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lol... I have litigated 1983 cases in Federal court (and am about to file another). People get pulled over mistakenly every single day in this country... and 99% of those stops are absolutely legally privileged. Even if it was a non-privileged stop, what would the damages be? $5? I've had people sit in jail wrongfully for days and had the judges and mediators essentially laugh at the client and tell them to go take their nuisance value settlement... after they had spent 5x that on attorney's fees.Having opposed several Motions for Summary Judgment on this very issue... I am amused but unsurprised by your dangerously stupid legal advice.I've been wrongfully stopped once or twice in my life. Guess what... you man up and move on... not run to court like a crying child with a scraped knee.Don't both arguing with him, he's insane.

Yeah, and I've litigated a few myself. This wasn't a mistake. They pulled him over for engaging in perfectly legal activities. Damages are whatever are determined at trial, and if you want to spend $100,000 or more to defend a $5 lawsuit, go right ahead. Get a couple of those thrown at you, and the police chief will probably say hey guys, you know what...the next time you get a call for someone buying something at Walgreens, if there isn't a murder involved, let it go.

Funny how I never paid 5x in attorneys fees, of course I never engaged the services of a lawyer for this, as they were all worthless. Maybe because I've been stopped more than once or twice in my life improperly I'm a bit more sensitive about the issue than you are...or maybe because people like me swore an oath to defend the constitution.

The other side of the slope is slippery too. Do we want to live in a world where cops can't do their jobs because they will be sued over talking to a suspect? Should we all pay higher taxes because the legal system is clogged up with frivilous cases?
The other side is called freedom. I would love to live in that world, as we are so much closer to a 1984 police state that we are to that if you haven't been reading the news lately. People should not be afraid of their governments. Governments should be afraid of their people.

mistycoupon said:   Never knew there was a law against buying a lot of gift cards.
I would of asked them what's the charge and left it at that.


Well, you wonder why the cop would have just said that to Walgreen's manager and told him to set his store policies to prevent OP from buying more.

Interesting that the cop was able to find him at another Pharmacy...The managers must have been talking that this same guy is showing up 5 times a month right after hitting the Walgreens. Probably the same progression of his drive.

mistycoupon said:   

Interesting that the cop was able to find him at another Pharmacy...The managers must have been talking that this same guy is showing up 5 times a month right after hitting the Walgreens.


He didn't find me at another pharmacy. He pulled behind me and followed me for about a half mile. Turned his lights on when I pulled into the parking lot. He even said he just happened to see me when they called my description over the radio

OK, I guess the moral of the story is watch your rearview mirrors to see if you are being followed as well as look to the sky for drones

sackland87 said:   I am a Citi TYP card holder and have been churning GCs since I got it. My normal "run" is 4 drug stores and one grocery store. I usually walk away with about 7K in GCs each run. This past Thursday however, went very different. Here is the series of events.

#1: Stopped at the grocery store. Picked up $1500 in GCs.

#2: Stopped at Walgreens and bought one $500 PayPal MyCash card.

#3: Stopped at Rite Aid and bought one $500 Vanilla Visa.

#4: Was pulling into Rite Aid #2 and was pulled over. Turns out Walgreens called the police on me for suspicious activity. The police officer questioned me about why I was stopping at all the drug stores and why I was buying so many GCs. I was honest with him and he checked my CC that I used with my ID to make sure they matched. After everything checked out, he was puzzled on why I was stopped in the first place, but said he had to keep me until the detective arrived to talk to me. When the detective arrived (with the K9 unit as well), he explained all the bad things GCs can be used for (which I already knew) and that is why I was stopped. He said he had called the Secret Service to confirm my identity and that everything checked out. After about 30 minutes of being questioned, I was on my way and told I can continue doing what I do, as it is not illegal.

I visit this particular Walgreens about 5 times a month and buy about $3000 in gift cards a month from there. Why wouldn't they say anything to me in person? Why do they make a store limit on gift cards if they are going to call the police even if you stay under the limit?

I have already called Walgreens and filed a complaint with their corporate office. They said I would hear back from them on Monday or Tuesday. Is there anything I can do legally? I'm not one to go around suing everyone, I have never even spoken to a lawyer (except to buy my house). I feel very violated and embarrassed by the situation. I was pulled over on one of the main streets in the city and everyone passing by could see me being questioned by a uniformed police officer, detective, and the K9 unit. I wanted to go back to the Walgreens and confront the manager(to talk, not cause a scene), but I was advised by many people that that wouldn't be a good idea.

