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Mcringring said:   
nwill002 said:   and whats wrong with a ham sandwich? get fresh cut meat from the deli counter at your grocery store and you can have a high quality sandwich that wont cost much more than the over-processed prepackaged stuff.
Hate to break it to you, but the ham at the deli counter is over-processed prepackaged stuff.

  That's exactly what I thought I wanted to say something like, "Hmmmm. You're aware that the meat doesn't come off the pig salted and soft enough to cut with a spoon, right?"

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Paying attention to good nutrition and exercise.

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Go meatless twice a week.

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ChefJoe said:   stompoutloud said:   Hey guys.  I read this entire thread.  Thanks for sharing the tips.  Here is my tip....

google the 52 week savings challenge.  I have done it already and it's my second year doing it.  I have two accounts this year. Last year, it helped my family pay for a 4 day vacation and also paid a few annual bills.  (tag renewels, license renewels, ect).  This year, we will use one account to help pay for bills and one for fun/vacation/gifts. 

  FWIW, the "challenge" is to create an account specifically for this savings and deposit $(n+1) dollars in it where n is the number of the week in your challenge.  1, 2, 3, 4, 5 ... 52 .   In the end, you end up with $1,378 in the account.


I just deposited $1,378 into my savings account today. Do i win?

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Usorry said:   Go meatless twice a week.
Except on those days I bring in leftovers, I rarely have days when I'm completely meatless, but I keep meat out of my grocery shopping. It's very easy to not choose meat at the grocery store when I'm not hungry

It's not as easy when it's lunch time and I'm at a sandwich counter deciding between a watercress sandwich and the roast beef

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orangecrushv said:   
ChefJoe said:   
stompoutloud said:   Hey guys.  I read this entire thread.  Thanks for sharing the tips.  Here is my tip....

google the 52 week savings challenge.  I have done it already and it's my second year doing it.  I have two accounts this year. Last year, it helped my family pay for a 4 day vacation and also paid a few annual bills.  (tag renewels, license renewels, ect).  This year, we will use one account to help pay for bills and one for fun/vacation/gifts. 

  FWIW, the "challenge" is to create an account specifically for this savings and deposit $(n+1) dollars in it where n is the number of the week in your challenge.  1, 2, 3, 4, 5 ... 52 .   In the end, you end up with $1,378 in the account.


I just deposited $1,378 into my savings account today. Do i win?

  Maybe you can do it by day instead of by week. And if you truly can deposit $66,795 into your savings account today, then yes, you do win

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I'd tell people to buy JCPenney stock

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Install solar panels on the roof of your house

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smurfy said:   Install solar panels on the roof of your house
  Hardly simple, and the savings are nowhere near as good as making efficiency improvements like better insulation, sealing ducts, turning the thermostat to a more reasonable temperature etc.

<--Has solar panels on roof

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+1 to that. I'd have to pay a 6% hurricane deductible every 5 years as those panels got blown off in a storm. No thanks.

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jagec said:   
smurfy said:   Install solar panels on the roof of your house
  Hardly simple, and the savings are nowhere near as good as making efficiency improvements like better insulation, sealing ducts, turning the thermostat to a more reasonable temperature etc.

<--Has solar panels on roof

  Yup. What is it that they say; the cheapest kilowatt of energy is the one you don't use?

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Usorry said:   Go meatless ....
  

Thanks what she said...  

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Work overtime instead of reading FW. Invest the proceeds

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buy appetite suppressants.

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Stop ordering drinks (soda, beer, whatever) when you eat out.

Let's say ~$4/drink for family of 3 ($12/meal), eating out ~3 times a week = $36/week = $1,872/year (which doesn't even include tax and tip)

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drink beer instead of eating

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ach1199 said:   Use Google and Y0utube to perform routine maintenance on your car. Recently used Y0utube vids to replace couple of sensors on my car that easily saved me $300+. Same thing for home repairs/maintenance.
 Why only use for cars.

