now. It just feels good knowing a lender would trust me with higher limits.

Yesterday I applied for the Barclaycard Arrival card in order to take advantage of the decent sign up bonus. I was approved instantly online for a $5k CL. Out of curiosity, I called the recon line to see if I could get a higher CL. The analyst was very polite and looked over my credit report. She said everything looked great and commended me for using credit wisely. When she began looking at the balances I carry, however, her attitude changed a bit. I really don't spend much on my cards, maybe $1200/mo. She said that although I had high credit limits with other lenders and no negative information, I had not demonstrated that I can actually manage a higher credit limit since I never post a balance near any of my limits. Has anyone ever heard of this? I recall that many individuals believe ~10% utilization is the "sweet spot", but can not using credit that has been made available to you hurt your chances of being offered more credit? If so, what can I do to overcome that? Would churning a card actually benefit someone on this situation?

Thanks!

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You need to find lenders that will let you combine credit limits.

Here's how I did it:

I got a card with Navy - they maxed... (more)

Horseymen (Jun. 25, 2013 @ 12:12a) |

Don't feel too bad, my Barclays credit limit is like $500...all my other limits are $15k-20k+.

Porqin (Jun. 25, 2013 @ 1:23a) |

This is excellent! I'll do some research on which lenders still allow reallocation of credit lines. Thanks for the infor... (more)

CraftyCraft (Jun. 25, 2013 @ 1:14p) |

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It's code for: "We don't see how you would be that profitable of a customer to us." She's looking at "highest reported balance" on each of the cards which is a representation of the highest balance you ever achieved and then paid down at some point in you holding that card(which tells them how much they might be able to collect in merchant fees and potentially interest, but mostly they're just concerned about the merchant fees).

2 ways to deal with that:
1) It's a rare issue so quite likely a majority of recon CSRs wouldn't tell you that. So you could just ignore it and realize that shouldn't be an issue often.
2) Try to kill that bird by transferring all of your spending to 1 card for 1 month and get the thing to report a high balance before you pay it off. Then switch the next card and and get all of your spending on that one before paying it off. Then switch to the next, until you've got all of them to report a high balance once before paying it off in full(she probably saw high balances of $0, $0, $500, $1500, $2000 or something like that which tells them they likely wont make any money on you even in merchant fees). If you did that the next time you apply for credit you'll look like a much bigger spender than you actually are and a much more profitable customer than you actually are.

What yearly income did you list on your application? I believe the biggest factors for credit limit are credit score and income.

Each issuer has their own standards for determining credit limit, and I don't think Barclaycards is known for particularly generous credit limits (mine is 6300, and most of the limits on my other cards are 2-3 times that).

From what I can tell, most credit limits are based somewhat loosely on income, as in higher income generally translates to higher credit limits. Haven't heard of a credit company declining a limit increase because of utilization being too low before.

It sort of doesn't make sense to me - from what I can tell on my various credit reports, the credit reports don't list previous balances, only the most recent (e.g. balance history of 0, 0, 0, 1000 would report the same as 5000, 5000, 5000, 1000, assuming a static credit limit). Although some credit cards report the highest balance you've ever had as the limit, as opposed to the actual limit, so that may explain part of it (e.g. if you have a limit of 10000, but have only ever used 3250 of it, some credit cards would report a "limit" of 3250 and some would report a limit of 10000).

What cards do you have?

That's why it is important to take advantage of 0% BT offers (ideally with no fees) from time to time. I always have one or two cards reporting high balances (close to my CL $25K) from time to time which basically show lender that I can manage high limits and have paid the balances in the past.
Also HHI is another factor!

Basically what she's telling you is: you never spend that much money anyway. Why bother me with this nonsense request?

LiquidSilver said:   What yearly income did you list on your application? I believe the biggest factors for credit limit are credit score and income.

I've always wondered what happens if you put infinite income on the applications. How big of a credit line would you get?