A little background on myself. I have never been in trouble with the law. I am a military veteran and a current federal employee. I hold a secret clearance and get drug tested randomly.

Had anything happened with the police, I could have been in jeopardy of losing my clearance, and therefore losing my job.

Any advice would be appreciated.


I am an older vet than you I suspect as I am covered by the Vietnam Era Veterans Readjustment Act.

First you don't go into Walgreens wearing your Federal ID with the Security Clearance. So what you see is what you get. Two your activities fit the profile for money laundering for the Operation Synergy to a T. If you don't know it merchants have been alerted to this particular pattern and told to report transactions of this nature. My only current appointment is someone caught up on the gift card side of this dragnet. http://thesmokesignal.com/operation-synergy-dea-raids-in-35-stat... You happened to do this on the same day as when the Feds were doing a take down in 35 states. Wonder why you were thought to be suspicious?

Third I hope you are reporting and paying taxes on your Cash Back from churning. Read this article from the Journal of Accountancy on when it is and is not taxable. http://www.journalofaccountancy.com/Issues/2008/Oct/Tax_Treatmen... As it stands the only reported case on point that is reported and stands as legal precedent is United Draperies (41 TC 457, affd 15 AFTR2d 50.1 (7th Cir. 1964)),

" The Tax Court said the kickbacks were not exclusions because the payments were for the referral service provided and were independent of the price agreement between the seller and buyer. On appeal, the Seventh Circuit agreed and pointed out that the seller had a claim of right to the entire sales price."

Note you will not find this in the regular F2d as it is an older Tax Case before the consolidation and CCH not West Publishing has copyright. If you pay Walgreen's the full price you have to pay the income taxes; if Walgreen's gives you the discount at the register no income taxes. Really simple rule. IRS has ignored the problem until recently, but with the new audit instructions for fraud http://www.treasury.gov/tigta/auditreports/2013reports/201330020... this is very unlikely to continue to be ignored.

I held a nuke clearance as an ordinance officer and later spent 25 years active practice in Federal Court and 12 years on a part time basis for the Federal Public Defender's Office after retirement. So I know clearances. You are setting your self up to get your clearance revoked if you haven't paid taxes on what you churned. CHURNING IS TAXABLE and that was settled in 1964. I would avoid filing the 1983 claim as that will call attention to you. The District Clerks Office reports all suits involving Federal employees.

I wouldn't bring any more attention to this at Walgreens as you are likely just getting yourself permabanned from buying gc or even formally trespassed from their stores. Then the cops can arrest you if you ever set foot in them again

Argyll said:   Write a letter of commendation and congratulations to Walgreens for reporting unusual and possibly suspicious activities of customers. Also, a letter to the police commending them for acting promptly to check out a possible problem and resolving it quickly.

I think this is close to the smart reaction, but I would not contact Walgreens corporate. If you call attention to activity that seems to expose them to risk or even diminished profit, you risk having them react in a way that will eliminate your churning. It wouldn't be too hard to do in a way that would leave 99% of their gift card sales unaffected.

But I would definitely follow up in person with the staff at Walgreens - the cashier that day and ideally the manager at the time. "Hey, I don't know if you got any followup from the police, but they did talk to me. Everything's fine, and I'm sorry if I had you guys nervous about anything." I'd probably even explain exactly why this weird activity makes you money. This should at the least put you on pretty friendly terms with these folks. It's possible they'll raise the scenario with superiors, but you've already gotten their attention. Do not give them any grief, no matter how friendly it sounds in your head, like "I would have appreciated if you'd just said something to me". As others have pointed out, you're not seeing this from their POV, that would have been a stupid move on their part. Be a nice guy with no hint of a grudge, and you can make them totally comfortable that you're not doing anything they ever need to worry about.

Separate 'what you want to do' from 'what you want to happen'. The best case outcome is that you get to continue churning, maybe even with some improved limits or just efficiency after they know you.

This lawsuit talk sounds ridiculous. You were not harmed, and any 3rd party is going to completely understand why Walgreens staff thought it looked strange and why the police followed up on the information they got.

IMO, everything worked as it was supposed.

Nothing to worry about.

If your job depends on your security clearance, then let it go. I am not sure why you are buying all these GC unless you are trying to collect points? Don't lose your job over this.

