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OK, so this is my first FW post on the finance forum and Im not sure this belongs here, but here goes:

I purchased a home about a year ago that had the in ground Sentricon terminte system installed and was being service by Arrow Exterminators. As far as I know, the original owner paid a lot initially to have them install the system and then paid annually ($350 which is insane) for them to come out and monitor the stations. So, after I moved in, I began receiving invoices from Arrow Extermiantors (AE) for $350 to renew the annual contract and "Termite Warranty." Being an active Fatwalleter (and a devout skeptic), I was leary of the whole Sentricon system (read about all the cons to this system as well as ways exterminators wiggle out of the termite warranties) and felt that $350 was a waste of money. So, I ignored the invoices and decided I would use the stations since they are there and just monitor and service the stations myself (its not rocket science, though I am versed in that as well). I found online companies that sold replacement bait and read through all the literature on Sentricon and similar systems (still skeptical about it working effectiely, but since it was there I might as well use it).
Anyway, to make a long story longer, I came home from work yesterday and saw a plastic bag on my doorknob. Inside the bag was a brochure from Arrow Extermiantors saying they came and removed all of the in ground bait stations since I have not paid for the annual renewal. I was quite PO'ed at this for many reasons.

First, they came onto my property and into my back yard (I do not have a fence) while I was at work WITHOUT my permission. Thats trespassing in my book and if I was home, I wouldnt have let them onto my property.
Second, they removed all the stations and in many cases, left large holes in the ground, disturbed the ground cover, and were sloppy. Now I need to go back and refill holes, re-spread pine straw, etc. I have a few pictures of some of the holes, but its a bit difficult to see in pictures.
Third, what would have happened if my dog was outside and bit them or if they got injured on my property? This seems like a VERY poor practice.
Last, it was my understanding that the bait stations were paid for by the original owner and that the annual fee was for monitoring and re-baiting if necessary. Maybe this is untrue, but it wasnt clearly explained to me by Arrow.

What are my rights and options here? Call and talk to them and get them to reinstall? Take them to small claims court? I cannot leave the holes because I have a dog that could fall into them and it just looks bad. I was planning on calling Arrow today to give them a piece of my mind and ask for compensation/rectification, but I expect them to tell me to go pound sand. I dont really care too much about the stations, but if I did want to use them again, I would be forced to pay a lot to reinstall them - something that was already paid for by the original owner of the house. I appreciate all of your advice.

PS - Property is in GA (1.5 acres) in case it somehow matters

-DJScibbity

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Arrow's giving his everything he wants - along with a non-disclosure document he has to sign (finally a deal he will hav... (more)

Connman (Aug. 31, 2013 @ 12:27p) |

The only reply from OP will be "I was contacted and offered a settlement that we both agreed to and I can't discuss it."... (more)

saladdin (Aug. 31, 2013 @ 5:40p) |

Which translates to:  "I caved and am ashamed to admit it!"  

Mickie3 (Aug. 31, 2013 @ 10:25p) |

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I'd start by getting a copy of the original agreement. It's likely they owned the "equipment".

Small claims

The exterminators may have owned the equipment but, their contract was with the previous owners not you. if they wanted to retrieve their equipment they would have to claim that you were sold stolen property and get the police or court system involved. They can't pull an OJ and steal back their stolen property.

Send them a letter via certified mail requesting the return and reinstallation of the equipment or its value. Let them know that the old owner no longer occupies the property and t was sold to you. If they refuse, sue.

Holy shit, I would be PISSED.

SUPER PISSED.

I'd probably start by calling the cops and getting a police report. WTF ... it's absolutely trespassing and theft. What contract did you sign with these a-holes? None, right? Who in their right mind would think it's ok to meander onto private property and start ripping shit out without a property owner's authorization? Without even prior notification (which would have given you the opportunity to say "please pound sand thank you").

Raise hell dude.

money2011 said:   The exterminators may have owned the equipment but, their contract was with the previous owners not you. if they wanted to retrieve their equipment they would have to claim that you were sold stolen property and get the police or court system involved. They can't pull an OJ and steal back their stolen property.

Send them a letter via certified mail requesting the return and reinstallation of the equipment or its value. Let them know that the old owner no longer occupies the property and t was sold to you. If they refuse, sue.


Hah, "pull an OJ."

I'd pull the other OJ and behead these idiots.