I use Google and Youtube to fix my freezer frost problem (replaced heater element) and my washing machine problem where your washing machine is not draining correctly (Secret drain plug under washing machine lower front panel which was not in manual.  If you can for service, they will charge you few hundred bucks to come out and open the panel and unscrew the panel and plug to clear the clog).

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kantscholar said:   
JacksonX said:   
cestmoi123 said:   
jmw11 said:   No student loans with a few exceptions (eg. engineering majors, top-25 MBA/law program, medical/dental/pharmacy school, any other major with excellent job prospects and salary). NO law school, history majors, economics majors, business administration majors, etc.

Doing it by major is silly. Someone with a philosophy degree from Harvard is far better equipped to get a well-paying job than someone with an engineering degree from a tier 3 school.


I don't buy it.
Employers want skills. Taking classes in "witches, warlocks, and ouija boards" likely doesn't help in that department.
What does the average Harvard philosophy major do upon graduation? Probably not financial analyst.

A chem E, EE, CE, etc coming from your average state school likely has huge job prospects, higher starting salary, and far less debt than the Harvard philosophy major ( if not the Harvard engineer.)



Philosophy major here. I was offered a low/mid 6-figure job at a hedge fund when I completed my PhD (in philosophy). I turned it down for a mid 5-figure job in academia.

I know FWF is all about the money, but life isn't just about money. One of the great problems with our country, and one that is bankrupting this nation, is the idea that everyone needs to go to college. The vast majority of kids going to college are going for vocational training. It's absurd. There are suckers born every minute, and that schools can charge 200k to teach kids accounting or business management proves that statement to be true.

Don't get me wrong--there are some jobs that require advanced, theoretical training. But most don't. We'd be much better off if we thought of college like going to the theater, something that you do because you enjoy it and it is intellectually rewarding, rather than as a good financial move.

So perhaps my contribution to this thread is: One simple change is to consider whether or not you're actually better off spending big bucks to go to college, or if you'll be just as successful (if not more successful) taking an apprenticeship position out of high school and becoming a skilled tradesman. (And this is coming from a college philosophy professor.)

  
you're right in that you say life is about more than money- with that said paying tens of thousands if not 100k plus to get a degree that is worthless financially makes no sense, when you can learn the same things in a topic that interests you for next to nothing.

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Adjust your withholding to get more of your money now instead of loaning it to the government interest-free.

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If you are young and in good health, get a high deductible health plan. I know plenty of people in their 20's wasting 100's on health insurance they never use and probably won't for years.

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crazytexan said:   If you are young and in good health, get a high deductible health plan. I know plenty of people in their 20's wasting 100's on health insurance they never use and probably won't for years.
  
This can work for some people, but I'm glad I didn't have a high deductible health plan when, over the summer, my gallbladder had to be removed. $500 co-pay for a $20,000 surgery that surely would have cost more if I didn't have an excellent health care plan.

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imperium said:   
crazytexan said:   If you are young and in good health, get a high deductible health plan. I know plenty of people in their 20's wasting 100's on health insurance they never use and probably won't for years.
  
This can work for some people, but I'm glad I didn't have a high deductible health plan when, over the summer, my gallbladder had to be removed. $500 co-pay for a $20,000 surgery that surely would have cost more if I didn't have an excellent health care plan.

  Umm, as someone who had one of those plans when he was young...  my understanding was that under such a circumstance I may have had a $2,000 payment or whatever but after that it would be covered by the insurance.  Yes, when I didn't have any ongoing medication or reason to visit the hospital, it worked out fine for me (who had no major injuries).   I think your example imperium may be proving the point.

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chunkalunk said:   Stop ordering drinks (soda, beer, whatever) when you eat out.

Let's say ~$4/drink for family of 3 ($12/meal), eating out ~3 times a week = $36/week = $1,872/year (which doesn't even include tax and tip)

  Stop eating out.

rated:
ChefJoe said:   
imperium said:   
crazytexan said:   If you are young and in good health, get a high deductible health plan. I know plenty of people in their 20's wasting 100's on health insurance they never use and probably won't for years.
  