I have a friend who works at Walgreens. They receive training to watch for and report gift card transactions that are "suspicious." Suspicious would be transactions right below their limits, especially multiple transactions or other behaviors consistent with money laundering. I'd imagine there are similar policies at other stores.

I'm not saying it's "right," just that this is standard policy and it's probably nothing personal directed towards the OP by the Walgreens staff. Could be they have a newer cashier at the store who just received training on this policy so it's still fresh in their head making them more likely to notice.

TheDealMaker said:   If your job depends on your security clearance, then let it go. I am not sure why you are buying all these GC unless you are trying to collect points? Don't lose your job over this.
That's exactly why he is buying them , for the 5x thankYou points

i do not understand why you r buying all these cards and what do you do with them?

I'll chime in since a similar situation happened recently, and without too many details.

A card churner came in with a bazillion little gift cards and wanted to consolidate them onto larger cards. Unknown to some staff its not something we do. I saw the transaction taking place as it was frustrating the cashier and there was crap piled everywhere. I stopped the transactions and contacted both the police and corporate office. Contrary to my frequent agreement with Codename47, this absolutely is suspicious activity. Its absolutely the type of activity we see with credit card theft, and new to me from the police was the potential significance in money laundering. The detective told me they are actually tracking gift card/cash card purchases now due to the large volume of fraud associated with it. Don't expect a merchant to potentially eat $1000's in loss because churning on the surface looks just like fraud, and is so close to fraud that its against service terms on most CC. A loss like that could easily cost a manager their job as well.

As far as the OP goes, nice job just being calm and forthright about it. You're lucky they didn't contact your CC company and risk you losing your accounts. I would go back to the store, introduce yourself to the manager, and explain what it is you're doing. I know whenever I get large gift card purchases I ask questions of the buyer and it usually starts with 'oh what's the occasion' and occasionally ends up with 'ahh are you churning card benefits?'. There have been plenty of times where flaky and vague responses have resulted in us catching people with stolen IDs and cards.

Didn't read all posts, but I hope OP realizes he is being a party pooper by calling corporate. And seriously, what did OP lose besides half hour of his time?

Mailman said:   I have a friend who works at Walgreens. They receive training to watch for and report gift card transactions that are "suspicious." Suspicious would be transactions right below their limits, especially multiple transactions or other behaviors consistent with money laundering. I'd imagine there are similar policies at other stores.
When their limit is "1", how do you get a transaction right below their limit?

CptSavAHo said:   I would go back to the store, introduce yourself to the manager, and explain what it is you're doing.

Please don't do that.

unnamedone said:   CptSavAHo said:   I would go back to the store, introduce yourself to the manager, and explain what it is you're doing.

Please don't do that.

There's no harm in explaining "I'm just taking advantage of a temporary spending promotion on my card". Much better than just letting their imaginations run wild.

Now holding a 3-hour seminar with the manager to explain all the in's and out's would be different.

dev77 said:   i do not understand why you r buying all these cards and what do you do with them?
Funny. Your user ID was created in 2003, but you've apparently never been on FWF before.

Sue Walgreens! It is the same thing as as a clerk accusing you of shop lifting when you were not. A store better be very sure before it accuses you of an illegal activity. See a lawyer! Every thing seems pretty benign until it happens to you!

Glitch99 said:   unnamedone said:   CptSavAHo said:   I would go back to the store, introduce yourself to the manager, and explain what it is you're doing.

Please don't do that.

There's no harm in explaining "I'm just taking advantage of a temporary spending promotion on my card". Much better than just letting their imaginations run wild.


Emphasis on temporary if folks start running to store managers, corporate offices, etc about such promotions.

Glitch99 said:   codename47 said:   
Again, they don't need to know my side of the story other than "I don't consent to any searches, I'd like a lawyer, I don't wish to make any statements or be interrogated, and I would like to be free to go and will now exercise my right to be silent."


My guess is all that a trip to the station would just up the cost of a civil lawsuit to about $40-50k. They can't just take you downtown to make you talk. Then you have to get into the actual charging of someone with a crime, which is what exactly?

A person can be detained without being charged. Just not indefinitely. Give your response, and that's exactly what happens. Then one $5k legal bill later, you are sitting in the same position that OP got to for free, only for you the cops are still wondering what you were hiding while OP has a new friendly contact in the department should he ever need it.