Im trying to obtain a copy of the original agreement, but that is proving to be difficult. The original homeowner did provide a lot of receipts and manual. Ill dig though them later tonight, but Im doubting it is in there. Searching the web for an Arrow Conontract or Terms is not proving to yield much.

And yes Cowbell & money 2011, I agree with yuo. I was "super pissed" last night when I came home to find that on my door!

Ill be looking for the price to install the Sentricon system as to put a value on it in case it comes to small claims court.

Who would I send the certified letter to? Local office or corporate headquarters? To whose attention?
Is it worth calling the local office who likely sent out the crew to install and remove?

I'd call your local police station (look up the non-emergency number) and tell them what happened. Just the basics -

"Somebody came onto my property while I was at work and stole all these devices. There is land damage. Luckily they left evidence of who they are. I don't have any relationship with this company, I own these devices and would like to file a police report and file charges, can you send someone over?"

Imagine if ADT came over while you were at work, picked your lock, and went through your house ripping out door and window sensors, ripping keypads off your wall and leaving holes in drywall. Crime? Yes. Different from your situation? Hell no man, they came on your private property!

Maybe it's all the coffee I just drank but I'm so pissed I'm ready to call the cops for you. If this thread doesn't end with "and that's how I came to own Arrow Exterminators" I won't be satisfied.

Get more pissed, your property was violated. Good luck.

From what I remember, the original homeowner's termite contract transfers to the new owner without charge. Since you're in Georgia, a termite letter might have been required at the time of sale, which Arrow would have provided. I believe the original contract/service agreement states that the homeowner does not own the stations and if the homeowner cancels or fails to pay for renewal, the servicing company (in this case, Arrow) will come to remove their bait systems and send them back to Dow Chemical.

turtlebug said:   From what I remember, the original homeowner's termite contract transfers to the new owner without charge. Since you're in Georgia, a termite letter might have been required at the time of sale, which Arrow would have provided. I believe the original contract/service agreement states that the homeowner does not own the stations and if the homeowner cancels or fails to pay for renewal, the servicing company (in this case, Arrow) will come to remove their bait systems and send them back to Dow Chemical.

This is irrelevant unless the OP agreed to that at the time of sale. Arrow can take it up with the original owner. OP is not a party to that contract.

Trespassing and theft sounds right.

CowbellMaster said:   Imagine if ADT came over while you were at work, picked your lock, and went through your house ripping out door and window sensors, ripping keypads off your wall and leaving holes in drywall. Crime? Yes. Different from your situation? Hell no man, they came on your private property!

While I agree that they're in the wrong, B&E is different from OP's situation (trespassing).

Called Arrow just to find out how much it costs to install the system. Was given a range without seeing the house, but it seems that ~$800 to install would be a close estimate. These guys only come out once per year to check on the stations too. Everything that I read says they should be monitored at least 4 times per year, so they are skimping big time here. What a joke of a company...

Im really wanting to call them and ask why they came onto my property and stole property that is on my land. Is there any harm in doing so? I doubt it will yield much, but Id really like to yell at somebody for this. If it affects future court case though, I will refrain from doing so.

Im doubting the police are going to do much either. Would you REALLY call the police in such a situation? Im thinking the certified letter (and maybe a phone call first) seems like the most reasonable course of action. That will also likely not yield results and will probably end up in small claims court (which could be fun and educational).

Zaos said:   turtlebug said:   From what I remember, the original homeowner's termite contract transfers to the new owner without charge. Since you're in Georgia, a termite letter might have been required at the time of sale, which Arrow would have provided. I believe the original contract/service agreement states that the homeowner does not own the stations and if the homeowner cancels or fails to pay for renewal, the servicing company (in this case, Arrow) will come to remove their bait systems and send them back to Dow Chemical.

This is irrelevant unless the OP agreed to that at the time of sale. Arrow can take it up with the original owner. OP is not a party to that contract.

Trespassing and theft sounds right.


It is relevant, at least from the theft perspective. If I sell you a car, but don't tell you that I've taken out a loan against the car, and you (being unaware of the loan), don't make payments on the loan, the lienholder can repo the car. It wouldn't be stealing it, and your grievance would be with me, not the lienholder.

I would first call them and find out if you were to 'purchase' the system, do you own it, is it rented.. etc. That would help me decide which direction I would go next.

