• 1 2 34518
  • Page
  • Text Only
dbl118 said:   

I try and be friendly with my cashiers wherever possible, and look harmless. I rarely do Walgreens, but of the few times I've been there, their employees are often the most squirrely. I think their policy is less lax than some of the other places, and they are more on the alert for suspicious behavior.

??


+1... Least coupon friendly and their managers are the worst, compared to CVS...

sackland87 said:   Glitch99 said:   
As I've told numerous store managers - "whatever will make you comfortable with my activity". If it takes a police detective clearing me, so be it. Goes hand in hand with voluntarily respecting whatever limits each manager wants to impose, regardless of company policy.


At least you had the opportunity to speak with the managers. Thats the thing that bothers me the most I think. Not a single word was said to me. Just wait till I leave then call the cops. Punk move IMO.


Perhaps they were scared you had a gun? Perhaps a cashier needed to talk to a manager? Perhaps they realized that the purchase itself was totally legit, but they were worried about a pattern that was representing a larger illegal activity? Perhaps they wanted to consult with the police as far as what to do in the future?

Who knows. Having a police officer question you is not something you can sue over. You know that. Everybody with a brain here knows that. What happened was the price of doing business...nothing more. If I walked around town with a see through gun shaped object in my pocket I would expect to be questioned more and viewed more dangerously, and if a police officer wanted to see what the object was, I wouldn't have a right to sue.

fattywallace said:   Glitch99 said:   

A person can be detained without being charged. Just not indefinitely. Give your response, and that's exactly what happens.


Or talk to the cops, put your foot in the mouth and be jailed w/o any mercy. Cops look as heroes and you, well, talking to Bubba.

Glitch99 said:   Then one $5k legal bill later, you are sitting in the same position that OP got to for free, only for you the cops are still wondering what you were hiding while OP has a new friendly contact in the department should he ever need it.

You can't be that naive?


You really can't be that naive? Not worth the risk of losing clearance AND job just because you don't have to cooperate.

sackland87 said:   Glitch99 said:   
As I've told numerous store managers - "whatever will make you comfortable with my activity". If it takes a police detective clearing me, so be it. Goes hand in hand with voluntarily respecting whatever limits each manager wants to impose, regardless of company policy.


At least you had the opportunity to speak with the managers. Thats the thing that bothers me the most I think. Not a single word was said to me. Just wait till I leave then call the cops. Punk move IMO.

My "experience" with the detective also involved being blindsided. The next day when talking to a couple of the employees (the manager wasnt in), I mentioned it would've been nice if they'd just asked.

But in the managers shoes, I can also understand the silence when suspicious - your store is already on the hook for thousands in potential chargebacks, and if you tip the guy off that you are on to him, he's going to disappear leaving you to eat the unrecoverable loss (not to mention the risk of an "aggressive" reaction). It kind of sucks from our perspective, but it is what it is.

fattywallace said:   Glitch99 said:   
Walgreens has no way to verify that a license is legit. Matching credit card name with ID only weeds out the random bums who find a credit card on the street. If, as I previously speculated, they knew he was visiting multiple stores, it shows a level of organization beyond a petty theif. Besides, most people here crying foul over this situation would also bitch about a store requiring ID at all "in violation of their merchant agreement with Visa" or some other technicality.


So what are they, at store that sells merchandise or a crew of Hawaii 5-0 looking for an alleged crime?

Part of the store manager's job is to protect the store from loss; should the store take a hit, given the dollar amount in play he'd get fired for having looked the other way. He could very well have been acting on instructions from the store's loss prevention department, too.

Okay... So we obviously have opinions here from both sides of the fence. I cant go back and not talk to the police. Nor do I want to pick a fight with them. Whats done is done. What I think I will do from here is continue with the complaint to the corporate office and file one with the BBB. Thank you everyone for your opinions.

Also, if there is any other place worth filing a complaint, let me know.

sackland87 said:   Okay... So we obviously have opinions here from both sides of the fence. I cant go back and not talk to the police. Whats done is done. What I think I will do from here is continue with the complaint to the corporate office and file one with the BBB. Thank you everyone for your opinions.