The PO job is not to be your friend. It is very foolish to offer anything to them, innocent or not. I doubt very much that they stopped investigating him, more likely it is just the beginning. The sheriff Andy Taylor days are over.

Saying anything besides "I like to earn points/miles on my credit card" is volunteering too much . Never explain the churn and that you earn a cash profit otherwise a cop who takes his job too seriously will report you to IrS investigators

And they won't be so understanding

corporateclaw said:   sackland87 said:   

If I am diabetic and buy hypodermic needles from Walgreens, are they going to call the cops because I might be a heroin addict?


Yes. People are dumb. I bet you could go to a diabetes forum and find plenty of people with that same horror story.


That's why I get my Enbrel syringes through mail order. So the store doesn't suspect that I'm an Enbrel addict.

SUCKISSTAPLES said:   Saying anything besides "I like to earn points/miles on my credit card" is volunteering too much . Never explain the churn and that you earn a cash profit otherwise a cop who takes his job too seriously will report you to IrS investigators

And they won't be so understanding


Perhaps you also answered the question of whether to pursue this further or not.

Perhaps I did

sackland87 said:   I am a Citi TYP card holder and have been churning GCs since I got it. My normal "run" is 4 drug stores and one grocery store. I usually walk away with about 7K in GCs each run. This past Thursday however, went very different. Here is the series of events.

#1: Stopped at the grocery store. Picked up $1500 in GCs.

#2: Stopped at Walgreens and bought one $500 PayPal MyCash card.

#3: Stopped at Rite Aid and bought one $500 Vanilla Visa.

#4: Was pulling into Rite Aid #2 and was pulled over. Turns out Walgreens called the police on me for suspicious activity. The police officer questioned me about why I was stopping at all the drug stores and why I was buying so many GCs. I was honest with him and he checked my CC that I used with my ID to make sure they matched. After everything checked out, he was puzzled on why I was stopped in the first place, but said he had to keep me until the detective arrived to talk to me. When the detective arrived (with the K9 unit as well), he explained all the bad things GCs can be used for (which I already knew) and that is why I was stopped. He said he had called the Secret Service to confirm my identity and that everything checked out. After about 30 minutes of being questioned, I was on my way and told I can continue doing what I do, as it is not illegal.

I visit this particular Walgreens about 5 times a month and buy about $3000 in gift cards a month from there. Why wouldn't they say anything to me in person? Why do they make a store limit on gift cards if they are going to call the police even if you stay under the limit?

I have already called Walgreens and filed a complaint with their corporate office. They said I would hear back from them on Monday or Tuesday. Is there anything I can do legally? I'm not one to go around suing everyone, I have never even spoken to a lawyer (except to buy my house). I feel very violated and embarrassed by the situation. I was pulled over on one of the main streets in the city and everyone passing by could see me being questioned by a uniformed police officer, detective, and the K9 unit. I wanted to go back to the Walgreens and confront the manager(to talk, not cause a scene), but I was advised by many people that that wouldn't be a good idea.

A little background on myself. I have never been in trouble with the law. I am a military veteran and a current federal employee. I hold a secret clearance and get drug tested randomly.

Had anything happened with the police, I could have been in jeopardy of losing my clearance, and therefore losing my job.

Any advice would be appreciated.



For those of us that are uninformed, why are you buying thousands of $$$$. Of gift cards?

sackland87 said:   I am a Citi TYP card holder and have been churning GCs since I got it. My normal "run" is 4 drug stores and one grocery store. I usually walk away with about 7K in GCs each run. This past Thursday however, went very different. Here is the series of events.

#1: Stopped at the grocery store. Picked up $1500 in GCs.

#2: Stopped at Walgreens and bought one $500 PayPal MyCash card.

#3: Stopped at Rite Aid and bought one $500 Vanilla Visa.

#4: Was pulling into Rite Aid #2 and was pulled over. Turns out Walgreens called the police on me for suspicious activity. The police officer questioned me about why I was stopping at all the drug stores and why I was buying so many GCs. I was honest with him and he checked my CC that I used with my ID to make sure they matched. After everything checked out, he was puzzled on why I was stopped in the first place, but said he had to keep me until the detective arrived to talk to me. When the detective arrived (with the K9 unit as well), he explained all the bad things GCs can be used for (which I already knew) and that is why I was stopped. He said he had called the Secret Service to confirm my identity and that everything checked out. After about 30 minutes of being questioned, I was on my way and told I can continue doing what I do, as it is not illegal.