If you would be the owner - Call police as it was stolen.
If it is leased - call the owner of arrow and deal with them unless they are going to be difficult, then I'd go police.

Zaos said:   turtlebug said:   From what I remember, the original homeowner's termite contract transfers to the new owner without charge. Since you're in Georgia, a termite letter might have been required at the time of sale, which Arrow would have provided. I believe the original contract/service agreement states that the homeowner does not own the stations and if the homeowner cancels or fails to pay for renewal, the servicing company (in this case, Arrow) will come to remove their bait systems and send them back to Dow Chemical.

This is irrelevant unless the OP agreed to that at the time of sale. Arrow can take it up with the original owner. OP is not a party to that contract.

Trespassing and theft sounds right.

It is relevant. If the new homeowner did not want to continue a contract with Arrow, he should have called Arrow and had them come remove the Sentricon bait stations. Instead, he began using bait stations he did not own and did not pay for, so Arrow came out to remove them. I do believe, however, that Arrow should have notified OP in advance and made an appointment so that he could have been there to monitor the removal of the Sentricon bait stations. Since OP was not notified, I think he should contact Arrow and demand they pay to remedy the damage left behind.

Personally, I'd start by calling the company and requesting documentation that they owned the system, such as a contract signed by the original owner. At the same time, I'd dig through all closing documentation to see if there's anything about a contract being transferred. If they can't produce any documentation, or it says that you own the equipment, then I'd file a small claims suite against them for the cost of the equipment, installation, and damages to the property.

Jackpot??
http://georgia-court-appeals.vlex.com/vid/arrow-exterminators-in...

The jury returned a verdict as follows: for Mrs. Radtke, $185,000 in compensatory damages and $100,000 in exemplary damages; for Mr. Radtke, $50,000 in compensatory damages and $10,000 in exemplary damages; and for their daughter, Heather, $35,000 in compensatory damages and $20,000 in exemplary damages.
...
We find no merit in any of appellant's enumerations and therefore affirm the judgment in Case No. A90A0230
...
Or maybe not, aside from negligence?
The court directed verdicts for Arrow on the fraud and trespass counts but denied the motion on the issues of breach of contract, breach of warranty, negligence, and punitive damages.

DjScibbity said:   
Im really wanting to call them and ask why they came onto my property and stole property that is on my land. Is there any harm in doing so? I doubt it will yield much, but Id really like to yell at somebody for this. If it affects future court case though, I will refrain from doing so.

No, that will solve nothing.
DjScibbity said:   
Im doubting the police are going to do much either. Would you REALLY call the police in such a situation? Im thinking the certified letter (and maybe a phone call first) seems like the most reasonable course of action. That will also likely not yield results and will probably end up in small claims court (which could be fun and educational).


Absolutely call the police (non emergency number). Exactly as CowbellMaster said. This is theft. The police report will help with a lawsuit should it come to that.

Did the devices have anything on them stating "property of xxxx company"?

cruisencode said:   CowbellMaster said:   Imagine if ADT came over while you were at work, picked your lock, and went through your house ripping out door and window sensors, ripping keypads off your wall and leaving holes in drywall. Crime? Yes. Different from your situation? Hell no man, they came on your private property!

While I agree that they're in the wrong, B&E is different from OP's situation (trespassing).


It might not be trespassing. Depending their contract and the notification that OP receive.

cestmoi123 said:   Zaos said:   turtlebug said:   From what I remember, the original homeowner's termite contract transfers to the new owner without charge. Since you're in Georgia, a termite letter might have been required at the time of sale, which Arrow would have provided. I believe the original contract/service agreement states that the homeowner does not own the stations and if the homeowner cancels or fails to pay for renewal, the servicing company (in this case, Arrow) will come to remove their bait systems and send them back to Dow Chemical.

This is irrelevant unless the OP agreed to that at the time of sale. Arrow can take it up with the original owner. OP is not a party to that contract.

Trespassing and theft sounds right.


It is relevant, at least from the theft perspective. If I sell you a car, but don't tell you that I've taken out a loan against the car, and you (being unaware of the loan), don't make payments on the loan, the lienholder can repo the car. It wouldn't be stealing it, and your grievance would be with me, not the lienholder.


Your analogy makes sense, but isn't it different because of two things? :

A lien against a vehicle/property is different than a service contract.