Also, if there is any other place worth filing a complaint, let me know.

Unless your promotion is over and you are giving up on the games, I wouldn't want to draw any more attention to myself than there has already been... Your incident won't prompt corporate change, but the complaint will be added to a list that will eventually prompt policy changes (in other words, if there are enough problems they'll stop selling gift card using credit)....

Glitch99 said:   sackland87 said:   Okay... So we obviously have opinions here from both sides of the fence. I cant go back and not talk to the police. Whats done is done. What I think I will do from here is continue with the complaint to the corporate office and file one with the BBB. Thank you everyone for your opinions.

Also, if there is any other place worth filing a complaint, let me know.

Unless your promotion is over and you are giving up on the games, I wouldn't want to draw any more attention to myself than there has already been... Your incident won't prompt corporate change, but the complaint will be added to a list that will eventually prompt policy changes (in other words, if there are enough problems they'll stop selling gift card using credit)....


It's really not an issue of how the card was purchased. Whether I was buying with credit or debit, they probably would have still called the cops.

Who knows. Having a police officer question you is not something you can sue over. You know that.
It absolutely is something you can sue over. It has been done and done successfully. Have you not read about the whole stop and frisk fiasco in NYC???

Everybody with a brain here knows that. What happened was the price of doing business...nothing more.

Maybe for you.

If I walked around town with a see through gun shaped object in my pocket I would expect to be questioned more and viewed more dangerously, and if a police officer wanted to see what the object was, I wouldn't have a right to sue.
Florida v JL, come on man. You absolutely would have a right to sue. I walk around with a loaded gun on my hip and if a cop so much as stopped me while I was walking we'd be in court. It's been done before, and the cops have lost repeatedly.
http://www.opposingviews.com/i/society/guns/video-ohio-man-illeg...
http://www.examiner.com/article/alamogordo-police-pay-21-000-to-...

sackland87 said:    What I fail to see though, is how I was suspicious enough for Walgreens to call the police in the first place. Of the 5 stores I go to, I frequent that one the least. I stayed under their store limit. I used a CC that was in my name and they also checked it with my ID.
In case you missed it - cashiers from different stores know each other, and even talk about work. Store managers know each other, even across chains. Here, I happened to find out that two managers from two different chains are married to each other. This whole thing probably triggered when someone figured out you were running all over town buying up these things, not any one visit to one particular store.

sackland87 said:   Glitch99 said:   sackland87 said:   Okay... So we obviously have opinions here from both sides of the fence. I cant go back and not talk to the police. Whats done is done. What I think I will do from here is continue with the complaint to the corporate office and file one with the BBB. Thank you everyone for your opinions.

Also, if there is any other place worth filing a complaint, let me know.

Unless your promotion is over and you are giving up on the games, I wouldn't want to draw any more attention to myself than there has already been... Your incident won't prompt corporate change, but the complaint will be added to a list that will eventually prompt policy changes (in other words, if there are enough problems they'll stop selling gift card using credit)....


It's really not an issue of how the card was purchased. Whether I was buying with credit or debit, they probably would have still called the cops.

Just saying - don't cause unintended consequences....

Glitch99 said:   This whole thing probably triggered when someone figured out you were running all over town buying up these things, not any one visit to one particular store.

Probably. Still not right though IMO. I stayed within their set limits, never argued, and paid with a CC in my name.

codename47 said:   42 USC 1983.lol... I have litigated 1983 cases in Federal court (and am about to file another). People get pulled over mistakenly every single day in this country... and 99% of those stops are absolutely legally privileged. Even if it was a non-privileged stop, what would the damages be? $5? I've had people sit in jail wrongfully for days and had the judges and mediators essentially laugh at the client and tell them to go take their nuisance value settlement... after they had spent 5x that on attorney's fees.

Having opposed several Motions for Summary Judgment on this very issue... I am amused but unsurprised by your dangerously stupid legal advice.

I've been wrongfully stopped once or twice in my life. Guess what... you man up and move on... not run to court like a crying child with a scraped knee.