Some lenders do not want to see large balances. Each lender has a way of looking at your application. Barclays doesn't love you, so what? You got a good credit limit with them. Show large balances and you may lose Chase and AMEX's favors.

avalon6 said:   LiquidSilver said:   What yearly income did you list on your application? I believe the biggest factors for credit limit are credit score and income.

I've always wondered what happens if you put infinite income on the applications. How big of a credit line would you get?

It would probably get you rejected.

avalon6 said:   LiquidSilver said:   What yearly income did you list on your application? I believe the biggest factors for credit limit are credit score and income.

I've always wondered what happens if you put infinite income on the applications. How big of a credit line would you get?


Here's your IRS form 4506-T. Once we get your tax returns, we'll decide your limit.

BocephusSTL said:   avalon6 said:   LiquidSilver said:   What yearly income did you list on your application? I believe the biggest factors for credit limit are credit score and income.

I've always wondered what happens if you put infinite income on the applications. How big of a credit line would you get?

It would probably get you rejected.


They will ask for your verification of infinite income.

CraftyCraft said:   She said that although I had high credit limits with other lenders and no negative information, I had not demonstrated that I can actually manage a higher credit limit since I never post a balance near any of my limits.If you have the funds available to pay the entire CL of any of your existing CC's, purchase a fully refundable large ticket item on one of your CC's, then wait for the billing cycle to close. Next, PAY THE BILL IN FULL and, at minimum, wait for the payment to POST. Preferably wait for the next billing cycle to CLOSE (i.e. the one in which the large payment was made). Finally, return your fully refundable large ticket item (be sure to do so within its eligible return period!!!) After all of that, you'll end up w/ a LARGE CC PAYMENT posted to your credit report in one month, followed by a large NEGATIVE BALANCE existing on your CC in the following month (where on your credit report, that will likely post as a $0 balance). Once you have a negative balance on your CC, call up the CC issuer and request that they mail you a check for the overpayment amount (to zero out your balance).

dshibb said:   It's code for: "We don't see how you would be that profitable of a customer to us." She's looking at "highest reported balance" on each of the cards which is a representation of the highest balance you ever achieved and then paid down at some point in you holding that card(which tells them how much they might be able to collect in merchant fees and potentially interest, but mostly they're just concerned about the merchant fees).
This is what I was thinking, thanks dshibb.

LiquidSilver said:   What yearly income did you list on your application? I believe the biggest factors for credit limit are credit score and income.
$64,200

aznshadoboy77 said:   What cards do you have?
Chase Freedom: $7k CL
Chase Slate: $2k CL (converted from an old Chase student card, my first card)
AMEX Blue Cash: $5k CL
Edward Jones World (Elan): $10k CL
Discover More: $2750 CL

HiLine said:   Some lenders do not want to see large balances. Each lender has a way of looking at your application. Barclays doesn't love you, so what? You got a good credit limit with them. Show large balances and you may lose Chase and AMEX's favors.
This is a good point. I am really not interested in keeping this card beyond one year (The Barclaycard Arrival card). I am interested in picking up the SallieMae MasterCard issued by Barclaycard in a few months and would like to have a decent limit on it. Has anyone applied for that card? Experiences?

TheDiggler said:   CraftyCraft said:   She said that although I had high credit limits with other lenders and no negative information, I had not demonstrated that I can actually manage a higher credit limit since I never post a balance near any of my limits.If you have the funds available to pay the entire CL of any of your existing CC's, purchase a fully refundable large ticket item on one of your CC's, then wait for the billing cycle to close. Next, PAY THE BILL IN FULL and, at minimum, wait for the payment to POST. Preferably wait for the next billing cycle to CLOSE (i.e. the one in which the large payment was made). Finally, return your fully refundable large ticket item (be sure to do so within its eligible return period!!!) After all of that, you'll end up w/ a LARGE CC PAYMENT posted to your credit report in one month, followed by a large NEGATIVE BALANCE existing on your CC in the following month (where on your credit report, that will likely post as a $0 balance). Once you have a negative balance on your CC, call up the CC issuer and request that they mail you a check for the overpayment amount (to zero out your balance).
TheDiggler, I've read stores of CC companies scoffing at this practice and closing accounts upon issuing checks for a negative balance. Are there any lenders you would suggest to avoid? I remember Chase coming up many times in my searches.