And when you purchase a home, you get title insurance to protect you from any pre-existing liens/contracts.

Al3xK said:   cestmoi123 said:   Zaos said:   turtlebug said:   From what I remember, the original homeowner's termite contract transfers to the new owner without charge. Since you're in Georgia, a termite letter might have been required at the time of sale, which Arrow would have provided. I believe the original contract/service agreement states that the homeowner does not own the stations and if the homeowner cancels or fails to pay for renewal, the servicing company (in this case, Arrow) will come to remove their bait systems and send them back to Dow Chemical.

This is irrelevant unless the OP agreed to that at the time of sale. Arrow can take it up with the original owner. OP is not a party to that contract.

Trespassing and theft sounds right.


It is relevant, at least from the theft perspective. If I sell you a car, but don't tell you that I've taken out a loan against the car, and you (being unaware of the loan), don't make payments on the loan, the lienholder can repo the car. It wouldn't be stealing it, and your grievance would be with me, not the lienholder.


Your analogy makes sense, but isn't it different because of two things? :

A lien against a vehicle/property is different than a service contract.

And when you purchase a home, you get title insurance to protect you from any pre-existing liens/contracts.

Except the lien would be on the equipment, not the land or improvements.

I'd be careful to claim that you 'own' the equipment that they took, until you figure out if it was provided as part of the service/contract from Arrow.

Also, you had the opportunity to work with Arrow when they attempted to continue the service contract with you. I'm guessing that somewhere in those documents was information explaining that if you didn't renew the contract, they they would come back to collect 'their' equipment.

A simple call is all it would have taken to avoid this. Instead, you decided to continue to use what is likely 'their' equipment. They might even have the right to come after you for your continued use of 'their' equipment without compensating them.

I look at this like a cable box on my property. If I don't want to pay for it, that's one thing, but I don't have the right to mess with the equipment, or use it without compensating the owners.

Buy some topsoil and fill in the holes.

I find it odd that a company can legally come into ones property and remove items within the property without giving proper notification to the homeowner. The legalese is either in the T&C of the contract or in the actual invoices. Better check those invoices....

Connman said:   I'd be careful to claim that you 'own' the equipment that they took, until you figure out if it was provided as part of the service/contract from Arrow.

If it were buried, one might easily assume it to be a 'fixture' when buying the property.
It's entirely possible that Arrow doesn't even know (or care) that the property has changed hands, if nobody contacted them and notified them that their equipment was on OPs property and presumed to be abandoned...

At any rate, if they damage OP's property while retrieving their property...

turtlebug said:   Zaos said:   turtlebug said:   From what I remember, the original homeowner's termite contract transfers to the new owner without charge. Since you're in Georgia, a termite letter might have been required at the time of sale, which Arrow would have provided. I believe the original contract/service agreement states that the homeowner does not own the stations and if the homeowner cancels or fails to pay for renewal, the servicing company (in this case, Arrow) will come to remove their bait systems and send them back to Dow Chemical.

This is irrelevant unless the OP agreed to that at the time of sale. Arrow can take it up with the original owner. OP is not a party to that contract.

Trespassing and theft sounds right.

It is relevant. If the new homeowner did not want to continue a contract with Arrow, he should have called Arrow and had them come remove the Sentricon bait stations. Instead, he began using bait stations he did not own and did not pay for, so Arrow came out to remove them. I do believe, however, that Arrow should have notified OP in advance and made an appointment so that he could have been there to monitor the removal of the Sentricon bait stations. Since OP was not notified, I think he should contact Arrow and demand they pay to remedy the damage left behind.

How are the bait stations any different than a tree in the backyard or the mulch in the flowerbeds? Unless disclosed by the seller, he has no reason to think they stations were not part of the property being purchased. The notices he received from them were regarding monitoring service, not equipment rental. Besides, I'm assuming he's more pissed about the damages done removing the stations than the actual stations.

stanolshefski said:   I'd start by getting a copy of the original agreement. It's likely they owned the "equipment".

Irrelevant. I used to work for a subscription TV service. You signed up for the service, and they put equipment on your premises. When you cancelled, they sent you notices stating that it was your responsibility to return the equipment. They wouldn't be stupid enough to trespass to get it back. If the equipment wasn't returned, they charged you. Arrow is lucky that OP didn't have a vicious dog on the premises - they would have gotten their workmen injured and have a clear workmen's comp case and a lawsuit from them.

