Doing a LinkedIn Photo shoot?

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Any thoughts on this? Where can this go bad? How should a resume shot look like and cost? I called a local photographer in my town and he said he did it in an outside studio with a white background should take 15-20 minutes for $95. Dress to impress or business casual?

I actually did it based on a well place senior finance alum during a call saying your photo should exude happiness etc vs the current one I have up. Photo is a little smaller on LinkedIN. I haven't really touched my LinkedIn until now (was on private until I did), so I am putting in the work to fix it up after networking in person and having people wanting to follow up.


Oh and in case you can't tell. Young, 20s, and BALD

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That compels an amendment to my list of disadvantages:

  • you may be considered ugly
  • you may be considered to underestima... (more)

bonghead (Aug. 29, 2013 @ 11:50a) |

This is a good point. More and more, these photo-icons are showing up next to e-mail messages, texts, etc., on computers... (more)

zgori (Aug. 29, 2013 @ 2:31p) |

Just suit and tie..no pants needed... Spend that money for the photographer

dontcare4myname (Aug. 29, 2013 @ 8:35p) |

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Probably not worth your time and money.

Pics?

I don't want any potential employers prejudging me ('cause I'm fairly rough on the eyes, and "exuding happiness" is not exactly one of my standout features).

I think it is worth it. You should always try to create a strong online presence. I did two photo-shoots, one for an online dating website, the other for online professional communities.

For the dating site the number of views and solid leads, meaning actual enjoyable dates skyrocketed once I took off the Facebook style "selfies" and posted professional photos. Most people look at the photo and then decide weather or not to read the profile. That was $350 in the NYC area. The photographer used Central Park and midtown as the background and included 3 wardrobe changes and profile editing.

In regards to the professional shoot, many conventions that I attended people knew me before I knew them simply by my photo. It was recent, accurate, and portrayed me in a good light; their words not mine. It helped break the ice and lead to a discussion outside the typical convention bullshit. That was $150 in the NYC area, 2 business attire, one business casual and used indoor studio as well as outdoor scenery.

EDIT: The dating shoot took about 3hrs. The business shoot took about 2hrs. Part of being a good photographer is getting the client to warm up, and truly express himself. 

 

money2011 said:   I think it is worth it. You should always try to create a strong online presence. I did two photo-shoots, one for an online dating website, the other for online professional communities.

For the dating site the number of views and solid leads, meaning actual enjoyable dates skyrocketed once I took off the Facebook style "selfies" and posted professional photos. Most people look at the photo and then decide weather or not to read the profile. That was $350 in the NYC area. The photographer used Central Park and midtown as the background and included 3 wardrobe changes and profile editing.

In regards to the professional shoot, many conventions that I attended people knew me before I knew them simply by my photo. It was recent, accurate, and portrayed me in a good light; their words not mine. It helped break the ice and lead to a discussion outside the typical convention bullshit. That was $150 in the NYC, 2 business attire, one business casual and used indoor studio as well as outdoor scenery.

  I actually asked this photographer about suits and whether I should wear it or he should bring it and he just replied 'bring what image you want to portray' implying he didn't provide those things himself. 

$95 for 15 minutes? I should consider becoming a photographer!

itzcuzimuslim said:   
money2011 said:   I think it is worth it. You should always try to create a strong online presence. I did two photo-shoots, one for an online dating website, the other for online professional communities.

For the dating site the number of views and solid leads, meaning actual enjoyable dates skyrocketed once I took off the Facebook style "selfies" and posted professional photos. Most people look at the photo and then decide weather or not to read the profile. That was $350 in the NYC area. The photographer used Central Park and midtown as the background and included 3 wardrobe changes and profile editing.

In regards to the professional shoot, many conventions that I attended people knew me before I knew them simply by my photo. It was recent, accurate, and portrayed me in a good light; their words not mine. It helped break the ice and lead to a discussion outside the typical convention bullshit. That was $150 in the NYC, 2 business attire, one business casual and used indoor studio as well as outdoor scenery.

  I actually asked this photographer about suits and whether I should wear it or he should bring it and he just replied 'bring what image you want to portray' implying he didn't provide those things himself. 

$95 for 15 minutes? I should consider becoming a photographer!