I visit this particular Walgreens about 5 times a month and buy about $3000 in gift cards a month from there. Why wouldn't they say anything to me in person? Why do they make a store limit on gift cards if they are going to call the police even if you stay under the limit?

I have already called Walgreens and filed a complaint with their corporate office. They said I would hear back from them on Monday or Tuesday. Is there anything I can do legally? I'm not one to go around suing everyone, I have never even spoken to a lawyer (except to buy my house). I feel very violated and embarrassed by the situation. I was pulled over on one of the main streets in the city and everyone passing by could see me being questioned by a uniformed police officer, detective, and the K9 unit. I wanted to go back to the Walgreens and confront the manager(to talk, not cause a scene), but I was advised by many people that that wouldn't be a good idea.

A little background on myself. I have never been in trouble with the law. I am a military veteran and a current federal employee. I hold a secret clearance and get drug tested randomly.

Had anything happened with the police, I could have been in jeopardy of losing my clearance, and therefore losing my job.

Any advice would be appreciated.



For those of us that are uninformed, why are you buying thousands of $$$$. Of gift cards?

nsdp said:   
Third I hope you are reporting and paying taxes on your Cash Back from churning. Read this article from the Journal of Accountancy on when it is and is not taxable. http://www.journalofaccountancy.com/Issues/2008/Oct/Tax_Treatmen...

Thanks, it is not taxable

Sorry this happened to you, OP, I know it's very upsetting.

You sound like a smart guy so I would advice to you consider some of the opposing advices carefully. Can you sue, sure. Can you win AND make it worthwhile AND avoid possible blowback? You can't judge by the amount of green a post get. If you just want to get it out your system, might consider social media. I'm not trying to trivialize what happened, I can absolutely understand how you feel.

In my younger days I was accused of stealing by a store security guard, arrested, and charged for being the wrong color at the wrong place. I sued in small claim after the charge were dropped because a few of the lawyers I talked wouldn't touch it. I lost the small claim too. In the end, I moved on. The only justice in my mind would be to beat the juice out the person's skull but I was and am not willing to take the consequence.

Don't know what you want, but what all I really wanted was a sincere apology. I think you got a case for a apology but not a good case for a lawsuit. Decide what you really want and go for it and not what other Monday morning quarterback want you to do. Wish you the best whatever the case.

kdbrich said:   sackland87 said:   I am a Citi TYP card holder and have been churning GCs since I got it. My normal "run" is 4 drug stores and one grocery store. I usually walk away with about 7K in GCs each run. This past Thursday however, went very different. Here is the series of events.
[...]



For those of us that are uninformed, why are you buying thousands of $$$$. Of gift cards?


Read for context.

Your rights were violated. There is a serious problem when some store clerk becomes a de facto "investigator" for the police. What a crock of BS they gave you, "they can be used for bad things" so can gas can, or 100 other things, so what? At most you were only legally required to show your drivers license because you were driving a car, and not answer any questions, that's what I would have done. Never answer any questions, they were on a fishing expedition. I'd be all over Walgreens corporate (gift cards be damned) & the police dept. This is America, we have rights, laws, etc. The police have no business harassing you and Walgreens has no business reporting you. We have reached a new level of absurdity in this country.

Expressed regret what happened to you, maybe they think you have suspicion of money laundering or some other. However, as long as they knew the line, go its own way, so that all the villains to speak, they are jealous. I wish you have a good mind to look at it. You are a soldier, there is a strong and brave heart.

You can't lay down on this, OP.

First they came for people buying gift cards with gift cards, and I did not speak out--
Because I was not a person buying gift cards with gift cards.

Then they came for people buying U.S. mint coins with credit cards, and I did not speak out--
Because I was not a person buying U.S. mint coins with credit cards.

Then they came for people buying prepaid debit reload cards with credit cards, and I did not speak out--
Because I was not a person buying prepaid debit reload cards with credit cards.

Then they came for me--and there was no one left to speak for me.

bopc1996 said:   Sue Walgreens! It is the same thing as as a clerk accusing you of shop lifting when you were not. A store better be very sure before it accuses you of an illegal activity. See a lawyer! Every thing seems pretty benign until it happens to you!

A clerk accusing someone of shoplifting when they are not is not illegal.

Unless the employees lied about something there is no possible lawsuit here.