aznshadoboy77 said:   
It sort of doesn't make sense to me - from what I can tell on my various credit reports, the credit reports don't list previous balances, only the most recent (e.g. balance history of 0, 0, 0, 1000 would report the same as 5000, 5000, 5000, 1000, assuming a static credit limit). Although some credit cards report the highest balance you've ever had as the limit, as opposed to the actual limit, so that may explain part of it (e.g. if you have a limit of 10000, but have only ever used 3250 of it, some credit cards would report a "limit" of 3250 and some would report a limit of 10000).

What cards do you have?


No your credit report shows 3 things about this
1) Your limit(which can sometimes be the highest balance ever had)
2) Your current balance
3) Your highest reported balance ever attained.

You know what 1 and 2 is. Highest balance hit is let's say I use $0, $0, $0, $0, $0, $0, $0, $1000, $0, $1500, $5000, $0, $0 $0 on a card with a limit of $10000 and every time I pay the card off in full when the bill is due.

Limit is $10000, current balance is $0, and highest balance hit is $5000. Utilization is still 0%(they don't want that high otherwise you have a different problem). But at one point during a cards entire life cycle if you can have it hit a high balance before you pay it off it actually slightly helps. Apparently in Barclay's case it helps a lot. Churners have no problem with this, but average people out there that use credit sparingly has this minor negative when they apply for credit limits.

High balance lets a bank note that they stand a good chance of getting some nice merchant fees from you even though you likely pay in full every month.

TheDiggler said:   CraftyCraft said:   She said that although I had high credit limits with other lenders and no negative information, I had not demonstrated that I can actually manage a higher credit limit since I never post a balance near any of my limits.If you have the funds available to pay the entire CL of any of your existing CC's, purchase a fully refundable large ticket item on one of your CC's, then wait for the billing cycle to close. Next, PAY THE BILL IN FULL and, at minimum, wait for the payment to POST. Preferably wait for the next billing cycle to CLOSE (i.e. the one in which the large payment was made). Finally, return your fully refundable large ticket item (be sure to do so within its eligible return period!!!) After all of that, you'll end up w/ a LARGE CC PAYMENT posted to your credit report in one month, followed by a large NEGATIVE BALANCE existing on your CC in the following month (where on your credit report, that will likely post as a $0 balance). Once you have a negative balance on your CC, call up the CC issuer and request that they mail you a check for the overpayment amount (to zero out your balance).That seems like a lot of work and won't help people who don't have available funds. Wouldn't it be easier to buy a big ticket item a week before statement close, return it the date of (or day after) statement close, then do it again the following month? At the third cycle date, make sure the card has a $0.00 (or at least an extremely low) balance. The credit report will show a revolving credit card account carrying a large balance for two consecutive cycles that was paid in full during the third cycle. I don't see a need to make payments, get credits, request refund checks, etc. You don't actually need any money to do it the way I described.

HiLine said:   Some lenders do not want to see large balances. Each lender has a way of looking at your application. Barclays doesn't love you, so what? You got a good credit limit with them. Show large balances and you may lose Chase and AMEX's favors.

It's not large balances. It's highest balance attained. There is a huge difference. Essentially what they want to see is $0, $0, $0, $5000, $0, $0, $0 on your other cards(although all they can see on their end is $0 balance, $5000 high balance, and $x limit).

dshibb said:   HiLine said:   Some lenders do not want to see large balances. Each lender has a way of looking at your application. Barclays doesn't love you, so what? You got a good credit limit with them. Show large balances and you may lose Chase and AMEX's favors.

It's not large balances. It's highest balance attained. There is a huge difference. Essentially what they want to see is $0, $0, $0, $5000, $0, $0, $0 on your other cards(although all they can see on their end is $0 balance, $5000 high balance, and $x limit).