Even if the contract does state that they own the equipment, how does that affect the OP? He never signed it. Arrow is perfectly okay in holding the previous homeowner responsible for returning the equipment or having to pay for it, but not OP.

You've got an ironclad admission of guilt, OP. Report to the cops.

We are all still making assumptions.

- Does the last owner paid for the equipment or not.
- OP may have signed document that in effect assumed the contract. And if there's a contract, what remedy is available to the vendor?

- "ignored" the invoices. Never, never, never, a good idea.

Connman said:   
I look at this like a cable box on my property. If I don't want to pay for it, that's one thing, but I don't have the right to mess with the equipment, or use it without compensating the owners.
If the previous owner left the cable box after selling you the house, the cable company will bill the previous owner for the unreturned equipment.

Also being overlooked is the fact that OP bought this house A YEAR AGO and was being contacted about signing up for their monitoring service "soon after moving in". It's not like the sale occured last week and they came to collect the stations as soon as they realized the person who had them installed no longer owned the property, or that a service contract transfered with the sale and has recently expired.

stanolshefski said:   cruisencode said:   CowbellMaster said:   Imagine if ADT came over while you were at work, picked your lock, and went through your house ripping out door and window sensors, ripping keypads off your wall and leaving holes in drywall. Crime? Yes. Different from your situation? Hell no man, they came on your private property!

While I agree that they're in the wrong, B&E is different from OP's situation (trespassing).


It might not be trespassing. Depending their contract and the notification that OP receive.

Someone else's contract cannot grant a third-party access to my property.

stanolshefski said:   Al3xK said:   cestmoi123 said:   Zaos said:   turtlebug said:   From what I remember, the original homeowner's termite contract transfers to the new owner without charge. Since you're in Georgia, a termite letter might have been required at the time of sale, which Arrow would have provided. I believe the original contract/service agreement states that the homeowner does not own the stations and if the homeowner cancels or fails to pay for renewal, the servicing company (in this case, Arrow) will come to remove their bait systems and send them back to Dow Chemical.

This is irrelevant unless the OP agreed to that at the time of sale. Arrow can take it up with the original owner. OP is not a party to that contract.

Trespassing and theft sounds right.


It is relevant, at least from the theft perspective. If I sell you a car, but don't tell you that I've taken out a loan against the car, and you (being unaware of the loan), don't make payments on the loan, the lienholder can repo the car. It wouldn't be stealing it, and your grievance would be with me, not the lienholder.


Your analogy makes sense, but isn't it different because of two things? :

A lien against a vehicle/property is different than a service contract.

And when you purchase a home, you get title insurance to protect you from any pre-existing liens/contracts.

Except the lien would be on the equipment, not the land or improvements.

If buried to the point of causing all this damage to remove them, why wouldnt they be considered improvements?

bravebiffy said:   I find it odd that a company can legally come into ones property and remove items within the property without giving proper notification to the homeowner. The legalese is either in the T&C of the contract or in the actual invoices. Better check those invoices....
He has no contract or invoices. He's never done business with this company. And when being solicited as a new customer, you have no obligation to affirmatively refuse service.

Glitch99 said:   Connman said:   
I look at this like a cable box on my property. If I don't want to pay for it, that's one thing, but I don't have the right to mess with the equipment, or use it without compensating the owners.
If the previous owner left the cable box after selling you the house, the cable company will bill the previous owner for the unreturned equipment.

Also being overlooked is the fact that OP bought this house A YEAR AGO and was being contacted about signing up for their monitoring service "soon after moving in". It's not like the sale occured last week and they came to collect the stations as soon as they realized the person who had them installed no longer owned the property, or that a service contract transfered with the sale and has recently expired.

The delay might have been because the termite letter, which the original homeowner paid for, gave a warranty or guarantee that the property was termite free and/or treated with Sentricon bait systems and Arrow couldn't remove their property when the new homeowner decided not to renew until the warranty/guarantee period was over. I'm just guessing though. It certainly would help to see the original termite letter Arrow provided at the time of sale.

Glitch99 said:   ..


Someone else's contract cannot grant a third-party access to my property.
Unless OP assumed the contract. Power/Gas company can come on to your property and put a lock on the meter, for example.

or,

Would OP equally as pissed if the prior owner paid in advance and the co came out to re-bait the trap?