This can work for some people, but I'm glad I didn't have a high deductible health plan when, over the summer, my gallbladder had to be removed. $500 co-pay for a $20,000 surgery that surely would have cost more if I didn't have an excellent health care plan.

  Umm, as someone who had one of those plans when he was young...  my understanding was that under such a circumstance I may have had a $2,000 payment or whatever but after that it would be covered by the insurance.  Yes, when I didn't have any ongoing medication or reason to visit the hospital, it worked out fine for me (who had no major injuries).   I think your example imperium may be proving the point.

  
If you go the high deductible route, the "wise" thing to do is deposit the difference/amount saved in a high yield, liquid savings account. If anything should go wrong, you will have the money to cover the higher deductible. Otherwise, you just continue adding the difference to your savings account to build a build a healthy emergency fund and/or transfer anything in excess of your deductible into whatever other retirement planning or investing you do that does not qualify for tax free benefits. If I understood this 20 years ago, I'd be a lot better off financially than I am now.

rated:
save until it hurts. and then save a little more than that.

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Could we have a summary of these?
 

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chunkalunk said:   Stop ordering drinks (soda, beer, whatever) when you eat out.

Let's say ~$4/drink for family of 3 ($12/meal), eating out ~3 times a week = $36/week = $1,872/year (which doesn't even include tax and tip)

  
If you're a family of 3 eating out 3 times a week, you've get larger problems than the cost of drinks.

rated:
HKSturboKid said:   
ach1199 said:   Use Google and Y0utube to perform routine maintenance on your car. Recently used Y0utube vids to replace couple of sensors on my car that easily saved me $300+. Same thing for home repairs/maintenance.
 Why only use for cars.

I use Google and Youtube to fix my freezer frost problem (replaced heater element) and my washing machine problem where your washing machine is not draining correctly (Secret drain plug under washing machine lower front panel which was not in manual.  If you can for service, they will charge you few hundred bucks to come out and open the panel and unscrew the panel and plug to clear the clog).

  umm

rated:
chunkalunk said:   Stop ordering drinks (soda, beer, whatever) when you eat out.

Let's say ~$4/drink for family of 3 ($12/meal), eating out ~3 times a week = $36/week = $1,872/year (which doesn't even include tax and tip)

  When eating out with SO, order one soda (free refills) and one water. 

Bonus points: do it on a first date.

rated:
jagec said:   
smurfy said:   Install solar panels on the roof of your house
  Hardly simple, and the savings are nowhere near as good as making efficiency improvements like better insulation, sealing ducts, turning the thermostat to a more reasonable temperature etc.

<--Has solar panels on roof

  This depends on where you live - if you live in the Midwest, insulating your home is better bang for the buck; if you live in the desert, then solar panels (some out there offer lease-like options which is attractive) help significantly with your energy usage.

I just did some math on this. Adding insulation to improve the energy efficiency of my unheated garage and caulking windows will cost $800 but save $160 per year in energy savings...or 5 year ROI. Adding solar panels, even super efficient ones, will not offer similar ROI for me in the cold Midwest. But if you live in AZ, these numbers would be flipped.

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Read Bogleheads, set up a simple three-fund portfolio of index funds, re-balance once a year, and don't let a financial adviser take 1% of your money every year.

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Are men cheaper?

rated:
So many ways I can read that sentence.

rated:
bxlefty23 said:   
kantscholar said:   
JacksonX said:   
cestmoi123 said:   
jmw11 said:   No student loans with a few exceptions (eg. engineering majors, top-25 MBA/law program, medical/dental/pharmacy school, any other major with excellent job prospects and salary). NO law school, history majors, economics majors, business administration majors, etc.

Doing it by major is silly. Someone with a philosophy degree from Harvard is far better equipped to get a well-paying job than someone with an engineering degree from a tier 3 school.


I don't buy it.
Employers want skills. Taking classes in "witches, warlocks, and ouija boards" likely doesn't help in that department.
What does the average Harvard philosophy major do upon graduation? Probably not financial analyst.