It was a highly suspicious transaction and IMO the employees were perfectly valid for calling the cops. Now do I think it was a good idea... Not really... generally these companies put very high thresholds for accusing people of things due to the publicity, but employees violating company policy is generally not illegal nor something you can sue over (yea you can probably sue if they violate the return policy or something similar, but calling the police about suspicious activity... No way).

Anyways... People playing these point games etc. are playing with fire to put it mildly. They tend to look like money laundering similar. You are going to get burned occasionally whether it be a retail employee or a bank flagging the account. Yea the police is unusual, but for this type of activity it is well within the expected possibilities IMO.

You didnt have security clearance to buy that many gift cards..

On a serious note i would sue them they would negotiate a deal before it hit the media

SUCKISSTAPLES said:   Saying anything besides "I like to earn points/miles on my credit card" is volunteering too much . Never explain the churn and that you earn a cash profit otherwise a cop who takes his job too seriously will report you to IrS investigators

And they won't be so understanding


I suppose one could say: "My credit card is offering me bonus rewards for purchases for a limited time, so I am just trying to qualify for those bonus rewards."
Then, decline any further explanation of how the bonus works.

Walgreens filed a false police report. You can't possibly be "money laundering" unless you are the purchasing the gift or debit cards with cash. Drug dealers don't use credit cards unless they are stolen. I would definitely explain this in your complaint to Walgreens corporate HQ. And by the way, your "civil rights" were not denied - that's hogwash.

DCBob said:   Walgreens filed a false police report. You can't possibly be "money laundering" unless you are the purchasing the gift or debit cards with cash. Drug dealers don't use credit cards unless they are stolen. I would definitely explain this in your complaint to Walgreens corporate HQ. And by the way, your "civil rights" were not denied - that's hogwash.

Agreed. I would like someone to explain how to launder money with a CC. As far as I can see, you can't.

OP, unless you've had the full cavity search with a dirty Sanchez thrown in just to finish things off properly, you got of lucky.


And don't ask about the details of my story

kdbrich said:   sackland87 said:   I am a Citi TYP card holder and have been churning GCs since I got it. My normal "run" is 4 drug stores and one grocery store. I usually walk away with about 7K in GCs each run. This past Thursday however, went very different. Here is the series of events.

#1: Stopped at the grocery store. Picked up $1500 in GCs.

#2: Stopped at Walgreens and bought one $500 PayPal MyCash card.

#3: Stopped at Rite Aid and bought one $500 Vanilla Visa.

#4: Was pulling into Rite Aid #2 and was pulled over. Turns out Walgreens called the police on me for suspicious activity. The police officer questioned me about why I was stopping at all the drug stores and why I was buying so many GCs. I was honest with him and he checked my CC that I used with my ID to make sure they matched. After everything checked out, he was puzzled on why I was stopped in the first place, but said he had to keep me until the detective arrived to talk to me. When the detective arrived (with the K9 unit as well), he explained all the bad things GCs can be used for (which I already knew) and that is why I was stopped. He said he had called the Secret Service to confirm my identity and that everything checked out. After about 30 minutes of being questioned, I was on my way and told I can continue doing what I do, as it is not illegal.

I visit this particular Walgreens about 5 times a month and buy about $3000 in gift cards a month from there. Why wouldn't they say anything to me in person? Why do they make a store limit on gift cards if they are going to call the police even if you stay under the limit?

I have already called Walgreens and filed a complaint with their corporate office. They said I would hear back from them on Monday or Tuesday. Is there anything I can do legally? I'm not one to go around suing everyone, I have never even spoken to a lawyer (except to buy my house). I feel very violated and embarrassed by the situation. I was pulled over on one of the main streets in the city and everyone passing by could see me being questioned by a uniformed police officer, detective, and the K9 unit. I wanted to go back to the Walgreens and confront the manager(to talk, not cause a scene), but I was advised by many people that that wouldn't be a good idea.

A little background on myself. I have never been in trouble with the law. I am a military veteran and a current federal employee. I hold a secret clearance and get drug tested randomly.

Had anything happened with the police, I could have been in jeopardy of losing my clearance, and therefore losing my job.

Any advice would be appreciated.



For those of us that are uninformed, why are you buying thousands of $$$$. Of gift cards?


Thanks for reposting the op a couple more times. I thought I was replying to the HGTV free bandana topic.



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