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you can look into wellness coaching certification. Well Coaches thats what my wife did after her masters and found a job at a big insurance company as a Coach.

carl1864 said:   I'm talking Heavy construction workers, Butchers, Laborers, Assembly line workers, and many other jobs that most people wouldn't even want to do for a day, let alone a career.  I've asked many, and the most common response is "What am I going to do with my time if I don't work?".  

I just don't understand it though, there are so many awesome things to see, places to go, talents to learn, things to experience, people/family to spend time with, hobbies to do, etc. You could never even do them all even if you never worked a day in your life.  So why for example would the laborer prefer to jackhammer concrete than go scuba diving in the tropics, if money were no object?
 

  
Perhaps this is a coincidence, but do you notice a similarity between the jobs you mentioned?  They're all fairly active jobs. As a guy with a job that's 75% desk job (engineer), but some of the guys I work with are 5% desk (mechanics, electricians, machinists), it honestly seems to me like the people who are physically active in their job are happier in their job.

Also, as someone who has had (somewhat) voluntary gaps in my career history, whenever I think of life without a job, it does seem boring because I think back to when I was surviving on about 10k a year. It IS boring cuz you can't do much.  I think those that claim they would continue to work after winning the lottery, can't fully grasp the concept of what it's like if you could do ANYTHING. They think back to times when they were sitting around the house bored because they didn't have $10mil in the bank. To them, that's what "without a job" is.

scubasteve said:   
carl1864 said:   I'm talking Heavy construction workers, Butchers, Laborers, Assembly line workers, and many other jobs that most people wouldn't even want to do for a day, let alone a career.  I've asked many, and the most common response is "What am I going to do with my time if I don't work?".  

I just don't understand it though, there are so many awesome things to see, places to go, talents to learn, things to experience, people/family to spend time with, hobbies to do, etc. You could never even do them all even if you never worked a day in your life.  So why for example would the laborer prefer to jackhammer concrete than go scuba diving in the tropics, if money were no object?

  
Perhaps this is a coincidence, but do you notice a similarity between the jobs you mentioned?  They're all fairly active jobs. As a guy with a job that's 75% desk job (engineer), but some of the guys I work with are 5% desk (mechanics, electricians, machinists), it honestly seems to me like the people who are physically active in their job are happier in their job.

Also, as someone who has had (somewhat) voluntary gaps in my career history, whenever I think of life without a job, it does seem boring because I think back to when I was surviving on about 10k a year. It IS boring cuz you can't do much.  I think those that claim they would continue to work after winning the lottery, can't fully grasp the concept of what it's like if you could do ANYTHING. They think back to times when they were sitting around the house bored because they didn't have $10mil in the bank. To them, that's what "without a job" is.

I've ridden a desk for almost 10 years as an engineer...but I have done tons of heavy work outside of that job (house renovation, mainly). while it is nice to move a lot (i enjoy the side work more than the engineering), by the time a big job is over, you dont have much left at the end of the day. if my side work is slow, i have WAY more energy for socializing, having fun. my first flip ever was absolutely brutal - i worked nights and weekend for 6 months, ended up getting carpal tunnel in my wrists from all the labor. would i do it again? sure, the pain went away but the huge profit didn't

also - name a job where moving constantly pays really well. and no, athlete doesnt count!

what is that matrix in the military, where active men with subpar minds make good infantry...active men with good minds will micromanage and overreach...you need a lazy man with a good mind to be in charge. eh, look that up. 

solarUS said:   
 

 what is that matrix in the military, where active men with subpar minds make good infantry...active men with good minds will micromanage and overreach...you need a lazy man with a good mind to be in charge. eh, look that up




I actually am interested in looking this up, sounds interesting, although don't exactly know where to start or what search terms to use.

How does the lazy man with the good mind get in charge in the first place though?  I didn't think lazy people typically got promoted, but maybe I'm wrong.

also - name a job where moving constantly pays rea said: lly well. and no, athlete ]also - name a job where moving constantly pays really well. and no, athlete 
  Depending on definition of "really well" but electricians can make 100-130k.  It does take a toll on the body over the years, I'm 24 years into it and doubt I can do it for another 20. I am planing on another 10 years and through investments, retire comfortably at 50. 

chrsb said:   
also - name a job where moving constantly pays rea said: ]lly well. and no, athlete ]also - name a job where moving constantly pays really well. and no, athlete 
  Depending on definition of "really well" but electricians can make 100-130k.  It does take a toll on the body over the years, I'm 24 years into it and doubt I can do it for another 20. I am planing on another 10 years and through investments, retire comfortably at 50. 

  
Sure you can find some electricians making >100k especially self employed contractors but its not common.   Union scale here is like $30/hr and in my dads home city its $23/hr.    Overtime can net you a bigger income of course but high overtime jobs are rare.
 

It's $36 here in Detroit. With overtime they can hit 100k pretty easily. I'm not saying its easy for electricians to make 100k+ but it can be done. As a young journeyman I hit it 2 years then most years 80-90. There's another side to it too, some years were 50k or less when times were slow. As I said earlier in the thread, its not easy work and can be stressful. For the most part though I have loved my job. With proper planing skilled trades can live a comfortable life.

chrsb, yeah that all sounds about right. I think it does also depend a lot on local market and union strength. My dads market scale hasn't even gone up 50% in the past 25 years. I just don't want people getting the idea that $100k incomes are normal.



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