It was high balance that I was talking about. Imagine you have 3 cards with 8k, 9k, and 10k limits, and they show 7.8k, 8.8k, and 9.8k high balances respectively. This pattern will imply that you often charge to near the limit, which is an unhealthy habit.

HiLine said:   
It was high balance that I was talking about. Imagine you have 3 cards with 8k, 9k, and 10k limits, and they show 7.8k, 8.8k, and 9.8k high balances respectively. This pattern will imply that you often charge to near the limit, which is an unhealthy habit.


Probably a good idea to avoid bringing them right up to the edge. But $5k high balance on a $10k card is most definitely a net on net positive.

DTASFAB said:   That seems like a lot of work and won't help people who don't have available funds. Wouldn't it be easier to buy a big ticket item a week before statement close, return it the date of (or day after) statement close, then do it again the following month? At the third cycle date, make sure the card has a $0.00 (or at least an extremely low) balance. The credit report will show a revolving credit card account carrying a large balance for two consecutive cycles that was paid in full during the third cycle. I don't see a need to make payments, get credits, request refund checks, etc. You don't actually need any money to do it the way I described.That's an excellent idea, provided CC REFUNDS show up as CC PAYMENTS on one's credit report.

To make sure I understand your suggestion correctly, it's this:

Month 1: Purchase LARGE TICKET ITEM a week before billing cycle 1 closes, CC balance: FULL
Month 2: Shortly after billing cycle 1 closes, return LARGE TICKET ITEM, CC balance: $0
Month 2: Re-purchase LARGE TICKET ITEM a week before billing cycle 2 closes, CC balance: FULL
Month 3: Shortly after billing cycle 2 closes, return LARGE TICKET ITEM, CC balance: $0
<rinse/repeat process for as many months as you want>

CraftyCraft said:   TheDiggler, I've read stores of CC companies scoffing at this practice and closing accounts upon issuing checks for a negative balance. Are there any lenders you would suggest to avoid? I remember Chase coming up many times in my searches.Like anything w/ CC's, if you abuse it, you might lose it. If you do it sparingly, it's unlikely to adversely affect you. The other suggestion, however, where you don't have to front any of your own $$$, is better.

TheDiggler said:   DTASFAB said:   That seems like a lot of work and won't help people who don't have available funds. Wouldn't it be easier to buy a big ticket item a week before statement close, return it the date of (or day after) statement close, then do it again the following month? At the third cycle date, make sure the card has a $0.00 (or at least an extremely low) balance. The credit report will show a revolving credit card account carrying a large balance for two consecutive cycles that was paid in full during the third cycle. I don't see a need to make payments, get credits, request refund checks, etc. You don't actually need any money to do it the way I described.That's an excellent idea, provided CC REFUNDS show up as CC PAYMENTS on one's credit report.

To make sure I understand your suggestion correctly, it's this:

Month 1: Purchase LARGE TICKET ITEM a week before billing cycle 1 closes, CC balance: FULL
Month 2: Shortly after billing cycle 1 closes, return LARGE TICKET ITEM, CC balance: $0
Month 2: Re-purchase LARGE TICKET ITEM a week before billing cycle 2 closes, CC balance: FULL
Month 3: Shortly after billing cycle 2 closes, return LARGE TICKET ITEM, CC balance: $0
<rinse/repeat process for as many months as you want>


1) There is a difference between billing cycle and reporting cycle. Billing cycle is when you have to pay your balance. Reporting cycle is when your bank updates the CRAs. These are often not aligned with each other. That means that let's say you're Billing cycle starts on the 1st and the reporting cycle is on the 15th(you don't know what this date is). That would mean that every time you pulled your credit it would show a balance equal to 15 days of transactions even though you're paying in full each month. That is why if you truly want to be at 0% utilization(actually 1% is superior to 0%) going into lets say a mortgage you have to stop using the credit cards altogether for about a little over a month just to be sure that your regular spending doesn't show up.
2) What you're describing would have interest charges every month. That is an unnecessary expense for no value, and given what I described in #1 there is a good chance that it wouldn't even work.
3) What would possibly be the reason why you would want to do this over and over again. The only goal is to get it to report a high balance once and then never again.