--- again, one step at a time.

ZenNUTS said:   

- "ignored" the invoices. Never, never, never, a good idea.

Isnt it illegal for a company to bill you for a service prior to entering into a contract with you to provide that service?

turtlebug said:   
The delay might have been because the termite letter, which the original homeowner paid for, gave a warranty or guarantee that the property was termite free and/or treated with Sentricon bait systems and Arrow couldn't remove their property when the new homeowner decided not to renew until the warranty/guarantee period was over. I'm just guessing though. It certainly would help to see the original termite letter Arrow provided at the time of sale.

Any such letter would merely be in respect to the current condition of the property, not potential future damage.

ZenNUTS said:   We are all still making assumptions.

- Does the last owner paid for the equipment or not.


I keep seeing this referenced. Irrelevant to the OP, he purchased the property and everything on it belongs to him, his mortgage issuing bank, and/or the government. Arrow has an issue with the previous owner - they have NO relationship with the OP unless he signed up with them. From what I can gather from the OP, he signed nothing with Arrow.

ZenNUTS said:   
- OP may have signed document that in effect assumed the contract. And if there's a contract, what remedy is available to the vendor?

- "ignored" the invoices. Never, never, never, a good idea.


Who signed the document? Not the OP, unless he's leaving out an extremely obvious, completely relevant fact. I think assuming he signed when he explicitly said he was ignoring invoices is quite the assumption.

I ignore invoices ALL THE TIME. They're from companies that I don't have any relationship with, and are trying to trick people into signing up by issuing what look like legitimate invoices. Tear up and right into the #sand receptacle. May the Good Lord help anyone that thinks by sending me an invoice they are due any kind of obligation from me.

Give me your address so I can send you an invoice for mailbox maintenance. Ignore me and I'll show up. And take your mailbox.

I'm amazed at the number of people telling OP to walk soft-footed. Arrow has a serious conversation to have with the previous owner, not OP. They hold absolutely zero power over OP, and have absolutely zero rights to him, or any of his property. If I was OP I would absolutely call the police and and absolutely file charges. My second call would be to a lawyer, because if some company thinks they can walk all over me, my private property, and my rights, I'm going to fully exercise my rights to demonstrate the gravity of their error.

Glitch99 said:   ZenNUTS said:   

- "ignored" the invoices. Never, never, never, a good idea.

Isnt it illegal for a company to bill you for a service prior to entering into a contract with you to provide that service?
Yes, yes, and yes.

broken record here, did the OP assumed the contract or not.

I already provide some example above, here's another one: I bought a house with a "leased" water heater. Part of the closing document referred to any such contract(s) will be assumed by the buyer. Yes, I read stuff in detail. I made sure the seller paid it off (actually, seller forgot but the escrow co later coughed up the $) so I don't have to worry about.

Zaos said:   turtlebug said:   From what I remember, the original homeowner's termite contract transfers to the new owner without charge. Since you're in Georgia, a termite letter might have been required at the time of sale, which Arrow would have provided. I believe the original contract/service agreement states that the homeowner does not own the stations and if the homeowner cancels or fails to pay for renewal, the servicing company (in this case, Arrow) will come to remove their bait systems and send them back to Dow Chemical.

This is irrelevant unless the OP agreed to that at the time of sale. Arrow can take it up with the original owner. OP is not a party to that contract.

Trespassing and theft sounds right.


Nope. They would fall under the same provisions for a utility to come onto the property and retrieve their equipment, since you choose not to renew.

BTW - if you have a mortgage, it may be that certified termite protection is required and by not renewing, you may be violation of your mortgage agreement. If Arrow reports back to the mortgage lender, you may be assigned a new termite service at the rate the mortgage company bills and they will charge you for it or roll-in into a revised payment.

You might have saved a penny but it could end up costing you a mighty pound.

Skipping 177 Messages...
saladdin said:   
civ2k1 said:   
DjScibbity said:   Well Said SIS,
I have contacted Kevin and am in talks with Arrow currently. Police report was also filed with proper documentation. I appreciate everyone's interest and comments.


Updates, OP?  Don't leave us hanging!

  The only reply from OP will be "I was contacted and offered a settlement that we both agreed to and I can't discuss it."
 

  

Which translates to:  "I caved and am ashamed to admit it!"  

 



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