My photographers did not provide any clothing either, nor would I want them to. Your photos should be expressions of you and that includes your fashion sense. Have you seen examples of his work? Every photographer should have a portfolio and minor touch ups should be included. A typical session will involve dozens to hundreds of shots and you pick the ones you think are best to keep and get touched up. 

Your linkedin photo should probably be from your upper chest to your face. The background should be fuzzier, your the center piece not the scenery. 

your photo should not look staged. in front of white background = looks staged

motuwallet said:   your photo should not look staged. in front of white background = looks staged
  
I disagree. Just wear a suit, shirt and tie in front of a solid background. No one was ever hurt by having a professional, formal picture.

Any input from someone with a photography background?

Has anyone who used the DIY approach (wear a suit, shirt and tie in front of a solid background, set up camera on tripod and get pic) later opted for a professional studio shot, and found any significant difference in how that affected engagement on LinkedIn?

I advised a friend who'd joined an MBA program to use a studio-shot photo on his profile, since he was already spending to get a LinkedIn Premium subscription. I'm guessing he went with Sears/JCPenney or some dept store photo studio. The resulting pic was much better than his earlier pic.
I gave the same advice to his scientist wife, and she merely cloned out the background from her previous pic.

IMHO, white background looks too insipid. Any decent studio photographer doing portraits would be able to find a nice background.
I think solid or textured blue works well (think "blue chip" companies).
Please wear a suit and tie.

I suggest you read this article before deciding whether to include a photo on linked in: http://www.economist.com/node/21551535  . TLDR version: Attractive men should include a photo, attractive women (yes really) and ugly men should not.

itzcuzimuslim said:   Any input from someone with a photography background?
  
That rate is really really cheap.  Most reputable headshot photographers (the closest thing to what you are doing that I have good knowledge about) are between $350 and $500 per session. 

Wear a suit and a tie. You are gonna like the way you look. I guarantee it.

Smile brah

Have you considered the Carlos Danger approach?

Your pic in the op looks like a young party dude kinda drunk after a wedding reception. You're wearing nice clothes , but yet its too casual of an image

You're a young good looking guy. Get a professional shoot in a suit and tie .

SUCKISSTAPLES said:   Your pic in the op looks like a young party dude kinda drunk after a wedding reception. You're wearing nice clothes , but yet its too casual of an image

You're a young good looking guy. Get a professional shoot in a suit and tie .

  I don't drink but yes it was a hot humid wedding reception. 

Will get a new photo taken

Also why the red on the initial post? 

I didnt rate your post

Go to an Apple Store on a day when they are doing demo's for how the photo software works. They'll do sample portraits for free. The only thing is there will be a white Apple logo in the background behind your head.

Yes, pay for a professional picture. I hire between 30-40 people per year. It speaks volumes about your brand and attention to detail. If you're that consistent in maintaining your own brand and making certain you are well represented, I conclude that you'll do the same for whatever company employs you.

Keep the pic off the resume. That's too much.

itzcuzimuslim said:   
$95 for 15 minutes? I should consider becoming a photographer!
 

A good photographer will spend quite a bit more time sizing, editing and cleaning up the photos as well. Add some admin costs (advertising, studio, equipment, software, etc), and your rate looks a lot more reasonable.

I'm the de facto photographer for my company as I have the equipment as I do it as a hobby. I just did head shots for our board members last week. Each photo is taking around an hour of post editing: sizing, correcting colors and tones, stray hair and blemish removal, applying a vignette. I'm slow as I'm learning, but I'm surprised how much work it is.

You should get a picture with centipedes in the background.

itzcuzimuslim said:   Any input from someone with a photography background?
   About what, exactly?

I take a lot of professional headshots, mostly for scientists and book authors. What you want depends on the field. Business/finance/sales/law = indoor studio shot with lighting, neutral gray background, business dress. Look approachable, professional, competent. Doctor/scientist/teacher = environmental portrait in workplace setting, blurred background, natural or pseudo-natural light, dress appropriate for workplace. Look like you're pausing from a busy day. IT/managerial/non-profit/student/misc = business casual, neutral outdoor or indoor setting like a busy street, airy lobby, well lit corridor. Look happy and energetic. Ski instructor = parka, goggles, tongue out, hand up with fingers in a "right-on, dude" configuration.

fatbaby said:   Pics?
  You want his pics?