The strategy of using a big ticket purchase would probably work best by just buying that big ticket item immediately after your billing cycle started and then returning it at the immediate end of your billing cycle. The overwhelming odds are that it'll report somewhere in between those dates and you don't even have to incur an interest charge for carrying it after the due date nor would you have to return it afterward and cause a giant negative balance. See? Simple!

I am trying to think of a "big ticket purchase" that would be easily refundable four this purpose... I have not come up with many ideas just yet. Perhaps I am not as creative as some of y'all. The first thought that came to mind was a travel booking of some sort that offered a 100% cancellation refund, but I am not sure where to begin.

What would you recommend for an easily refundable big ticket purchase? Refundable international first-class airfare?

An expensive TV with a 30 day return policy? A refundable airline ticket? An expensive piece of jewelry from a store that has a 30 day return policy?

dshibb said:   TheDiggler said:   DTASFAB said:   That seems like a lot of work and won't help people who don't have available funds. Wouldn't it be easier to buy a big ticket item a week before statement close, return it the date of (or day after) statement close, then do it again the following month? At the third cycle date, make sure the card has a $0.00 (or at least an extremely low) balance. The credit report will show a revolving credit card account carrying a large balance for two consecutive cycles that was paid in full during the third cycle. I don't see a need to make payments, get credits, request refund checks, etc. You don't actually need any money to do it the way I described.That's an excellent idea, provided CC REFUNDS show up as CC PAYMENTS on one's credit report.

To make sure I understand your suggestion correctly, it's this:

Month 1: Purchase LARGE TICKET ITEM a week before billing cycle 1 closes, CC balance: FULL
Month 2: Shortly after billing cycle 1 closes, return LARGE TICKET ITEM, CC balance: $0
Month 2: Re-purchase LARGE TICKET ITEM a week before billing cycle 2 closes, CC balance: FULL
Month 3: Shortly after billing cycle 2 closes, return LARGE TICKET ITEM, CC balance: $0
<rinse/repeat process for as many months as you want>


1) There is a difference between billing cycle and reporting cycle. Billing cycle is when you have to pay your balance. Reporting cycle is when your bank updates the CRAs. These are often not aligned with each other. That means that let's say you're Billing cycle starts on the 1st and the reporting cycle is on the 15th(you don't know what this date is). That would mean that every time you pulled your credit it would show a balance equal to 15 days of transactions even though you're paying in full each month. That is why if you truly want to be at 0% utilization(actually 1% is superior to 0%) going into lets say a mortgage you have to stop using the credit cards altogether for about a little over a month just to be sure that your regular spending doesn't show up.
2) What you're describing would have interest charges every month. That is an unnecessary expense for no value, and given what I described in #1 there is a good chance that it wouldn't even work.
3) What would possibly be the reason why you would want to do this over and over again. The only goal is to get it to report a high balance once and then never again.

2) There should be no interest charges posted, assuming you've been paying the statement balance in full every cycle. New purchases have a grace period. Returning a purchase within the grace period is the same as making a payment in that amount. 100% of the credit cards I've had since I got my first card in 1998 have worked this way. You still have to pay for other purchases (non-returned items) in full. For example, my Chase Ink billing date is the 10th of every month. Hypothetically, on June 10, my statement closes with a balance of $750 and 3000 available ultimate rewards points. On June 11 I buy a $1000 computer. On June 12 I redeem 3000 rewards points for a $30 statement credit. On June 20 I make a $700 payment. On June 26 I return a $20 item that I had purchased on June 5, and the $20 credit posts on June 29, well in advance of my July 3 due date. The $1000 computer charge on June 11 has a grace period even though my payment of $700 was less than my statement balance of $750. No interest will be charged as long as I pay the July 10 balance in full by the due date of August 3. Statement credits do not count towards making the MINIMUM payment, but they have ALWAYS counted, in my experience, towards making a full payment. Yeah, this results in a loophole that credit card issuers don't want you to know about, since it allows you to make a purchase and an immediate return that will count towards making a full payment. If you try this, you should do it at a merchant where you made a purchase during the recently closed billing period. The subsequent purchase should be for less than the initial purchase. Then the return should be a partial return. Think about it for a while. Unless the card issuer pulls the return receipt, they won't know which item(s) you returned. They will give you the benefit of the doubt and assume you returned item(s) purchased as part of the initial transaction that took place before the statement closed.