IANYL OP

codename47 said:   Who knows. Having a police officer question you is not something you can sue over. You know that.
It absolutely is something you can sue over. It has been done and done successfully. Have you not read about the whole stop and frisk fiasco in NYC???

Everybody with a brain here knows that. What happened was the price of doing business...nothing more.

Maybe for you.

If I walked around town with a see through gun shaped object in my pocket I would expect to be questioned more and viewed more dangerously, and if a police officer wanted to see what the object was, I wouldn't have a right to sue.
Florida v JL, come on man. You absolutely would have a right to sue. I walk around with a loaded gun on my hip and if a cop so much as stopped me while I was walking we'd be in court. It's been done before, and the cops have lost repeatedly.
http://www.opposingviews.com/i/society/guns/video-ohio-man-illeg...
http://www.examiner.com/article/alamogordo-police-pay-21-000-to-...

But carrying a concealed handgun, which is what he said, is illegal without the appropriate permit (yes, local laws do vary somewhat)...

mistake #1, not using your right to remain silent.

Glitch99 said:   codename47 said:   Who knows. Having a police officer question you is not something you can sue over. You know that.
It absolutely is something you can sue over. It has been done and done successfully. Have you not read about the whole stop and frisk fiasco in NYC???

Everybody with a brain here knows that. What happened was the price of doing business...nothing more.

Maybe for you.

If I walked around town with a see through gun shaped object in my pocket I would expect to be questioned more and viewed more dangerously, and if a police officer wanted to see what the object was, I wouldn't have a right to sue.
Florida v JL, come on man. You absolutely would have a right to sue. I walk around with a loaded gun on my hip and if a cop so much as stopped me while I was walking we'd be in court. It's been done before, and the cops have lost repeatedly.
http://www.opposingviews.com/i/society/guns/video-ohio-man-illeg...
http://www.examiner.com/article/alamogordo-police-pay-21-000-to-...

But carrying a concealed handgun, which is what he said, is illegal without the appropriate permit (yes, local laws do vary somewhat)...
Don't both arguing with him, he's insane.

Squeezer99 said:   mistake #1, not using your right to remain silent.Had he not made this "mistake", he'd be out of the gift card game now.

Most people don't know their rights, myself included. Even if you get Miranda rights read to you, you likely don't know the full implications, ESP when the officer says " do you mind".... Your thoughts of innocence, rightfully or wrongfully so, and need to explain may get you in a situation you don't want to be in. Your dealing with professionals in law and your na´vetÚ may find you being taken advantage of , with your permission. Your dealing with the heat of the moment, not an everyday occurance with most.

Honestly I'm glad they're a little proactive given all the reports about gift card fraud and the bluebird problems in ATL mentioned on flyertalk.

To everyone who keeps saying something to the effect of, "just let it go"... I think that can easily be the edge of a slippery slope.

Stand up for YOUR rights because 94% of the world's population will not.

JaxFL said:   Most people don't know their rights, myself included. Even if you get Miranda rights read to you, you likely don't know the full implications, ESP when the officer says " do you mind".... Your thoughts of innocence, rightfully or wrongfully so, and need to explain may get you in a situation you don't want to be in. Your dealing with professionals in law and your na´vetÚ may find you being taken advantage of , with your permission. Your dealing with the heat of the moment, not an everyday occupancy with most.

And that's the reason I opened this up to public forum. While not all advice is sound advice, I can get different viewpoints on the situation because in reality, I wasn't exactly sure how I felt about it.

slappycakes said:   To everyone who keeps saying something to the effect of, "just let it go"... I think that can easily be the edge of a slippery slope.

Stand up for YOUR rights because 94% of the world's population will not.


The other side of the slope is slippery too. Do we want to live in a world where cops can't do their jobs because they will be sued over talking to a suspect? Should we all pay higher taxes because the legal system is clogged up with frivilous cases?

sackland87 said:   JaxFL said:   Most people don't know their rights, myself included. Even if you get Miranda rights read to you, you likely don't know the full implications, ESP when the officer says " do you mind".... Your thoughts of innocence, rightfully or wrongfully so, and need to explain may get you in a situation you don't want to be in. Your dealing with professionals in law and your na´vetÚ may find you being taken advantage of , with your permission. Your dealing with the heat of the moment, not an everyday occupancy with most.