A chem E, EE, CE, etc coming from your average state school likely has huge job prospects, higher starting salary, and far less debt than the Harvard philosophy major ( if not the Harvard engineer.)



Philosophy major here. I was offered a low/mid 6-figure job at a hedge fund when I completed my PhD (in philosophy). I turned it down for a mid 5-figure job in academia.

I know FWF is all about the money, but life isn't just about money. One of the great problems with our country, and one that is bankrupting this nation, is the idea that everyone needs to go to college. The vast majority of kids going to college are going for vocational training. It's absurd. There are suckers born every minute, and that schools can charge 200k to teach kids accounting or business management proves that statement to be true.

Don't get me wrong--there are some jobs that require advanced, theoretical training. But most don't. We'd be much better off if we thought of college like going to the theater, something that you do because you enjoy it and it is intellectually rewarding, rather than as a good financial move.

So perhaps my contribution to this thread is: One simple change is to consider whether or not you're actually better off spending big bucks to go to college, or if you'll be just as successful (if not more successful) taking an apprenticeship position out of high school and becoming a skilled tradesman. (And this is coming from a college philosophy professor.)

  
you're right in that you say life is about more than money- with that said paying tens of thousands if not 100k plus to get a degree that is worthless financially makes no sense, when you can learn the same things in a topic that interests you for next to nothing.

  
Reading a bunch of books will not allow you to learn the same things as what you're going to get by engaging in these discussions on college campuses with faculty members who have been thinking about these ideas for a long time, especially when you're learning via the Socratic method. I think all of the humanities are like this. But, again, for me it wouldn't be about the degree. It's about the experience. Do you want to pay 100k to study philosophy and have meaningful philosophical conversations for 4 years? Sounds like a great idea if you have the money, time, and interest. Now, would I go into serious debt to do that? No. But there are probably very few degrees that are worth going into serious debt for if you look at it just in terms of financial return.

Edit: Thanks for reading my reply carefully enough to get the point.  But, yeah, that was an interesting typo.

rated:
now/not, what a world of difference one word makes.

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Venturion said:   now/not, what a world of difference one word makes.
So true!

That was the core of one of the legendary stories in a company where I used to work.  A project manager got reassigned from Project A to Project B. Project A's customer was very upset and wrote a letter to the CEO essentially demanding that the PM (let's call him John Smith) be put back on his multi-million dollar Project A. The CEO wrote a reply, pointing out how important the customer was to the company and how the CEO wanted the customer to be happy... and closed with:

"So to illustrate how much we value your company's business, I want to inform you that John Smith will not be reassigned to your project."

The CEO was baffled when the customer then called him and screamed bloody murder. It was apparently an entertaining conversation until the CEO realized what the letter actually said.  He intended to write "...will now be reassigned..."

rated:
US1549 said:   Bag lunch to work. Cost of a ham sandwich $2 VS. going out of $5-7
  

Ramen Cup noodles x 2 - $1.

rated:
madcowdisease said:   
chunkalunk said:   Stop ordering drinks (soda, beer, whatever) when you eat out.

Let's say ~$4/drink for family of 3 ($12/meal), eating out ~3 times a week = $36/week = $1,872/year (which doesn't even include tax and tip)

  Stop eating out.

 
Seriously. Just feed your family ham sandwiches.

rated:
TheParrot said:   
madcowdisease said:   
chunkalunk said:   Stop ordering drinks (soda, beer, whatever) when you eat out.

Let's say ~$4/drink for family of 3 ($12/meal), eating out ~3 times a week = $36/week = $1,872/year (which doesn't even include tax and tip)

  Stop eating out.

 
Seriously. Just feed your family ham sandwiches.

  But, someone that got green above said to pay attention to good nutrition. This means FWF gives contradictory advice and that I can't just do whatever someone on this forum tells me to do....must...not...let...head...explode...

rated:
obrian100 said:   
brettdoyle said:   Wear condoms

Swallow to save money on condoms and to increase protein in-take............

  
Why buy condoms when you can j**k **f for free?

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