I hope they don't come to know your OP name. Good luck for the interview.

bharatiya said:   I hope they don't come to know your OP name. Good luck for the interview.
  The screen name is a joke from the Ali G show on HBO. 

This thread is incomplete until mikef07 weighs in with his opinion.

Advantages to showing your pic on your resume/linkedin profile:

  • hiring manager might find you attractive, giving you an edge

Disadvantages to showing your pic on your resume/linkedin profile:

  • you may be considered vain
  • you may be considered tacky, and possibly non-creative
  • you may be considered apathetic about privacy
  • you may be considered not street-wise (hope this is not an information security position)
  • you may be considered willing to opportunistically exploit biases that work against unattractive competing candidates
  • you may be considered willing to work in an organization that might be influenced by this kind of bias
  • you may be considered conservative (could turn into an advantage if the company is dominated by conservatives, but it's not a good risk)


In some countries it's standard to put a photo on a resume. I find it atrocious. If I ran a company in such a country, I would have a secretary to cut off all the photos before giving managers access to the CV.

I was always impressed by the profs who said "don't put your name on your tests... instead, put this unique number on it so I don't know who you are when I'm scoring".

bonghead said:   Advantages to showing your pic on your resume/linkedin profile:

  • hiring manager might find you attractive, giving you an edge

Disadvantages to showing your pic on your resume/linkedin profile:

  • you may be considered vain
  • you may be considered tacky, and possibly non-creative
  • you may be considered apathetic about privacy
  • you may be considered not street-wise (hope this is not an information security position)
  • you may be considered willing to opportunistically exploit biases that work against unattractive competing candidates
  • you may be considered willing to work in an organization that might be influenced by this kind of bias
  • you may be considered conservative (could turn into an advantage if the company is dominated by conservatives, but it's not a good risk)


In some countries it's standard to put a photo on a resume. I find it atrocious. If I ran a company in such a country, I would have a secretary to cut off all the photos before giving managers access to the CV.

I was always impressed by the profs who said "don't put your name on your tests... instead, put this unique number on it so I don't know who you are when I'm scoring".

  The reality of the matter is that everyone googles everyone these days. If I'm about to have a meeting with someone I type in their name and phone number and do a soft-background check on them. Not because I care about security or safety but, for conversation starters. "Oh, so I here you went to USC, so did I. Blah, Blah Blah."

I just hope the OP is mart enough to not use Facebook or other personal online community website information across professional networks. Websites like www.tineye.com can crossmatch images and show exactly where they originated from. You could inadvertently link your professional image to your myspace,facebook,online dating profile. 

Really, this all varies depending upon what industry you are an and what role you fulfill in that industry. Salesman, sure create your own brand and be on every professional site; secretary not so much. 

JamesPolk said:   
motuwallet said:   your photo should not look staged. in front of white background = looks staged
  
I disagree. Just wear a suit, shirt and tie in front of a solid background. No one was ever hurt by having a professional, formal picture.

  I did weigh in.  I voted this green.  Pretty spot on.

You don't need a professional photo. Wear a suit, and have someone take a few headshot pics with your digital camera and pick the best one. 

A bad "professional" photo is worse than a decent regular photo. Unless your photographer has some great results that you'd like to duplicate... don't spend the money.

use photo from your vacation or any event where you are in natural smile (happy) situation. Crop it to your face only and it will work as well. Photo OP with tie, suit, pro background will look clearly staged!


100% Worth it! Ignore anybody who says otherwise. Whenever I receive an application, I often LinkedIn them to see who I'm reading about. We're all human and judge each other. Attractive women do much better than ugly ones. I also take more notice when a good looking female recruiter on LinkedIn contacts me.

If you get one picture on LinkedIn, make it a good one. Business casual. My coworker's company image is the same one they took against a brick wall and it makes him look like a child. He's now the Sr. VP and I was just commenting about how every email I received from him (using MS Outlook) made him look like a kid because of his thumbnail on the emails. He recently changed it and now I can take him seriously.

save money. combine with facebook, match.com and craiglist photo shoot for optimum results. don't mix up the nekkid craiglist photo with your professional linkedin photo, unless you are the pornstar you wish you were...
remember to get a receipt so you can deduct from your job search expense (as allowed by IRS)...

Skipping 3 Messages...
Just suit and tie..no pants needed... Spend that money for the photographer



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