And that's the reason I opened this up to public forum. While not all advice is sound advice, I can get different viewpoints on the situation because in reality, I wasn't exactly sure how I felt about it.


Well now you have some feedback. Though you explained yourself, in the realm of being innocent of any wrongdoing, was it proper and lawful to begin with. Dealing with the wrong public official (e.g. popo, detective) things may have escalated. The implications may be far reaching. There may not be a right or wrong answer at the end of the day, though I believe in codename... responses, though I likely wouldn't fight the fight. More important not get get to that point to begin with though choice may not be yours.

sackland87 said:   Okay... So we obviously have opinions here from both sides of the fence. I cant go back and not talk to the police. Nor do I want to pick a fight with them. Whats done is done. What I think I will do from here is continue with the complaint to the corporate office and file one with the BBB. Thank you everyone for your opinions.

Also, if there is any other place worth filing a complaint, let me know.


Why?

With your job I would be tread carefully while proceeding.

jason745 said:   sackland87 said:   Okay... So we obviously have opinions here from both sides of the fence. I cant go back and not talk to the police. Nor do I want to pick a fight with them. Whats done is done. What I think I will do from here is continue with the complaint to the corporate office and file one with the BBB. Thank you everyone for your opinions.

Also, if there is any other place worth filing a complaint, let me know.


Why?

With your job I would be tread carefully while proceeding.


That I disagree with. I shouldn't be fearful for my job when I have done nothing wrong. I have nothing at all to hide, I feel I was wronged and was treated like a criminal. I want Walgreens to acknowledge this.

codename47 said:   Who knows. Having a police officer question you is not something you can sue over. You know that.
It absolutely is something you can sue over. It has been done and done successfully. Have you not read about the whole stop and frisk fiasco in NYC???


The OP was subjected to a Terry stop. All that's required for a Terry stop is reasonable suspicion. People sue over Terry stops when they believe them to be racially or otherwise unlawfully motivated such that the suspicion wasn't reasonable. That's the issue with stop and frisk, not the policy itself, the policy itself is completely consistent with Terry, the issue with stop and frisk is that it may be unlawfully targeting blacks. There is some push back on Terry itself, which may be part of the backlash against stop and frisk, but on its face stop and frisk is constitutional as it currently stands(it may not be constitutional the way its carried out though.)


Crazytree said:   codename47 said:   42 USC 1983.lol... I have litigated 1983 cases in Federal court (and am about to file another). People get pulled over mistakenly every single day in this country... and 99% of those stops are absolutely legally privileged. Even if it was a non-privileged stop, what would the damages be? $5? I've had people sit in jail wrongfully for days and had the judges and mediators essentially laugh at the client and tell them to go take their nuisance value settlement... after they had spent 5x that on attorney's fees.

Having opposed several Motions for Summary Judgment on this very issue... I am amused but unsurprised by your dangerously stupid legal advice.

I've been wrongfully stopped once or twice in my life. Guess what... you man up and move on... not run to court like a crying child with a scraped knee.

IANYL OP


Wish I could give this so much green. Glitch's posts too.

I really don't understand who would want to antagonize the police in this situation. There are certainly instances where it's worth asserting your rights (even when you are innocent), but this just seems like looking a gift horse (CashBack churning) in the mouth.

buying gift cards worth $1500 at stores where the normal sales per each transactions at less than $30 is abnormal.

Of course it is a suspicious activity. You made it even worse by complaining about this to higher office NEXT TIME YOU WALK IN THERE, DON'T BE SURPRISED TO BE TOLD CASH ONLY !

This is how people go over the top abusing perks and kill the the deal in the end for everyone..

Forget about you being right when the whole thing you do is suspicious activity for them.

You should have just walked out.

Write a letter of commendation and congratulations to Walgreens for reporting unusual and possibly suspicious activities of customers. Also, a letter to the police commending them for acting promptly to check out a possible problem and resolving it quickly.

sherap2 said:   buying gift cards worth $1500 at stores where the normal sales per each transactions at less than $30 is abnormal.