1 & 3) This strategy has more than one application. For instance, my Capital One No Hassle Cash Rewards card frequently offers access checks that are treated exactly the same as purchases, except they don't earn rewards. With a $20K limit, I like to drop $19,500 into an interest bearing account the day after my statement closes in a given month. I get approximately 47 days of float each time I do this. It also guarantees the high balance will be reported, regardless of what date it gets reported each month, since I'm carrying that balance for over six consecutive weeks.

dshibb said:   An expensive TV with a 30 day return policy? A refundable airline ticket? An expensive piece of jewelry from a store that has a 30 day return policy?I'd go with jewelry. It's small, easy to carry, easy to hide discreetly, and it's not electronic, meaning there's no non-refundable activation fee and no piece of software that can't be returned after being opened. It's also hard to damage, unless you're REALLY stoopid, in which case you shouldn't be messing around with credit cards in this fashion.

HiLine said:   What would you recommend for an easily refundable big ticket purchase? Refundable international first-class airfare?Gambling losses up to 100k

I have multiple limits above 10,000 and 5,000 and always have $0 balances on all but one card. I have never had an analyst question why I want more credit since I am not using it. Barclays is just really odd with their approvals and such.

Just to add to the above, I've noticed all of my cards update the credit agencies within a week of my statement close date and report the balance as of the statement date (citi, wells fargo, discover, chase, barclay, usaa). I'm not positive this will report the high balance the same way, but for me if I were trying to accomplish this I would pay in full by my due date, then after the payment clears but before my statement cuts I'd go out and buy a large TV (WalMart or costco) or refundable first class tickets to get the balance up, then refresh with usaa credit monitor or credit karma daily, and return the item once the statement updates. This will also report a high utilization % for this billing period, so I'd only do 1 or 2 cards at a time and only when I don't plan to apply for more credit before the next statement date.

CraftyCraft said:   
This is a good point. I am really not interested in keeping this card beyond one year (The Barclaycard Arrival card). I am interested in picking up the SallieMae MasterCard issued by Barclaycard in a few months and would like to have a decent limit on it. Has anyone applied for that card? Experiences?


I'm not really sure what the purpose a high limit on the Sallie Mae Mastercard would serve. The gas is capped at $250/month, the groceries at $250 a month and the Amazon at $750 a month. With the 10% bonus for deposits into Upromise and a linked HYS its 5.5% on those, which is really nice for low spending, but high limit and thus high potential spend in those categories isn't going to do anything for you. Beyond those categories its a 1% card with a 10% bonus or 1.1%, which is higher than some cards, but is lower than the Fidelity AMEX, the Capital One Cash Rewards(when you factor in the 50% year end bonus) and a couple other cards that are just as easy to get.

As for the card itself, I just got one, Barclaycard gave me a 10k limit, which is way more than I need for a card with a 1250/monthly cap in the categories its useful for(gas, groceries, Amazon.) My income is ~60k and my other credit limits at the time of app totaled about 25k. Credit score right around 750.

Barclays is the one bank me or my wife have never been approved on. 800+ score w/ low 6 figure income... Go figure. Does calling their recon. line actally work??

vickh said:   Barclays is the one bank me or my wife have never been approved on. 800+ score w/ low 6 figure income... Go figure. Does calling their recon. line actally work??

