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Thank you everyone for your insights and recommendations.

He is taking some hard classes in HS and trying hard, and if his grades were somewhat above average I wouldn't even post this question. But the math example highlights the problem. I like JaxFl suggestion and will have him take the Myers Briggs to assess his strength and weakness. I also like the RN idea and have asked him about that path before. But he's a kid at heart and like to help kids. He said he's a "people person" but would rather work with kids.

As I stated originally, I support him all the way. But it's reasonable to have a realistic assessment and contingency plan, especially when I'm footing his tuition. I hate for him to spend so many years in college and then having to live in my basement after college life.

OneBread said:   Thank you everyone for your insights and recommendations.

He is taking some hard classes in HS and trying hard, and if his grades were somewhat above average I wouldn't even post this question. But the math example highlights the problem. I like JaxFl suggestion and will have him take the Myers Briggs to assess his strength and weakness. I also like the RN idea and have asked him about that path before. But he's a kid at heart and like to help kids. He said he's a "people person" but would rather work with kids.

As I stated originally, I support him all the way. But it's reasonable to have a realistic assessment and contingency plan, especially when I'm footing his tuition. I hate for him to spend so many years in college and then having to live in my basement after college life.

Hi OneBread, I cannot recommend going the RN route enough. I find that the doctors that I work with actually get to spend very little time with their patients, while I am able to spend time with sick kids and their families, one 12-hour shift at a time. Being a nurse is not ideal. There's quite a bit of stress relative to pay. Getting an RN on your son's way to MD is a great idea, because at any point, if he decides to be satisfied with his current status (and quit getting more education), he can earn a living very easily. Nursing school is also quite difficult. It could potentially turn him in another direction if he doesn't like to work that hard, which could serve as a much less expensive lesson than medical school.

OneBread said:   Thank you everyone for your insights and recommendations.

He is taking some hard classes in HS and trying hard, and if his grades were somewhat above average I wouldn't even post this question. But the math example highlights the problem. I like JaxFl suggestion and will have him take the Myers Briggs to assess his strength and weakness. I also like the RN idea and have asked him about that path before. But he's a kid at heart and like to help kids. He said he's a "people person" but would rather work with kids.

As I stated originally, I support him all the way. But it's reasonable to have a realistic assessment and contingency plan, especially when I'm footing his tuition. I hate for him to spend so many years in college and then having to live in my basement after college life.

  
"Somewhat above average?"  Having gone to a good private HS and being top 5 in my class, then going to Michigan and seeing that I was about average, made me really appreciate the educational pyramid.  Granted, I could have applied myself more, but all of my Michigan friends are smart, and there aren't a lot of guaranteed bottom curve dwellers.  At a good school, you will have foreign governments paying the top kids in their country to get an education.  They will be studying on Friday while you are chugging natty light.  

It's like sports:  Most great Junior High School players are good in HS, most great HS players are good/walk-on in college, most great college players don't make the pros.  A good medical school is the equivalent of the pros.     

He could become a priest. That way he'd more than likely still be working closely with children. <Sorry, couldn't resist> 



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