Of course it is a suspicious activity. You made it even worse by complaining about this to higher office NEXT TIME YOU WALK IN THERE, DON'T BE SURPRISED TO BE TOLD CASH ONLY !

This is how people go over the top abusing perks and kill the the deal in the end for everyone..

Forget about you being right when the whole thing you do is suspicious activity for them.

You should have just walked out.


If you read my post, I did walk out, with a gift card and no issues.

Also, if they go cash only and i pay with $1500 cash, that wont be suspicious?

sackland87 said:   sherap2 said:   buying gift cards worth $1500 at stores where the normal sales per each transactions at less than $30 is abnormal.

Of course it is a suspicious activity. You made it even worse by complaining about this to higher office NEXT TIME YOU WALK IN THERE, DON'T BE SURPRISED TO BE TOLD CASH ONLY !

This is how people go over the top abusing perks and kill the the deal in the end for everyone..

Forget about you being right when the whole thing you do is suspicious activity for them.

You should have just walked out.


If you read my post, I did walk out, with a gift card and no issues.

Also, if they go cash only and i pay with $1500 cash, that wont be suspicious?

there is a limit and there is a way to do it.
Walk out means NOT TO BUY 3K WORTH OF GIFT CARDS FROM STORES WITH CREDIT CARDS WHERE NORMAL TRANSACTION IS $30 OR LESS..
Do you know why many Walgreens don't accept credit cards for gift cards?
$3k of gift cards bought with credit card at Walgreens is a suspicious activity for them and they were right in calling cops to investigate.
You should have just realized where you are going over board and shut up. INSTEAD YOU MADE IT WORSE BY COMPLAINING.
Walk out also means not be greedy with perk abuse.

You are like that child screaming in joy when you get a chocolate and crying like a wolf when you are not happy.

grow up bro, grow up

codename47 said:   Was pulling into Rite Aid #2 and was pulled over. Turns out Walgreens called the police on me for suspicious activity. The police officer questioned me about why I was stopping at all the drug stores and why I was buying so many GCs. I was honest with him and he checked my CC that I used with my ID to make sure they matched. After everything checked out, he was puzzled on why I was stopped in the first place, but said he had to keep me until the detective arrived to talk to me. When the detective arrived (with the K9 unit as well), he explained all the bad things GCs can be used for (which I already knew) and that is why I was stopped. He said he had called the Secret Service to confirm my identity and that everything checked out. After about 30 minutes of being questioned, I was on my way and told I can continue doing what I do, as it is not illegal.

I would be drafting a 42 USC 1983 lawsuit right now for violations of the 4th and 14th amendments. What exactly were you pulled over for? Buying a GC is not suspicious activity, nor is it criminal. They had no reason at all to pull you over, much less question you. Even if there were something suspicious, they had no reason at all to further detain you after the CC and ID were verified. At all. The detective's statement about stopping you because gift cards can be used for bad things is not PC or RAS.

I would immediately call the department involved, request whatever paperwork you need to file a formal complaint, and request all reports on the incident, audio and video of the incident if available, and all documents on the officers personnel files. I did this in a case I am pursuing now, and found out that the officer who pulled me over was an admitted drug user, never pulled anyone over for a DUI or had any interactions with anyone that was drunk (impeaches the "in my experience..."argument they may try to make saying they suspected I was a drunk driver", and the department has hired admitted drug dealers. Really great stuff pre-discovery. Actually, you probably want to request all the info first, get it in hand, then file the formal complaint.

Again, this pins them down to a story on what happened. I found all sorts of interesting stuff. The cop said he pulled me over for driving without my headlights on during the stop, but the police chief stated that I was pulled over for driving slowly on a busy highway, and the cop said in his response to my official complaint that he pulled me over because I swerved and crossed the median line. Asking them the same questions in a deposition under oath should be interesting..."were you lying then or are you lying now... officer, can you explain why the police chief disagreed with the reason you stated for why you pulled me over...Chief, can you explain how you determined the road was busy when no cars passed in either direction for 8 minutes..."