They dislike inquiries and new accounts. Are you a sign-up bonus chaser?

HiLine said:   vickh said:   Barclays is the one bank me or my wife have never been approved on. 800+ score w/ low 6 figure income... Go figure. Does calling their recon. line actally work??

They dislike inquiries and new accounts. Are you a sign-up bonus chaser?


Guilty (like most of us on FWF).... Would calling their recon. line still work??

Shaudius said:   CraftyCraft said:   
This is a good point. I am really not interested in keeping this card beyond one year (The Barclaycard Arrival card). I am interested in picking up the SallieMae MasterCard issued by Barclaycard in a few months and would like to have a decent limit on it. Has anyone applied for that card? Experiences?


I'm not really sure what the purpose a high limit on the Sallie Mae Mastercard would serve. The gas is capped at $250/month, the groceries at $250 a month and the Amazon at $750 a month. With the 10% bonus for deposits into Upromise and a linked HYS its 5.5% on those, which is really nice for low spending, but high limit and thus high potential spend in those categories isn't going to do anything for you. Beyond those categories its a 1% card with a 10% bonus or 1.1%, which is higher than some cards, but is lower than the Fidelity AMEX, the Capital One Cash Rewards(when you factor in the 50% year end bonus) and a couple other cards that are just as easy to get.

As for the card itself, I just got one, Barclaycard gave me a 10k limit, which is way more than I need for a card with a 1250/monthly cap in the categories its useful for(gas, groceries, Amazon.) My income is ~60k and my other credit limits at the time of app totaled about 25k. Credit score right around 750.


I appreciate you sharing your experience with the card. I did not realize the card had such low monthly caps on the gas/grocery category. The gas cap isn't a huge deal; I spend around that monthly anyway. But the grocery cap is a bit disappointing. Too bad it's not possible to purchase grocery store gift cards on Amazon.

vickh said:   HiLine said:   vickh said:   Barclays is the one bank me or my wife have never been approved on. 800+ score w/ low 6 figure income... Go figure. Does calling their recon. line actally work??

They dislike inquiries and new accounts. Are you a sign-up bonus chaser?


Guilty (like most of us on FWF).... Would calling their recon. line still work??


If your credit history is at least a few years, give it a try. If you have a thin file, don't even bother.

CraftyCraft said:   
]What cards do you have?
Chase Freedom: $7k CL
Chase Slate: $2k CL (converted from an old Chase student card, my first card)
AMEX Blue Cash: $5k CL
Edward Jones World (Elan): $10k CL
Discover More: $2750 CL

s.

Here's your answer . Your limits are small and the primary thing a credit analyst looks at are your other limits . Some issuers are more generous , some more stingy .

But if all your lines are this small , you're not going to get a large line.
If all your lines were $20k+ you'd have much better chance getting a large line

At least you all have a shot at Barclay's. For the 3.1 million of us that live in Iowa, we're SOL.

I have cards with limit 50k, 35k, .. all over 10k. Credit scores closed to 800. But Barclay only give me 2k credit line.

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Horseymen said:   You need to find lenders that will let you combine credit limits.

Here's how I did it:

I got a card with Navy - they maxed me at 10k. I got a 2nd card with Navy 6 months later, and got another 10k. I asked if I could combine cards and close the 2nd card. Sure. Now I have a 20k card. I ask for a CLI and get 25k. I apply with Navy to get a 3rd card. Get 25k. Again, combine cards and close one of them. Now I have a 50k card.

Now everyone looks at my credit report and goes.. hot damn, he has a 50k card! So I apply for a Penfed card, and get a 40k card.

Now I apply for Chase, and they see I have a 40k Penfed card and a 50k Navy card, and they give me a 30k card..

SIS is right - they like to see higher limits. Start consolidating your cards to show 1 or 2 high limit cards.


This is excellent! I'll do some research on which lenders still allow reallocation of credit lines. Thanks for the information.



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