I wish I could be nice about this, but you are stupid for talking to the cops. Doubly stupid if you have a clearance and a job to lose. Go to flexyourrights.org and find out why or just watch this video. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i8z7NC5sgik or this https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eCVa-bmEHuQ or this https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2I_Btei6vKs

Is there anything I can do legally?
Yup, sue them. 42 USC 1983.

I'm not one to go around suing everyone,

Then don't complain and BOHICA. Sue them or sit back and enjoy getting your rights violated.

I have never even spoken to a lawyer (except to buy my house).

It may be helpful with a lawyer, but you really don't need one.

I feel very violated and embarrassed by the situation.
Apparently not that embarrassed or violated. I think you probably liked it, otherwise you would be ready and willing to sue them. Your definition of violated and embarrassed may differ from mine, but in the times that I have been harassed by cops, I was F'ing pissed.


A little background on myself. I have never been in trouble with the law. I am a military veteran and a current federal employee. I hold a secret clearance and get drug tested randomly.Had anything happened with the police, I could have been in jeopardy of losing my clearance, and therefore losing my job.
Again, these are things that that you don't value or really care about if you are willing to take this from the cops. You don't value your job, you don't value your security clearance. I would never, ever let this pass. As a veteran, you should be triply pissed because these guys are pissing on the grave of every person who died securing the country. I didn't stare down North Koreans on the DMZ to come back here and be harassed for buying a gift card.


This. Exactly this.

If your dog pisses on your carpet, you rub his face in it and he learns not to piss on the carpet. Cops who piss on your rights learn the same way.

sherap2 said:   
there is a limit and there is a way to do it.
Walk out means NOT TO BUY 3K WORTH OF GIFT CARDS FROM STORES WITH CREDIT CARDS WHERE NORMAL TRANSACTION IS $30 OR LESS..
Do you know why many Walgreens don't accept credit cards for gift cards?
$3k of gift cards bought with credit card at Walgreens is a suspicious activity for them and they were right in calling cops to investigate.
You should have just realized where you are going over board and shut up. INSTEAD YOU MADE IT WORSE BY COMPLAINING.
Walk out also means not be greedy with perk abuse.

You are like that child screaming in joy when you get a chocolate and crying like a wolf when you are not happy.

grow up bro, grow up


Ok bro

BTW the caps really help get your point across. You should keep that up.

Data points needed. How many runs a billing cycle. Which TYP card?

rismoney said:   Data points needed. How many runs a billing cycle. Which TYP card?

I dont see how those data points would be relevant.

Never knew there was a law against buying a lot of gift cards.
I would of asked them what's the charge and left it at that.

sackland87 said:   jason745 said:   sackland87 said:   Okay... So we obviously have opinions here from both sides of the fence. I cant go back and not talk to the police. Nor do I want to pick a fight with them. Whats done is done. What I think I will do from here is continue with the complaint to the corporate office and file one with the BBB. Thank you everyone for your opinions.

Also, if there is any other place worth filing a complaint, let me know.


Why?

With your job I would be tread carefully while proceeding.


That I disagree with. I shouldn't be fearful for my job when I have done nothing wrong. I have nothing at all to hide, I feel I was wronged and was treated like a criminal. I want Walgreens to acknowledge this.


Then what? Something like this would really make you feel better?

IMG

Lol that would do...

I wouldn't give the cops a hard time... they are doing their job (following up on a report, no matter how legit). I would focus on Walgreens. Go to the media. I'm sure everyone would like to know cashiers are not only paying close attention to what you are buying, but ready to report you for anything "they" feel is suspicious.

Wait for Walgreens corporate to call. Negotiate. Settle.



Disclaimer: By providing links to other sites, FatWallet.com does not guarantee, approve or endorse the information or products available at these sites, nor does a link indicate any association with or endorsement by the linked site to FatWallet.com.

Thanks for visiting FatWallet.com. Join for free to remove this ad.

TRUSTe online privacy certification

While FatWallet makes every effort to post correct information, offers are subject to change without notice.
Some exclusions may apply based upon merchant policies.
© 1999-2014